Designing an interactive Ecosystem for Sustainable Living

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Presented May 6th, 2010 at SFU Exchange in Vancouver, BC.

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Designing an interactive Ecosystem for Sustainable Living

  1. 1. DESIGNING AN INTERACTIVE ECOSYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE LIVING Johnny Rodgers MSc Candidate School of Interactive Arts + Technology http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca SFU Exchange May 6th, 2010
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION •  My research aims to make the consumption of residential resources visible in order to support informed decision-making •  Approaches: •  Information visualization •  Human-computer interaction •  Ubiquitous computing Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  3. 3. ENGAGING RESIDENTS •  Feedback can reduce energy consumption by 5-20% from baseline •  Providing more information is only part of the solution •  Feedback must be contextualized, and sensitive to constraints of setting R.D. Katzev and T.R. Johnson, Promoting energy conservation: An analysis of behavioural research, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987. Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  4. 4. TOOLS: Dashboards & Analytic Interfaces Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  5. 5. TOOLS: Point-of-consumption Feedback Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  6. 6. TOOLS: Mobile Tools Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  7. 7. TOOLS: ‘Smart’ Appliances Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  8. 8. TOOLS: Ambient & Artistic Displays Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  9. 9. MOTIVATING CHANGE •  Feedback is necessary but not sufficient •  Penalties (high prices) work better than rewards •  Intrinsic incentives (pleasures of conservation) work better than penalties or prizes •  Social influences are key •  Combinations of strategies work best •  For long-term change, new norms must be adopted R.D. Katzev and T.R. Johnson, Promoting energy conservation: An analysis of behavioural research, Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987. W. Abrahamse, L. Steg, C. Vlek, T. Rothengatter, "A review of intervention studies aimed at household energy conservation" Journal of Environmental Psychology, 25 (3), pp. 273-291, 2005. Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  10. 10. FINDINGS •  Combine different motivational techniques in order to amplify the effects of each •  Address multiple perspectives on energy conservation by catering to various motivations and mental models •  Provide multiple methods of access to the same information •  Support in-the-moment, situated decision-making as well as long-term planning •  Define baselines of energy consumption appropriate to individual circumstances •  Combine feedback with opportunities for change Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  11. 11. AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH •  Information when and where it’s needed •  Integrated with the home Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  12. 12. ALIS: AWARE LIVING INTERFACE SYSTEM Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  13. 13. AMBIENT & ARTISTIC FEEDBACK •  Display information that is important but not critical •  Can move from the periphery to the focus of attention and back again •  Provide subtle changes to reflect updates •  Are aesthetically pleasing and environmentally appropriate Z. Pousman, J. Stasko, "A taxonomy of ambient information systems: Four patterns of design," Proc. Advanced Visual Interfaces, pp. 67–74, 2006. Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  14. 14. PROTOTYPE: Ambient Canvas •  Feedback on residential resource use: energy, water, natural gas •  Embedded in kitchen backsplash of West House Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  15. 15. EXAMPLE: Water Use Feedback •  Average Canadian uses 335L of water per day •  Ambient Canvas ‘fills up’ as water is used Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  16. 16. NEXT STEPS •  Further refinement and development of prototypes •  Experimental evaluation of ambient and artistic displays •  Longitudinal studies in West House Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010
  17. 17. THANK YOU Thanks to our many sponsors and partners on the North House and West House projects, and especially to all of my incredible teammates and collaborators during this research! Johnny Rodgers MSc Candidate School of Interactive Arts + Technology http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca jgr3@sfu.ca Designing an interactive ecosystem for sustainable living Johnny Rodgers • MSc Candidate • School of Interactive Arts + Technology • http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca • SFU Exchange • May 6th, 2010

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