Course Name: Enterprise Architecture Framework and Information Systems Planning Essentials                                ...
Day 4:                    MORNING                                     AFTERNOON08:00-08:30                                ...
Training NotesIntroduction:Enterprise architectures provides the “living documents” called reference models to make theorg...
Part 01: DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDSEnterprise Architecture Description (from various references)FEA definition:     "The FE...
Terminology                                      Definition                               SourceArchitecture              ...
ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE CONTEXT IN GOVERNMENT MODELAligning the information and communications techonology services to the...
Part 02: COMPETENCY AND MATURITYImportance of Enterprise ArchitectureSchekkerman, J. (2005). Trends in Enterprise Architec...
The Enteprise Architect Responsibilities(TOGAF)        TASKS                                                  DESCRIPTIONS...
Part 03: ENTEPRISE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK: TOGAFGuidance Componets01. Architecture Development Method Cycle        Introdu...
Part 04: ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK: NASCIO DEVELOPMENT TOOLKIT      TOOLKIT COMPONENTS                            ...
Part 05: ZACHMAN ARCHITECTURE INTERROGATIVESThe focus of an enterprise architects is to elaborate, analyze, and build the ...
Part 06: ARCHITECTURE COMPONENT ELABORATIONBUSINESS ARCHITECTURE       Understanding how the business is       Identify Bu...
NASCIO ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE DEVELOPMENT TOOLKIT – EA DOMAINSBUSINESS REFERENCE      It provides an organized, hierarchi...
Part 07: BUSINESS ANALYSIS FRAMEWORKBusiness Analysis Body of KnowledgeInternational Institute of Business AnalysisBusines...
Part 08: PROCESS MAPPING AND PERFORMANCE MODELBusiness and Process Entity Requirements DefinitionBUSINESS DEFINITION MATRI...
PROCESS MAPPING: SWIM LANEFUNCTION UNIT:                                      PROCESS NAME:           ACTOR               ...
Part 09: INFORMATION MATURITY MODEL    MATURITY STAGE                                  DESCRIPTIONSLEVEL 1              Th...
Part 10: DATA AND APPLICATION MODELData DictionaryData dictionary is an organized collection of data elements names and de...
Application Use Case IdentificationA use case is a methodology used in system analysis to identify, clarify, and organize ...
Preconditions          List any activities that must take place, or any conditions that must be true,                     ...
Part 11: TECHNOLOGY REFERENCE MODEL            COMPONENTS         CONFIGURATION ITEMS   SPECIFICATIONSHardware PlatformsOp...
Part 12: INFORMATION SECURITY MODELThe Security Domain defines the roles, technologies, standards, and policies necessary ...
Part 13: MODEL OF STRATEGIC PLANNINGStrategic Alignment Model(Venkatraman, Henderson and Oldach)The difficulty to realize ...
The Test of Effective Strategy                   THE TESTS                                                THE INDICATORSGo...
Part 14: STRATEGIC PLAN INTERROGATIVES  •   Internal and External Environment Scan.      Internal (evaluation of capabilit...
Part 15: ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING WORK PLANORGANIZE      1.    Identify and engage the service of th...
Part 16: STRATEGIC PLANNING INPUT AND THINKING TOOLSEnvironmental Scanning:   1. Strengths are internal factors that creat...
Strategic Goal Setting:   1. What do you want that you dont have? (Achieve)   2. What do you want that you already have? (...
Strategic Investments:   STRATEGIC GOAL         ACTIVITIES    TIMELINES     SERVICES/GOODS    ESTIMATED                   ...
Part 17: STRATEGIC PLAN AUTHORING TEMPLATEExecutive SummaryPART 1: ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILEDEPARTMENT/AGENCY VISION/MISSION ...
B.4. ORGANIZATIONAL FUNCTIONAL CHART               • Functional Flow Chart            C. THE DEPARTMENT AND ITS ENVIRONMEN...
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR INFORMATION SYSTEM        input-storage-process-output-sharing modelDETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE I...
DATABASE REQUIRED    Name of          General Content          Status           Information             Data Archiving, St...
A.1.2 DEPLOYMENT OF ICT EQUIPMENT    NAME OF OFFICE/                        ITEMS                                    NUMBE...
A.4.2 EXISTING ICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE            A.4.3 PROPOSED ICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE            A.4.4 .PLACE...
B. INFORMATION SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE  NAME OF INFORMATION / SUBSYSTEM /MODULES   YEAR 1               YEAR 2    ...
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ICT4GOV Enterprise Architecture Training Notes

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Training notes to guide discussion on the framework, methodology, process, tools and software of doing Enterprise Architecture to strategically plan e-services in government.

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ICT4GOV Enterprise Architecture Training Notes

  1. 1. Course Name: Enterprise Architecture Framework and Information Systems Planning Essentials Day 1: MORNING AFTERNOON08:00-08:30 01:00-03:00Registration Enterprise Architecture: TOGAF FRAMEWORK08:30-09:00 03:00-03:30Course Orientation Coffee Break09:00-10:00 03:30-5:00Enterprise Architecture: Enterprise Architecture:DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS NASCIO TOOLKIT10:00-10:30 05:00Coffee Break Home10:30-12:00Enterprise Architecture:COMPETENCY AND MATURITY12:00Lunch Break DAY 2 MORNING AFTERNOON08:00-08:30 01:00-03:00Lessons Learned Enterprise Architecture: BUSINESS ANALYSIS FRAMEWORK08:30-10:00 03:00-03:30Enterprise Architecture: Coffee BreakZACHMAN INTERROGATIVES10:00-10:30 03:30-05:00Coffee Break Enterprise Architecture: PERFORMANCE MODEL & PROCESS MAPPING10:30-12:00Enterprise Architecture:ARCHITECTURE COMPONENTS ELABORATION12:00-01:00Lunch Break DAY 3 MORNING AFTERNOON08:00-08:30 01:00-03:00Lessons Learned Enterprise Architecture: TECHNOLOGY REFERENCE MODEL08:30-10:00 03:00-03:30Enterprise Architecture: Coffee BreakINFORMATION MATURITY MODEL10:00-10:30 03:30-05:00Coffee Break Enterprise Architecture: INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY MATURITY MODEL10:30-12:00Enterprise Architecture:DATA AND APPLICATION CONCEPTUAL MODEL12:00-01:00Lunch Break
  2. 2. Day 4: MORNING AFTERNOON08:00-08:30 01:00-03:00Lessons Learned Information Systems Strategic Planning: STRATEGIC PLAN INPUT AND THINKING TOOLS08:30-10:00 03:00-03:30Information Systems Strategic Planning: Coffee BreakMODELS OF STRATEGIC PLANNING10:00-10:30 03:30-05:00Coffee Break Information Systems Strategic Planning: STRATEGIC PLAN AUTHORING TEMPLATE10:30-12:00 05:00Information Systems Strategic Planning: HomeSTRATEGIC PLAN INTERROGATIVES AND WORKPLAN12:00Lunch Break Day 5: MORNING AFTERNOON08:00-08:30 01:00-03:00Lessons Learned Open Standard Software and Templates: ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE BUSINESS CASE AND TERMS OF REFERENCE08:30-10:00 03:00-03:30Open Standard Software and Templates: Coffee BreakDOCUMENTATION SOFTWARE10:00-10:30 03:30-05:00Coffee Break Open Standard Software and Template ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING PROJECT PLAN10:30-12:00 05:00Open Standard Software and Templates: HomePROCESS AND DATA MODELER SOFTWARE12:00Lunch Break
  3. 3. Training NotesIntroduction:Enterprise architectures provides the “living documents” called reference models to make theorganization to effectively and efficiently managed recordings, expectations, processes,configurations, metrics, work arounds, changes, relationships, collaborations, interchanges,requirement tracing, control, and marketing of the business operation. It provides a “single-reference-of-truth” to properly lead the business process improvement and the optimal value-added integration of technology in the business operation of the organization.The enterprise architecture tools provide the principles, methods, vocabulary, conventions,presentation objects, procedures, software, repositories, and artifacts in order to draw thereference models of the enterprise that speaks of its business, information, technology, andpeople.The drawn models are kept in digital repository and made accessible anytime when businessstrategic planning, enterprise performance evaluation, and program and ICT projectdevelopment are initiated by the organization. It is reconfigured when new understanding aboutthe business, information, technology, and people are brought in by the improved enterprisestrategy, new program and projects, and enterprise metrics.The “Doing the Enterprise Architecture” process requires the collaborative engagement betweenthe “minds and practitioners” running the business processes and those delivering thetechnology services. It is to properly compose the reference models of the organization that willmake the business functional units and ICT service providers to realize the performanceobjectives through information and communication technology.ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE PRACTICE IN THE AGENCY: CHECK LISTDoes your agency maintains a blueprint or matrix of all running systems, showing how YES NO NOTthey interoperate, and which technology they are using? SURECan your agency readily presents the professional and business user matrix with with YES NO NOTtheir requirements, and the technology services that address those requirements? SUREDoes your agency have a documented map of enterprise-wide data, how data is being YES NO NOTgrouped, how data are related, how data is being accessed, how data is shared, and SUREhow data is secured?Are there silos of data and application in the different units of the agency? YES NO NOT SUREWhen your agency start a project do you have an enterprise architecture blueprint, YES NO NOTwhich you have to align the type of application to be designed and developed? SUREIs there a formal stage in the project life cycle where system architecture is being YES NO NOTchecked against the enterprise architecture? SUREIf you have any question or problem regarding architecture do you know who to seek YES NO NOTfor guidance, decision and documentation? SUREIs there an official guidance and listing of all business standards, methods and and YES NO NOTtools, technical references that both IT and Business have to use, or you can use SUREwhatever technology you want?
  4. 4. Part 01: DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDSEnterprise Architecture Description (from various references)FEA definition: "The FEA (Federal Enterprise Architecture) consists of a set of interrelated "reference models" designed to facilitate cross-agency analysis and the identification of duplicative investments, gaps and opportunities for collaboration within and across agencies. Collectively, the reference models comprise a framework for describing important elements of the FEA in a common and consistent way. Through the use of this common framework and vocabulary, IT portfolios can be better managed and leveraged across the federal government."CIO Definitions from SearchCIO.com, posted October, 2006: "An enterprise architecture (EA) is a conceptual blueprint that defines the structure and operation of an organization. The intent of an enterprise architecture is to determine how an organization can most effectively achieve its current and future objectives. Purported advantages of having an enterprise architecture include improved decision making, improved adaptability to changing demands or market conditions, elimination of inefficient and redundant processes, optimization of the use of organizational assets, and minimization of employee turnover."NASCIO Enterprise Architecture Development Toolkit v.3.0 “Enterprise architecture defines an enterprise-wide, integrated set of components that incorporates strategic business thinking, information assets, and the technical infrastructure of an enterprise to promote information sharing across agency and organizational boundaries. The Enterprise Architecture is supported by Architecture Governance and the allied architectures of, Business, Information, Technology and Solution Architectures.” "enterprise" as any collection of organizations that has a common set of goals. For example, an enterprise could be a government agency, a whole corporation, a division of a corporation, a single department, or a chain of geographically distant organizations linked together by common ownership.TOGAF version 9.0 The term "enterprise" in the context of "enterprise architecture" can be used to denote both an entire enterprise - encompassing all of its information and technology services, processes, and infrastructure - and a specific domain within the enterprise. In both cases, the architecture crosses multiple systems, and multiple functional groups within the enterprise.CLINGER-COHEN Enterprise Architecture (EA) links the business mission, strategy, and processes of an organization to its IT strategy. It is documented using multiple architectural models or views that show how the current and future needs of an organization will be met. By focusing on strategic differentiators and working across the enterprise, there is a unique opportunity to create leverage and synergies and avoid duplication and inconsistencies across the enterprise. The key components of the EA are: • Accurate representation of the business environment, strategy and critical success factors • Comprehensive documentation of business units and key processes • Views of the systems and data that support these processes • A set of technology standards that define what technologies and products are approved to be used within an organization, complemented by prescriptive enterprise-wide guidelines on how to best apply these technology standards in creating business applications.
  5. 5. Terminology Definition SourceArchitecture The specification that identifies components and their Software associated functionalities. It describes connectivity of Engineering components and the mapping of of functionality into Institute components. Architectures can be of different types and cover hardware, software, systems, and can be domain specific to describes business, data, application, technology, network, security, etc..Architecture View It is a representation of the set of system elements and the IEEE relation associated with them. It represents a whole system from the perspective of related sets of concerns. Views are representations of the many system structures that are present simultaneously in software system.Architecture Framework The combination of structured processes, templates, and NASCIO governance that facilitate the elicitation and documentation of the architecture in a systematic manner.Architecture Domain High level gouping of disciplines, functional or topical OMB, NASCIO operations that form the main building block of the architectural framework. It talks of sphere of activity, interest, or functions.Architecture Component Level of details contain in specific architectural domain NASCIOEnterprise An organization supporting a defined business scope and MITRE EABOOK mission. An enterprise is comprised of interdependent resources (people, organizations, and technology) who must coordinate their functions and share information in support of a common missionEnterprise Any collection of organizations that has a common set of TOGAF goals.Enterprise Architecture Artifacts Artifacts constitute any object, or work product that is NASCIO developed as a component of the enterprise architecture. Artifacts includes trends, principles, mission, goals, objectives, strategies, capabilities, processes, processes steps, entities, attributes, relationship, subject areas, application components, application, database, network infrastructure, and configuration details.Business Architecture The high level representation of the business strategies, NASCIO intentions, functions, processess, information, and assets critical to operating the business of government successfully.Business Reference Model It is a function driven framework that describes the business OMB operation independent of the organization performing the job. It provides an organized and hierarchical construct for describing the day-to-day business operation.Data Reference Model It describes the data and information that supports the CIOGOV government agency operation from an agency and government-wide perspective.Performance Reference Model It is the standardized framework to measure the OCIO-DOI performance of major IT investments and their contribution to program performance.Technology Reference Model It is a component-driven, technical framework used to OCIO-DOI categorize the standards, specifications, and technologies that support and enable the delivery of service components and capabilities
  6. 6. ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE CONTEXT IN GOVERNMENT MODELAligning the information and communications techonology services to the directives, business, informationand technology architecture of the government agency.
  7. 7. Part 02: COMPETENCY AND MATURITYImportance of Enterprise ArchitectureSchekkerman, J. (2005). Trends in Enterprise Architecture, Institute for Enterprise ArchitectureDevelopment, white paper. VALUE INDICATORS DESCRIPTIONSAlignment Enterprise architecture provides the framework to enable better alignment of business and information technology objectives. The architecture used can also serve as a communication tool.Integration Enterprise architecture establishes the infrastructure that enables business rules to be consistently applied across the organization, documents data flows, uses and interfaces.Value Creation Enterprise architecture provides better measurement of information technology economic value in an environment where there is a higher potential for reusable hardware and software assetsChange Management Enterprise architecture establishes consistent infrastructure and formalizing the management of the infrastructure and information assets better enables an organization-wide change management process to be established to handle information technology changesCompliance Enterprise architecture provides the artifacts necessary to ensure legal and regulatory compliance for the technical infrastructure and environment.Maturity Levels of Enterprise Architecture Program(NASCIO) Maturity Level Status Name DescriptionLEVEL O No Program There is not a documented architectural framework in place at this level of maturity. While solutions are developed and implemented, this is done with no recognized standards or base practices. The organization is completely reliant on the knowledge of independent contributors.LEVEL 1 Informal Program The base architecture framework and standards have been defined and are typically performed informally. There is general consensus that these steps should be performed, however they may not be tracked and followed. Organizations with an Enterprise Architecture framework at this level are still dependant on the knowledge of individual contributors.LEVEL 2 Repeatable Program The base architecture and standards have been identified and are being tracked and verified. At this point in the program processes are repeatable and reusable templates are starting to be developed. The need for product and compliance components to conform to the standards and requirements has been agreed upon, and metrics are used to track process area performance.LEVEL 3 Well Defined The enterprise architecture framework is well defined; using approved Program standard and/or customized versions of the templates. Processes are documented across the organization. Performance metrics are being tracked and monitored in relationship to other general practices and process areas.LEVEL 4 Managed Program At this point performance metrics are collected, analyzed and acted upon. The metrics are used to predict performance and provide better understanding of the processes and capabilities.LEVEL 5 Continously The processes are mature; targets have been set for effectiveness and Improved Vital efficiency based on business and technical goals. There are ongoing Program refinements and improvements based on the understanding of the impact changes have to these processes.
  8. 8. The Enteprise Architect Responsibilities(TOGAF) TASKS DESCRIPTIONSUnderstand and Probe for information, listen to information, influence people, facilitate consensusinterpret building, synthesize and translate ideas into actionable requirements, articulate thoserequirements ideas to others. Identify use or purpose, constraints, risks, etc. The architect participates in the discovery and documentation of the customers business scenarios that are driving the solution. The architect is responsible for requirements understanding and embodies that requirements understanding in the architecture specification.Create a useful Take the requirements and develop well-formulated models of the components of themodel solution, augmenting the models as necessary to fit all of the circumstances. Show multiple views through models to communicate the ideas effectively. The architect is responsible for the overall architecture integrity and maintaining the vision of the offering from an architectural perspective. The architect also ensures leverage opportunities are identified, using building blocks, and is a liaison between the functional groups (especially development and marketing) to ensure that the leverage opportunities are realized. The architect provides and maintains these models as a framework for understanding the domain(s) of development work, guiding what should be done within the organization, or outside the organization. The architect must represent the organization view of the architecture by understanding all the necessary business componentsValidate, refine, and Verify assumptions, bring in subject matter experts, etc. in order to improve the modelexpand the model and to further define it, adding as necessary new ideas to make the result more flexible and more tightly linked to current and expected requirements. The architect additionally should assess the value of solution-enhancing developments emanating from field work and incorporate these into the architecture models as appropriate.Manage the Continuously monitor the models and update them as necessary to show changes,architecture additions, and alterations. Represent architecture and issues during development and decision points of the program. The architect is an "agent of change", representing that need for the implementation of the architecture. Through this development cycle, the architect continuously fosters the sharing of customer, architecture, and technical information between organizationsCLINGER-COHEN ENTERPRISE ARCHITECT SUMMARY OF COMPETENCIES • A basic grounding in the agency’s environment, strategy and priorities • Extensive knowledge of IT capabilities, covering current and emerging technologies • Good knowledge of how similar agencies use or plan to use technology • Ability to rationalize technology opportunities and business drivers optimizing return on investment • Familiar with agency’s architectural principles and policies, able to interpret and apply • “Hands on” experience in architecture, able to perform a number of architectural tasks • Must have a mixture of BPR, business processes, and meeting facility • Strong in capability modeling • Can define and understand component capabilities and apply solutions • Ability to look at technology trends and effectively apply to business/project needs • Ability to look at and define target architecture for speciality projects • Ability to manage a repository - repository modeling and analysis • Competency in several tool sets • Ability to manage a project portal to identify concepts, work in progress, etc. • Able to identify redundancies among existing and proposed IT efforts • Ability to bring together an overall Enterprise Architecture from several individual EA efforts • Ability to develop the crux functional integration services that can be implemented in patterns
  9. 9. Part 03: ENTEPRISE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK: TOGAFGuidance Componets01. Architecture Development Method Cycle Introduction to the ADM Preliminary Phase Phase A: Architecture Vision Phase B: Business Architecture Phase C: Information Systems Architectures Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Data Architecture Phase C: Information Systems Architectures - Applications Architecture Phase D: Technology Architecture Phase E: Opportunities and Solutions Phase F: Migration Planning Phase G: Implementation Governance Phase H: Architecture Change Management ADM Architecture Requirements Management02. Architecture Development Method Guidelines Applying Iteration to the ADMand Techniques Applying the ADM at different Enterprise Levels Security Architecture and the ADM Using TOGAF to define and Govern SOAs Architecture Principles Architecture Stakeholder Management Architecture Patterns Business Scenarios Gap Analysis Migration Planning Techniques Interoperability Requirements Business Transformation Readiness Assessment Risk Management Capability-Based Planning03. Architecture Content Framework Introduction to the Architecture Content Framework Content Metamodel Architectural Artifacts Architectural Deliverables Building Blocks04. Enterprise Continoum Tools Introduction Enterprise Continuum Architecture Partitioning Architecture Repository Tools for Architecture Development05. Reference Model Foundation Architecture: TRM III-RM06. Architecture Capability Introduction Establishing an Architecture Capability Architecture Board Architecture Compliance Architecture Contracts Architecture Governance Architecture Maturity Models Architecture Skills Framework
  10. 10. Part 04: ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK: NASCIO DEVELOPMENT TOOLKIT TOOLKIT COMPONENTS DESCRIPTIONArchitecture Governance The processes necessary to direct or guide initiatives, to ensure that performance aligns with the enterprise, to enable the enterprise business by exploiting opportunities, and to ensure resources are used responsibly and architecture-related risks are managed appropriately.Business Architecture An architecture within EA that provides the high-level representation of the business strategies, intentions, functions, processes, information and assets critical to providing services to citizens, businesses, governments and the like. Business architecture should include an environmental context, market or need assessment, strategic business intent, traceability to capabilities and the management initiatives that will deliver or further leverage those enabling capabilities. Business architecture is defined by some as constituting the top two rows of the Zachman Framework.Information Architecture The compilation of the business requirements of the enterprise, the information process entities and integration that drive the business and rules for selecting, building and maintaining that information. This includes data and process architecture.Solution Architecture An architecture within EA that guides the solution architect in the design of a particulate solution set. For each solution set, Solution Architecture assists in: • The identification of business requirements, • ƒThe determination of the design specifications necessary to deliver the business requirements, • The development of the solution set design. Integrating designs based on details with the Business, Information and Technology blueprints.Technical Architecture A disciplined approach to describing the current and future structure and inter-relationships of the enterprise’s technologies in order to maximize value in those technologies. It examines the technologies that are required to run the enterprise and develops a unified vision of the enterprise’s infrastructure and technology platforms.Enterprise Architecture Facilitation A guide on building the enterprise architecture team, and theGuide tasks to be performed in implementing an enteprise architecture program for the government enterprise.
  11. 11. Part 05: ZACHMAN ARCHITECTURE INTERROGATIVESThe focus of an enterprise architects is to elaborate, analyze, and build the relationships amongtechnology, information and business viewpoints in the acquisition and development of solutions … Itmakes sure that the organization can flexibly integrate with changes demanded by market positioning,innovation, etc. John Zachman provides the detailed components to describe the enteprisearchitecture.PERSPECTIVES WHAT HOW WHERE WHO WHEN WHYOBJECTIVES/ List of things List of processes List of location List of List of business List of businessSCOPES important to the enterprise the enterprise organizational events or cycles goals and the enterprise performs operates units stategiesBUSINESS MODEL Entity Business Process Logistic Network Organizational Business Master Business Plan Relationship Model (physical (Nodes and Links) Charts with Roles Schedule Diagram data flow and Skills Sets diagram)INFORMATION Data Model Application Distributed Human Interfaces Dependency Business ruleSYSTEM MODEL Data Dictionary Model and Data System Model (role, data Diagram, Entity model Flow Diagram Architecture , access) Life HistoryTECHNOLOGY Data Systems Design Systems User Interface, Control Structure Business ruleMODEL Architecture Structure Chart, Architecture Usability, -Control Flow design (Elements, Pseudo Code (Hardware, Security Design Diagram relational Software, tables) Network)DETAILED Data Design, Detailed Program Network User Screen and Timing Defintion Program LogicREPRESENTATION Physical Storage Design Architecture Security Rules Design Architecture SpecificationsFUNCTIONING Converted Data Executable Communication Trained People Business Events Enforced RulesSYSTEM Program Facilities
  12. 12. Part 06: ARCHITECTURE COMPONENT ELABORATIONBUSINESS ARCHITECTURE Understanding how the business is Identify Business Model  Business running, what are its needs, what is Functions and WHO Performs the missing and what needs to be Function. changed or improved. Definition of Business Goals and It defines the business strategy, Goals, the supporting processes, governance, organization, and key workflow, policies and business processes of the procedures. organization. Assessment of the Current State and Description of the Future State. How are the goals and objectives implemented through the ICT Solutions and the supporting technical infrastructure.DATA ARCHITECTURE It defines how data is stored, Data Element managed, and used in a system. It Data Flow Diagram establishes common guidelines for Entity Relationship data operations that make it possible Relational Structure to predict, model, and control the Data Physical Storage flow of data in the system. Data Interoperatibility Data Standard It describes the structure of an Supported Informational Themes organizations logical and physical data assets and the associated data management resourcesAPPLICATION ARCHITECTURE Application architecture consists of Current inventory of applications logical systems that manage the data and components. objects in the data architecture and support the business functions in the Evolving applications and Business Architecture. components needed to fulfill for the business units. It provides a blueprint for the Migration plans for moving the individual application systems to be EXISTING portfolio toward the deployed, the interactions between PLANNED portfolio the application systems, and their relationships to the core business processes of the organizationTECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURE It describes current and future Hardware Platform technical infrastructure and specific Operating System hardware and software technologies Application System that support the Agency information Database System systems. It provides guidance and Network & Communication System principles for implementing Security System technologies within the application Enterprise Systems Management architecture. Development Methods Technical Standards It describes the hardware, software Interoperatability References and network infrastructure needed to support the deployment of core, mission-critical applications.
  13. 13. NASCIO ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE DEVELOPMENT TOOLKIT – EA DOMAINSBUSINESS REFERENCE It provides an organized, hierarchical construct for describing the day-to-dayMODEL business operations of the Federal government. While many models exist for describing organizations - org charts, location maps, etc. - this model presents the business using a functionally driven approach. The Lines of Business and Sub-functions that comprise the BRM represent a departure from previous models of the Federal government that use antiquated, stovepiped, agency-oriented frameworks. The BRM is the first layer of the Federal Enterprise Architecture and it is the main viewpoint for the analysis of data, service components and technology.DATA REFERENCE MODEL It describes, at an aggregate level, the data and information supporting government program and business line operations. This model enables agencies to describe the types of interaction and exchanges occurring between the Federal government and citizens. The DRM categorizes government information into greater levels of detail. It also establishes a classification for Federal data and identifies duplicative data resources. A common data model will streamline information exchange processes within the Federal government and between government and external stakeholders. "Data dictionary" will enable the development of common data identification "tags" that will facilitate information exchange both within the Federal government between the government and its external stakeholders The DRM provides a standard means by which data may be described, categorized, and shared. These are reflected within each of the DRM’s three standardization areas: • Data Description: Provides a means to uniformly describe data, thereby supporting its discovery and sharing • Data Context: Facilitates discovery of data through an approach to the categorization of data according to taxonomies; additionally, enables the definition of authoritative data assets within a community of interest (COI) • Data Sharing: Supports the access and exchange of data where access consists of ad-hoc requests (such as a query of a data asset), and exchange consists of fixed, re-occurring transactions between partiesSERVICE REFERENCE It is a business and performance-driven, functional framework that classifiesMODEL Service Components with respect to how they support business and/or performance objectives. The SRM is intended for use to support the discovery of government-wide business and application Service Components in IT investments and assets. The SRM is structured across horizontal and vertical service domains that, independent of the business functions, can provide a leverage-able foundation to support the reuse of applications, application capabilities, components, and business services.TECHNICAL REFERENCE The Technical Reference Model (TRM) provides a foundation to categorizeMODEL the standards, specifications, and technologies to support the construction, delivery, and exchange of business and application components (Service Components) that may be used and leveraged in a Component-Based or Service-Oriented Architecture. The TRM unifies existing Agency TRMs and E-Gov guidance by providing a foundation to advance the re-use of technology and component services from a government-wide perspective.
  14. 14. Part 07: BUSINESS ANALYSIS FRAMEWORKBusiness Analysis Body of KnowledgeInternational Institute of Business AnalysisBusiness analysis is the set of tasks and techniques used to work as a liaison among stakeholders in orderto understand the structure, policies, and operations of an organization, and recommend solutions thatenable the organization to achieve its goals. COMPONENTS DESCRIPTIONBusiness Analysis Planning and Monitoring It describes how to determine which activities are necessary to perform in order to complete a business analysis effort. It covers identifcation of stakeholders, selection of business analysis techniques, the process we will use to manage our requirements, and how we assess the progress of the work in order to make necessary changes in work effort.Enterprise Analysis It describes how we take a business need, refne and clarify the defnition of that need, and defne a solution scope that can feasibly be implemented by the business. It covers problem defnition and analysis business case development, feasibility studies, and the defnition of a solution scope.Elicitation It describes how we work with stakeholders to fnd out what their needs are and ensure that we have correctly and completely understood their needs.Requirements Analysis It describes how we progressively elaborate the solution defnition in order to enable the project team to design and build a solution that will meet the needs of the business and stakeholders.Solution Assessment and Validation Solution Assessment and Validation describes how to assess proposed solutions to determine which solution best fts the business need, identify gaps and shortcomings in solutions, and determine necessary workarounds or changes to the solutionRequirements Management and It describes how we manage conficts, issues andCommunication changes and ensure that stakeholders and the project team remain in agreement on the solution scope
  15. 15. Part 08: PROCESS MAPPING AND PERFORMANCE MODELBusiness and Process Entity Requirements DefinitionBUSINESS DEFINITION MATRIX MANDATE STAKEHOLDERS FUNCTIONS BUSINESS PRODUCTS CONTROLS ENTITY Core Functions Special Functions BUSINESS ENTITY BUSINESS PERFORMANCE PROCESS NAME RELATIONSHIPS LOCATIONS OBJECTIVESINFORMATION REQUIREMENT MAPPING BUSINESS PROCESS INFORMATION INFORMATION PROCEDURE RULES & INFORMATION INFORMATION ENTITY NAME SOURCE CAPTURE POLICIES REPORTING CUSTOMER FORM FORMPROCESS NAME: BUSINESS ENTITY: SOURCE INPUT ENTRY TASKS EXIT OUTPUT CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS VALIDATION AND VERIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
  16. 16. PROCESS MAPPING: SWIM LANEFUNCTION UNIT: PROCESS NAME: ACTOR TASKS LANE TASK LANE TASKS LANEActor 1 Step 1 - Start Step 4 Step 6 -EndActor 2 Step 2 Step 5Actor 3 Step 3Actors: The people, groups, teams, etc, who are performing the steps identified within the processProcess: he actual process and flow that is being tracked through its identified progression steps.Phases: These might reflect the phases of the project, different areas of the project, or any secondary set of key elements that the process flow needs to traverse to successfully complete this process.Symbols: These are the physical symbols used to graphically represent what is happening in any given step of the process.
  17. 17. Part 09: INFORMATION MATURITY MODEL MATURITY STAGE DESCRIPTIONSLEVEL 1 The organisation has no common information practices. Any pockets ofAware information management maturity that the organization has are based on the experience and initiatives of individuals.LEVEL 2 The organisation has little in the way of enterprise information managementReactive practices. However, certain departments are aware of the importance of professionally managing information assets and have developed common practices used within their projects. At the enterprise level, a level 2 organization reacts to data quality issues as they arise.LEVEL 3 The organisation has a significant degree of information managementProactive maturity. Enterprise awareness, policies, procedures, and standards exist and are generally utilized across all enterprise projects. At level 3, the information management practices are sponsored by and managed by IT.LEVEL 4 The organisation manages information as an enterprise asset. The business isManaged heavily engaged in information management procedures and takes responsibility for the quality of information that they manage. A level 4 organisation has many mature and best-in-class practices and utilizes audits to ensure compliance across all projects.LEVEL 5 The organisation considers information to be as much an enterprise asset asOptimized financial and material assets. A level 5 organisation has best-in-class information management practices that are utilized across all enterprise projects. The distinguishing characteristic of a level 5 organisation is the focus on continuous improvement. At level 5, all data management practices and assets are regularly measured and the results are analysed as the basis for process improvement.
  18. 18. Part 10: DATA AND APPLICATION MODELData DictionaryData dictionary is an organized collection of data elements names and definitions arranged in a table. Itprovides the reference for accurate, reliable, controllable, and verifiable data to be recorded indatabases. It makes both the users and owners to have correct and proper use and interpretation of data.It makes them share common understanding of the meaning and descriptive characteristics of the datathat will serve the information to be generated. ELEMENTS DESCRIPTIONSData Element Domain Name A data content topic, for example, a named data collection protocol – EMAP. Note there may be multiple domains or sub- domains within a particular data dictionary.Data Element Number (for reference A number associated with the data element name for use inin data model) technical documents.Data Element Name Commonly agreed, unique data element name. Note: there are likely to be multiple data element names for a particular domain.Data Element Field Name The name used for this data element in computer programs and database schemas. It is often an abbreviation of the Date Element Name (eg. Cellular Phone Number might be assigned a field name of Cell_Ph_No).Data Element Definition Description of the meaning of the data elementData Element Unit of Measure (uom) Scientific or other unit of measure that applies to the data element.Data Element Precision The level to which the data will be reported, eg 1 mile plus or minus .001 mileData Element Data Type The type of data (e.g. Characters, Numeric, Alpha-numeric, date, list, floating point).Data Element Size and Decimalization The maximum field length that will be accepted by the database together with any decimal points (e.g. 30(2)) refers to a field length of 30 with 2 decimal points).Field Constraints: Data Element is a Required fields (Y) must be populated. Conditional fields (C)required field (Y/N); Conditional Field must be populated when another related field is populated(C); or a “null” field (e.g. if a city name is required a zip code may also be required). “Not null” also describes fields that must contain data. “Null” means the data type is undefined (note: a null value is not the same as a blank or zero value).Default Value A value that is predetermined. It may be fixed or a variable, like current date and time of the day.Edit Mask (e.g. of actual layout) An example of the actual data layout required, (e.g. yyyy/mm/dd).Data Business Rules There are often the rules that define how data would be managed within an information system (e.g. Fish data could be coded (1=adult, 2=parr, 3=juveniles) and these codes would then be included in the data dictionary for use by developers and users. Other business rules, for example how rights to create, read, update or delete records are assigned if they are needed.
  19. 19. Application Use Case IdentificationA use case is a methodology used in system analysis to identify, clarify, and organize system requirements.The use case is made up of a set of possible sequences of interactions between systems and users in aparticular environment and related to a particular goal. It consists of a group of elements (for example,classes and interfaces) that can be used together in a way that will have an effect larger than the sum ofthe separate elements combined. The use case should contain all system activities that have significanceto the users. A use case can be thought of as a collection of possible scenarios related to a particular goal,indeed, the use case and goal are sometimes considered to be synonymous.A use case (or set of use cases) has these characteristics: • Organizes functional requirements • Models the goals of system/actor (user) interactions • Records paths (called scenarios) from trigger events to goals • Describes one main flow of events (also called a basic course of action), and possibly other ones, called exceptional flows of events (also called alternate courses of action) • Is multi-level, so that one use case can use the functionality of another one. -Defintion by TechTargetUse Case Identification ElementsKarl Weiger - www.processimpact.com. COMPONENTS DESCRIPTIONSUse Case ID Give each use case a unique integer sequence number identifier. Alternatively, use a hierarchical form: X.Y. Related use cases can be grouped in the hierarchy.Use Case Name State a concise, results-oriented name for the use case. These reflect the tasks the user needs to be able to accomplish using the system. Include an action verb and a noun. Some examples: • View part number information. • Manually mark hypertext source and establish link to target. • Place an order for a CD with the updated software version.Use Case History Created By: Supply the name of the person who initially documented this use case. Date Created: Enter the date on which the use case was initially documented. Last Updated By: Supply the name of the person who performed the most recent update to the use case description. Date Last Updated: Enter the date on which the use case was most recently updated.Use Case DefintionActors An actor is a person or other entity external to the software system being specified who interacts with the system and performs use cases to accomplish tasks. Different actors often correspond to different user classes, or roles, identified from the customer community that will use the product. Name the actor that will be initiating this use case and any other actors who will participate in completing the use case.Trigger Identify the event that initiates the use case. This could be an external business event or system event that causes the use case to begin, or it could be the first step in the normal flow.Description Provide a brief description of the reason for and outcome of this use case, or a high-level description of the sequence of actions and the outcome of executing the use case.
  20. 20. Preconditions List any activities that must take place, or any conditions that must be true, before the use case can be started. Number each precondition. Examples: 1. User’s identity has been authenticated. 2. User’s computer has sufficient free memory available to launch task.Postconditions Describe the state of the system at the conclusion of the use case execution. Number each postcondition. Examples: 1. Document contains only valid SGML tags. 2. Price of item in database has been updated with new valueNormal Flow Provide a detailed description of the user actions and system responses that will take place during execution of the use case under normal, expected conditions. This dialog sequence will ultimately lead to accomplishing the goal stated in the use case name and description. This description may be written as an answer to the hypothetical question, “How do I <accomplish the task stated in the use case name>?” This is best done as a numbered list of actions performed by the actor, alternating with responses provided by the system. The normal flow is numbered “X.0”, where “X” is the Use Case ID.Alternative Flows Document other, legitimate usage scenarios that can take place within this use case separately in this section. State the alternative flow, and describe any differences in the sequence of steps that take place. Number each alternative flow in the form “X.Y”, where “X” is the Use Case ID and Y is a sequence number for the alternative flow. For example, “5.3” would indicate the third alternative flow for use case number 5.Exceptions Describe any anticipated error conditions that could occur during execution of the use case, and define how the system is to respond to those conditions. Also, describe how the system is to respond if the use case execution fails for some unanticipated reason. If the use case results in a durable state change in a database or the outside world, state whether the change is rolled back, completed correctly, partially completed with a known state, or left in an undetermined state as a result of the exception. Number each alternative flow in the form “X.Y.E.Z”, where “X” is the Use Case ID, Y indicates the normal (0) or alternative (>0) flow during which this exception could take place, “E” indicates an exception, and “Z” is a sequence number for the exceptions. For example “5.0.E.2” would indicate the second exception for the normal flow for use case number 5.Includes List any other use cases that are included (“called”) by this use case. Common functionality that appears in multiple use cases can be split out into a separate use case that is included by the ones that need that common functionality.Priority Indicate the relative priority of implementing the functionality required to allow this use case to be executed. The priority scheme used must be the same as that used in the software requirements specification.Frequency of Use Estimate the number of times this use case will be performed by the actors per some appropriate unit of time.Business Rules List any business rules that influence this use case.Special Requirements Identify any additional requirements, such as nonfunctional requirements, for the use case that may need to be addressed during design or implementation. These may include performance requirements or other quality attributesAssumptions List any assumptions that were made in the analysis that led to accepting this use case into the product description and writing the use case description.Notes and Issues List any additional comments about this use case or any remaining open issues or TBDs (To Be Determineds) that must be resolved. Identify who will resolve each issue, the due date, and what the resolution ultimately is.
  21. 21. Part 11: TECHNOLOGY REFERENCE MODEL COMPONENTS CONFIGURATION ITEMS SPECIFICATIONSHardware PlatformsOperating SystemApplication SystemDatabase SystemNetwork & CommunicationSecurity SystemEnterprise System ManagementDevelopment MethodologiesStandardsInteroperatability
  22. 22. Part 12: INFORMATION SECURITY MODELThe Security Domain defines the roles, technologies, standards, and policies necessary to protect theinformation assets of the state and citizens from any form of unauthorized access. The Security Domaindefines the security and access management principles that are applied to ensure the appropriate level ofaccess to NM’s information assets. This domain comprises standards for identification, authentication,authorization, administration, audit, and naming services. COMPONENTS DESCRIPTIONSPHYSICAL SECURITY Securing access to hardware, inventory, and disposition of physical equipment and records.USER SECURITY Ensuring that users accessing data and systems are in fact who they say they are and that they have access only to authorized resources. Functions include the identification, authentication, and authorization of an individual, as well as audit requirements.APPLICATION SECURITY ensuring that an application that accesses another application or data is secure; includes the analysis of distributed, proxy, and middleware services.SYSTEMS SECURITY Overall systems security analysis, including the user, data transmission, and the host server, as well as remote links and access from other systems, and encryption.DATA SECURITY Both physical and logical data protection, including loss of data through mechanical failure, electrical failure, or viruses. Includes backup procedures, off-site storage, access audit.NETWORK SECURITY It includes the physical and electical links between the desktop and the host, LAN/WAN, use of internet, dial-up, wireless.SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Periodic reviews of policies, the design and review of systems (proposed or existing). Includes periodic testing of security plans. Generally, this is broken up between Administrators (who focus on individual systems) and an Information Security Officer (larger enterprise focus.)SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND Many techniques used to compromise systems are based on deceptiveHUMAN FACTORS practices aimed at individual users or employees. Security awareness must be heightened at all levels of the organization and procedures developed to positively identify requestors of information and their legitimate purposes.MALWARE Viruses, Trojans, spyware, and other malicious code.INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM coordinated incident response for miscellaneous incident that may occur across the state.
  23. 23. Part 13: MODEL OF STRATEGIC PLANNINGStrategic Alignment Model(Venkatraman, Henderson and Oldach)The difficulty to realize value from IT investments is firstly due to the lack of alignment between the business and ITstrategy of the organizations that are making investments, and secondly due to the lack of a dynamic administrative processto ensure continuous alignment between the business and IT domains.Strategy Execution This perspective views the business strategy as the driver of both organization design choices and the logic of IS infrastructure (the classic, hierarchical view of strategic management). T Management is strategy formulator op , IS Management is strategy implementer [Arrow 1] .Technology Potential This perspective also views the business strategy as the driver however involves the articulation of an IT , strategy to support the chosen business strategy and the corresponding specification of the required IS infrastructure and processes. The top management should provide the technology vision to articulate the logic and choices pertaining to IT strategy that would best support the chosen business strategy while the role of the IS manager should be that , of the technology architect - who efficiently and effectively designs and implements the required IS infrastructure that is consistent with the external component of IT strategy (scope, competences and governance). [Arrow 2]Competitive Potential This alignment perspective is concerned with the exploitation of emerging IT capabilities to impact new products and services (i.e., business scope), influence the key attributes of strategy (distinctive competences), as well as develop new forms of relationships (i.e. business governance). Unlike the two previous perspectives that considered business strategy as given (or a constraint for organizational transformation), this perspective allows the modification of business strategy via emerging IT capabilities. The specific role of the top management to make this perspective succeed is that of the business visionary who , articulates how the emerging IT competences and functionality as well as changing governance patterns in the IT marketplace would impact the business strategy The role of the IS manager in contrast, is one of the . , catalyst, who identifies and interprets the trends in the IT environment to assist the business managers to understand the potential opportunities and threats from an IT perspective. [Arrow 3]Service Level This alignment perspective focuses on how to build world class IT/IS organization within an organization. In this perspective, the role of business strategy is indirect. This perspective is often viewed as necessary (but not sufficient) to ensure the effective use of IT resources and be responsive to the growing and fast-changing demands of the end-user population. The specific role of the top management to make this perspective succeed is that of the prioritizer who , articulates how best to allocate the scarce resources both within the organization as well as in the IT marketplace (in terms of joint ventures, licensing, minority equity investments, etc.). The role of the IS manager in contrast, is one of business leadership, with the specific tasks of making the internai business , succeed within the operating guidelines from the top management. [Arrow 4]
  24. 24. The Test of Effective Strategy THE TESTS THE INDICATORSGoodness of Fit Test The stategy has to be well matched to industry and competitive conditions, market opportunities and threats, and other aspects of the enterprises external environment. It has to be tailored to the companys resource strengths and weaknesses, competencies, and competitive capabilities.Competetive Advantage Test The effective strategy leads to sustainable competitive advantage. The bigger the competitive edge that a strategy helps build, the more powerful and effective it is.Performance Test The effective strategy boosts company performance. Two kinds of performance improvements are the most telling of a strategys caliber: gains in profitability and gains in the companys competitive strength and long- term market position.The Type of Organizational GoalsStrategic Goals These are set of directives at the top of an organization and directly support the mission statement. Strategic goals are related to the entire organization instead of any one department.Tactical Goals These are goals and objectives that are directly related to the strategic goals of the organization. They indicate the levels of achievement necessary in the departments and divisions of the organization. Tactical goals and objectives must support the strategic goals of the organization.Operation Goals These are goals and objectives that are determined at the lowest level of the organization and apply to specific employees or subdivisions in the organization. They focus on the individual responsibilities of employees.Super-ordinate Goals These goals are important to more than one party. They are often used to resolveconflict between groups.
  25. 25. Part 14: STRATEGIC PLAN INTERROGATIVES • Internal and External Environment Scan. Internal (evaluation of capabilities) and external (forecast of the environment) research and analysis in order to identify strategic issues facing the institution. Driving Forces Restraining Forces Risks for Doing and Non-Doing the Strategy The cost of not mitigating the risks • Strategic Visioning: Definition of the desired future state of the organization within the targeted time frame. (Mandate+Mission+Values -Internal and External Environment Analysis • Strategic Goals Setting: Definition of what the organization wants to achieve based on their understanding of the prioritized gaps and possibilities to be managed by the different units of the organization It includes identification of the key performance indicators to track the progress of the plan, and document the achievement of the strategic vision. • Strategic Approaches and Actions : Statement of approaches that will be used to advance and achieve the stated goals • Initiatives: Identification of specific programs or projects to be elaborated in the planning cycles of the organization,and to fulfill the chosen strategies. The initiative is assigned to specific units of the organization for implementation. • Work Plan : Specification of tasks to execute the initiatives, it includes the program or project scope that indicates the who is responsible, when to happen, what are the high level requirements, and how much are resources to be used. • Strategic Outcomes: Tangible results to be realized in pursuing the strategy and actions. Outcome-Based objectives Specific and measurable statement of results to be achieved by the strategic plan in relation to its stakeholders perception, behavior, performance expectations, and competitions.
  26. 26. Part 15: ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING WORK PLANORGANIZE 1. Identify and engage the service of the Mentoring Consultant, Technical Consultants, Technical Facilitators and Researchers 2. Assist and coordinate with the AGENCY NAME ICT Services Strategic Planning Committee 3. Define and agree on the strategic planning framework, tasks and timetableDISCOVER 1. Set the organizational assessment framework for the strategic planning 2. Identify the specific issues or decisions that the strategic planning should address 3. Identify the information that must be collected 4. Conduct Focus Group Discussions on the situational assessment a. The Mandate, Laws and Standards b. Technical and Business Units and Business Processes c. Current Organizational Strategies and Limitations d. Best Practices and International Trends e. Future Organizational Strategies and Directions f. The Enterprise Architecture 3. Gather and create summary presentation of the information gathered from the key technical and business areas of the organization 4. Assess the information needs/requirements of the agency 5. Assess the existing IT infrastructure (i.e., hardware, software, network, special solutions/devices, etc.) as to its applicability and further useDEFINE 3. Revisit the mandate, mission, vision and values of the organization 4. Define the aim, goals, and objectives of ICT services aligned to the mission, vision, values, and business ends of the organization 5. Identity the strategic directions of the agency 6. Define the Enterprise Architecture aligned to the strategic directions 7. Define what it takes to realize the strategic directions 8. Define the ICT service projects or components of the business case 9. Define the metrics of success or key performance indicators 10. Define the best practice references 11. Identify the key areas of the plan requiring specific technical experts 12. Identify the necessary upgrades and replacements that must be made to the IT infrastructure using lifecycle management practices for infrastructure and technologies employed 13. Identify the information systems necessary to support the mandate of the AGENCY NAME. 14. Define other ICT projects that need to be included in the AGENCY NAME budget forecasts and to be prioritized within the next three (3) years. 15. Identify the criteria in the selection of the appropriate systems integration/solutions provider for the eventual implementation of the ISSP.DRAFT 1. Consolidate the input derived from the focus discussion and research 2. Design and develop the AGENCY NAME Enterprise Architecture (EA) document 3. Develop a three (3) year Information Systems Strategic Plan (ISSP) that would serve as the “blueprint” of AGENCY NAME in the various aspects of technology, solutions, IT strategies, IS strategies, IT manpower support and budgetary requirements, among others. 4. Ensure that the developed ISSP is in conformance to the requirements of the regulatory bodies in the Philippine Government primarily as it related to monitoring, approval and implementation of the ICT vision of the agency. 5. Prepare an ISSP that conforms to the NCC format (M.O. 2003-02) 6. Prepare the E-commerce Plan of the agency in support of the E-commerce Law so that the agency maximizes the use of the Internet in the various aspects of operational and strategic thrusts. 7. Prepare the ICT Projects Investment Roadmap that considers hardware, software and network infrastructure, information systems, and other ICT projects that need to be included in the AGENCY NAME budget forecasts and to be prioritized within the next three (3) years. 8. Conduct a stakeholders and users review 9. Revise and submit for final approvalIMPLEMENT 1. Define implementation and monitoring process of the project outcomes and recommendations 2. Facilitate the organizational definition of the Implementation Oversight Committee 3. Define and perform a technology transfer program to ensure that AGENCY NAME management and the corresponding staff of the agency understand the conceptual and operational aspects of the deliverables 4. Conduct training on ICT Project Management 5. Conduct training on ICT Subcontract Management
  27. 27. Part 16: STRATEGIC PLANNING INPUT AND THINKING TOOLSEnvironmental Scanning: 1. Strengths are internal factors that create value. 2. Weakness are internal factors that destroy value. 3. Opportunity are external factors that create value. 4. Threats are external factors that destroy value. THE S.W.O.T. MATRIXPERFORMANCE AREAS 1. STRENGTH 2. WEAKNESS 3. OPPORTUNITY 4. THREATSMandateOrganizationCulturePeopleServices/ProductsProcessDataApplicationICT ConfigurationICT SecurityICT Configuration Baseline: 1. Availability - The condition that the ICT asset is ready for use. 2. Reliability - The conditon that the ICT asset is able to perform its required functions under stated conditions for a specified period of time 3. End of life – The time when the ICT assets is deemed retire or obsolete. ICT ASSETS BUSINESS NUMBER AVAILABILITY RELIABILITY END OF LIFE LOCATION STATUS STATUSServersWorkstationsNetwork DevicesOperatingSoftwareServer ApplicationSoftwareWorkstationApplicationSoftwareSecurity SoftwareBandwidthServicesICT WorkerICT ExpertsService Providers
  28. 28. Strategic Goal Setting: 1. What do you want that you dont have? (Achieve) 2. What do you want that you already have? (Preserve) 3. What dont you have that you dont want? (Avoid) 4. What do you have now that you dont want? (Eliminate) THE STRATEGIC GOALS GRIDPERFORMANCE AREAS ACHIEVE ELIMINATE PRESERVE AVOIDMandateOrganizationCulturePeopleServices/ProductsProcessDataApplicationICT ConfigurationICT SecurityStrategic Actions: PERFORMANCE STRATEGIC GOALS ACTIVITIES KEY PERFORMANCE CRITICAL SUCCESS AREAS INDICATORS FACTORSMandateOrganizationCulturePeopleServices/ProductsProcessDataApplicationICT ConfigurationICT Security
  29. 29. Strategic Investments: STRATEGIC GOAL ACTIVITIES TIMELINES SERVICES/GOODS ESTIMATED REQUIREMENT BUDGETGoal 1:Goal 2:Goal 3:Goal 4:Goal 5:Strategic ICT Projects: STRATEGIC GOALS ICT PROJECT STAKEHOLDERS BUSINESS DELIVERABLES NAME REQUIREMENTSGoal 1:Goal 2:Goal 3:Goal 4:Goal 5:Strategic ICT Configuration Requirements: BUSINESS AREA ICT OBJECTIVES HARDWARE SOFTWARE SERVICESBusiness Area 1:Business Area 1:Business Area 1:
  30. 30. Part 17: STRATEGIC PLAN AUTHORING TEMPLATEExecutive SummaryPART 1: ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILEDEPARTMENT/AGENCY VISION/MISSION STATEMENT A.1. Mandate • Legal Basis • Functions A.2. Vision • End view statement of for the agency A.3. Mission • Statements of outcome directives for the agency A.4. Strategic Thrusts and Program • Strategic Thrust 1: o Program Item 1: o Program Item 2: o Program Item 3 • Strategic Thrust 2: o Program Item 4 o Program Item 5 o Program Item 6DEPARTMENT/AGENCY PROFILE B.1. Name of Designation Information Systems Planner • Plantilla Position • E-mail Address B.2. CURRENT ANNUAL BUDGET FUND SOURCES AMOUNTS GAA ODA Others: B.3. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE COMPONENTS COUNTS Employees Regional/Extension Offices Provincial Offices Other Offices:
  31. 31. B.4. ORGANIZATIONAL FUNCTIONAL CHART • Functional Flow Chart C. THE DEPARTMENT AND ITS ENVIRONMENT ▪ Functional interface chart D. PRESENT ICT SITUATION (STRATEGIC CHALLENGE) –AS-IS-STATUS AND GAPS • What are the mission/critical services –level and status of computerization • What is the availability and status of office automation • What is the availability and level of web presence • What is the state of people capability on ICT use • What is the availability status of computer resources against the number of employees and agency sites • What are the ICT reality against the business operation of the agency E. STRATEGIC CONCERNS FOR ICT USE E.1 DESCRIPTION: • What kinds of strategic gaps that information and communications technology shall be able to fill-in? • What kind of changes or improvement requirements that the use of ICT shall be able to enable? • What kind of agency risks that the use of ICT shall be able to mitigate? • In what functions of the agency that the use of ICT shall have high level of impact in terms of service quality, efficiency, timeliness, accountability and security? E.2 DETAILSMajor Functions Critical Problems Intended Use Management/Operating Of ICT Business SystemsBack Office - Human resource - Issues on personnel - Establish the networkedAdministrative Support management system record keeping based communication - Financial Management - Efficiency issues in system System the manual - Improved the business - Assets and Property recording and process through the use of Management System processing of the automated applications - Legal Management back office systems - Deploy ICT service System - Issues on the management applications - ICT Service Management service delivery and to insure capability and System support performance of the ICT Communication management of IT support units. Management System PART 2: NFORMATION SYSTEMS STRATEGY
  32. 32. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR INFORMATION SYSTEM input-storage-process-output-sharing modelDETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ICT PROJECTS ICT PROJECT 1: B.1.1 PROJECT NAME: Intranet System B.1.2 DESCRIPTION: The project entails the design and development of the secured network infrastructure that will connect physically all the functional units and responsible personnel into the agency-wide information system. On top of the secured network run the web-based communication, collaboration, content publication and file sharing applications. B.1.3 STATUS: ProposedDETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS NAME OF DESCRIPTION STATUS DEVELOPMENT COMPUTING SCHEME INFORMATION STRATEGY SYSTEM / SUBSYSTEMS EXISTING PROPOSEIntranet System Network None Out-source infrastructure to NONE NETWORKED run web based communication, collaboration, publication and file sharing applicationsIMPACT AND LINKAGES OF INFORMATION SYSTEM NAME OF IMPACTS LINKAGES INFORMATION SYSTEM / SUBSYSTEMS Strategic Thrusts Benefits Internal Users External & Programs Owner(s) User(s) User(s)
  33. 33. DATABASE REQUIRED Name of General Content Status Information Data Archiving, Storage, Media Database Description Systems ServedCommunication -e-mail NoneTransaction -attached files Communication -Network data storage systemDatabase -transaction and references Collaboration -voice and video systemDocument - textual NoneRepository - audio Knowledge -Network data storage systemDatabase -video Management -multimedia SystemNETWORK LAYOUT Network diagram of existing configuration and planned requirementsPART 3: INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONSICT SOLUTIONS OF THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Name of Information Systems ICT Solutions Existing ProposedCommunication & Collaboration None - structured cabling and networkSystem - intranet web server, application server, security server, database server, active directory server, web mail, ftp server, file server, and IP telephony exchange serverICT STRATEGY FOR PUBLIC ACCESS How will the public gains access to the service.PART 4: INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONSICT RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS A.1. HARDWARE ITEMS NUMBER OF UNITS EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTALComputerServersComputerWorkstations A.1.1 NETWORK AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ITEMS NUMBER OF UNITS EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTALNetwork ServerNetwork Hubs
  34. 34. A.1.2 DEPLOYMENT OF ICT EQUIPMENT NAME OF OFFICE/ ITEMS NUMBER OF UNITS ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS EXISTING PROPOSED A.2. SOFTWARE ITEM VERSION LICENSE NUMBER OF LICENSES TYPE TYPE EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTAL NetworkOperatingSystemDesktopOperatingSystemOfficeProductivitySuite A.3. ICT SERVICES TYPE NUMBER OF UNITS EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTAL A.4. ICT MANPOWER AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE A.4.1 DEPLOYMENT OF ICT EQUIPMENT TYPE NUMBER OF UNITS EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTAL
  35. 35. A.4.2 EXISTING ICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE A.4.3 PROPOSED ICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE A.4.4 .PLACEMENT OF THE PROPOSED ICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE IN THE AGENCY ORGANIZATION CHART A.4.5 ICT TRAINING NEEDS ICT COURSES NUMBER OF TARGET PARTICIPANTS TITLECLASSIFICATION DESCRIPTION YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTAL B.OTHER RESOURCES ITEMS NUMBER OF UNITS EXISTING YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 TOTALPART 5: DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT PROGRAM A. ICT PROJECTS IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE NAME OF ICT PROJECTS YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3
  36. 36. B. INFORMATION SYSTEMS IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE NAME OF INFORMATION / SUBSYSTEM /MODULES YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3SUMMARY OF INVESTMENT BUDGET / ITEM ACCOUNT FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS IN PESOS YEAR 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3TOTAL

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