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  • http://www.socialtimes.com/2011/03/john-mccain-and-john-kerry-propose-online-privacy-bill-of-rights/# 3/10 With no fewer than seven pieces of legislation circulating Congress, the issue of online privacy is back in the news, and hot on Capitol Hill.  The latest bills center on the most contentious topics, creation of a ‘Do Not Track’ mechanism that would allow consumers to ‘opt-out’ of targeted online advertising, and mobile privacy.  What are the proposals, and what do they mean for you? First on the docket is proposed legislation from Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John Kerry (D-Mass) that would create an “online privacy bill of rights,” the most significant sign yet of bipartisan support for efforts to curb the Internet-tracking industry. Politico’s “Morning Tech” was the first to obtain a copy of the working draft, and described it as such: “ It allows for an opt-out standard on personally identifiable information that’s not sensitive, and an opt-in feature when the data is especially sensitive. It’s an opt-in requirement also governing data transfer to third parties, As proposed, the Kerry-McCain bill would create the nation’s first comprehensive privacy law, covering data across all industries. Current laws cover only certain types of personal data, such as financial and medical information. . Also in the Senate, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) is moving forward with a bill that would regulate geolocation and mobile privacy. The senator told “Morning Tech” he’s “getting close to being able to offer it up,” but did not specify whether he would introduce it as a stand-alone effort or part of a larger package. Intro: AR is Virtual GPS Tech like Bump, NFC, IOT Tagwhat, Etc Checking into products: Show current slides and add StickyBits Self-aware (checking into yourself) – Show P&G app here, add one of the weight apps Checking into people: Facial recognition Data Recognition – your identify is more closely tied to your data than your face (police slide) Privacy VAR’s Brands checking into you – FB Sponsored Stories Kraft slide Tech to describe with GPS as the analogy.
  • http://www.socialtimes.com/2011/03/john-mccain-and-john-kerry-propose-online-privacy-bill-of-rights/# 3/10 With no fewer than seven pieces of legislation circulating Congress, the issue of online privacy is back in the news, and hot on Capitol Hill.  The latest bills center on the most contentious topics, creation of a ‘Do Not Track’ mechanism that would allow consumers to ‘opt-out’ of targeted online advertising, and mobile privacy.  What are the proposals, and what do they mean for you? First on the docket is proposed legislation from Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John Kerry (D-Mass) that would create an “online privacy bill of rights,” the most significant sign yet of bipartisan support for efforts to curb the Internet-tracking industry. Politico’s “Morning Tech” was the first to obtain a copy of the working draft, and described it as such: “ It allows for an opt-out standard on personally identifiable information that’s not sensitive, and an opt-in feature when the data is especially sensitive. It’s an opt-in requirement also governing data transfer to third parties, As proposed, the Kerry-McCain bill would create the nation’s first comprehensive privacy law, covering data across all industries. Current laws cover only certain types of personal data, such as financial and medical information. . Also in the Senate, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) is moving forward with a bill that would regulate geolocation and mobile privacy. The senator told “Morning Tech” he’s “getting close to being able to offer it up,” but did not specify whether he would introduce it as a stand-alone effort or part of a larger package. Intro: AR is Virtual GPS Tech like Bump, NFC, IOT Tagwhat, Etc Checking into products: Show current slides and add StickyBits Self-aware (checking into yourself) – Show P&G app here, add one of the weight apps Checking into people: Facial recognition Data Recognition – your identify is more closely tied to your data than your face (police slide) Privacy VAR’s Brands checking into you – FB Sponsored Stories Kraft slide Tech to describe with GPS as the analogy.
  • UTILITY VERSUS GIMMICK; TIME SAVING, ETC.
  • http://www.socialtimes.com/2011/03/john-mccain-and-john-kerry-propose-online-privacy-bill-of-rights/# 3/10 With no fewer than seven pieces of legislation circulating Congress, the issue of online privacy is back in the news, and hot on Capitol Hill.  The latest bills center on the most contentious topics, creation of a ‘Do Not Track’ mechanism that would allow consumers to ‘opt-out’ of targeted online advertising, and mobile privacy.  What are the proposals, and what do they mean for you? First on the docket is proposed legislation from Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John Kerry (D-Mass) that would create an “online privacy bill of rights,” the most significant sign yet of bipartisan support for efforts to curb the Internet-tracking industry. Politico’s “Morning Tech” was the first to obtain a copy of the working draft, and described it as such: “ It allows for an opt-out standard on personally identifiable information that’s not sensitive, and an opt-in feature when the data is especially sensitive. It’s an opt-in requirement also governing data transfer to third parties, As proposed, the Kerry-McCain bill would create the nation’s first comprehensive privacy law, covering data across all industries. Current laws cover only certain types of personal data, such as financial and medical information. . Also in the Senate, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) is moving forward with a bill that would regulate geolocation and mobile privacy. The senator told “Morning Tech” he’s “getting close to being able to offer it up,” but did not specify whether he would introduce it as a stand-alone effort or part of a larger package. Intro: AR is Virtual GPS Tech like Bump, NFC, IOT Tagwhat, Etc Checking into products: Show current slides and add StickyBits Self-aware (checking into yourself) – Show P&G app here, add one of the weight apps Checking into people: Facial recognition Data Recognition – your identify is more closely tied to your data than your face (police slide) Privacy VAR’s Brands checking into you – FB Sponsored Stories Kraft slide Tech to describe with GPS as the analogy.
  • Google goggles – idea of visual search being used for people + the GPS “voice”. You walk into a bar and say, “search for nearby blondes” then voice says, “you have reached your destination, but four people have complained about her on twitter and….”
  • We really fell in love with the LG smart fridge. You can input what types of items are inside your fridge (and where) by either dragging and dropping food or speaking to the fridge. The fridge then tells you how long you have until that food expires. Because the device is connected, you can check what is inside your refrigerator and how fresh (or un-fresh) your food might be from the grocery store. Show a slide with the tweeting fridge: idea is that it can scan what products you have so you don’t rebuy them. Plus you can tell your social graph what you’re eating. Plus it can tell you if it’s not good for your health, etc. “Don’t buy that.” Stacy: why go to the supermarket at all? “I like to touch the produce.” Talk about the EZPass idea at store. Not just self checkout, but just walk around to buy stuff using NFC and ecommerce.
  • Jon Froehlich, University of Washington
  • Jon Froehlich, University of Washington
  • www.grindr.com Uses GPS to tell your location and locate others.
  • visual analysis technology linking facial recognition to social media. Viewdle sits between the camera and the user analysing faces in the camera stream, identifying them, then offering links to Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, and other social media platforms. A user can identify and tag people in pictures & videos then pass the information to their social networks. As they tag others the software learns to recognize them, and can even share these new visual profiles with other users. The live view also offers an augmented reality tagging overlay that reveals information about the people around you.
  • Eye Tracking
  • The aggregated credibility score is shown as a percentage and a total number of comments in the hovercard that appears when a user is moused over in the Social Commenting plugin. Through extensive testing, we’ve determined that the percentage is calculated using the formula  (total Likes – total instances marked as unhelpful or spam) / total Likes. For instance, a commenter who has had their comments Liked seven times and been marked as unhelpful once would have the equation (7 – 1) /7, which equates to 85%. Scores are rounded down and are higher than the equation specifies when there are less than five Likes. Users and admins will be able to look at this credibility score and deduce whether a certain comment is from a reputable source. Trolls and spammers will accrue a low score or have a low number of total comments, indicating their comments aren’t worth replying to, and their links shouldn’t be clicked. High quality users will build a high score and large number of comments over time.
  • http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20153-augmented-reality-iphone-helps-police-track-suspects.html PICTURE the scene: armed police officers are warned on their radios that a suspected male terrorist has been tracked to a crowded football stadium. Even with a full description, it's all but impossible to pick him out amid the match-day melee. Perhaps smartphones fed augmented reality (AR) data by the police control centre could help focus the search. After booting up an iPhone app, an officer would train the phone's camera on the crowd. The suspect's position, after he had been tracked by covert police, would be highlighted by an icon overlaid on the image. Similarly, other icons could pinpoint the positions and range of other officers (see picture), including those operating undercover. The system, called iAPLS, has been developed by engineers at Frequentis, a surveillance-systems company based in Vienna, Austria. It is a mobile extension of the firm's Automatic Personal Location System, which shows the location of officers on control-room screens using GPS signals sent by their radios. If a suspect has a cellphone that police have a fix on, or they are being closely followed by a covert officer, they too can be tracked. Officers can also use their phone to "tag" the location of a suspect package to make it visible to fellow law enforcers. What Frequentis engineer Reinard van Loo and his colleagues have done is package APLS data so that it can be sent via a regular 3G link to a standard iPhone, making location information available to all officers on duty, not just those in the control room. The extra data that this kind of AR app will provide could be a double-edged sword, warns David Sloggett, a security researcher at the University of Reading, UK. "Terrorists have been very good at turning our own technology against us. The Mumbai attacks [in India in 2008] were meticulously planned on Google Earth, for instance. If terrorists get hold of police location data on mobile phones it could be disastrous." Stopping criminals hijacking AR data will require strongly encrypted data links. While the Frequentis demonstration system used a regular 3G network, van Loo says that by the time it is commercialised it could be using an encrypted emergency-services-only 4G network - known as LTE for Public Safety. Pauline Neville-Jones , the UK's Home Office minister for security and counterterrorism, believes AR could be a game-changing technology for the police and the military and so has commissioned Logica, a Reading-based technology company, to carry out 12 months of tests against what she calls "realistic security threats" using a range of AR systems at the University of Nottingham. "We want to know how effective augmented reality can actually be in helping us fight threats," she says. The AR offerings include visors that overlay data on an officer's field of view. For instance, BAE Systems in Rochester, Kent, is re-engineering a visor it makes for helicopter gunships – in addition to projecting a green glow around human targets sensed via infrared camera, it will also display the kind of data Frequentis is generating. And Trivisio of Kaiserslautern, Germany, is using miniature accelerometers similar to those found in cellphones to make an ultra-lightweight visor that tracks head motion with high accuracy, says spokesman Gerrit Spaas. For police officers tracking targets via helicopter, Churchill Navigation of Boulder, Colorado, is augmenting live helicopter video with terrain-contoured street maps in real time. Without this, says founder Tom Churchill, it is hard for pilots looking at a maze of streets on screen to know which street a target is in. It works by tightly coupling the map database to the software that controls the camera's motion. Meanwhile, James Srinivasan and his colleagues at 2d3 in Oxford, UK, are working on a system that ensures search teams cover all the ground when searching for improvised explosive devices – whether that's in a shopping mall or on a dirt track in Afghanistan. Twin cameras trained on the search team allow the system to generate computer images of the paths they have trodden, which are then overlaid on the video feed, allowing an operator to spots areas they have missed.
  • Wrap up talking about dinner with Gabe, etc.
  • NACMG prezo

    1. 1. NACMG UNLOCKING TRANSFORMATIONAL INNOVATION AUGMENTED REALITY FOR MARKETERS: FUTURE OF CONSUMER INTERACTIONS John C. Havens – EVP, Social Media Porter Novelli
    2. 4. The Outernet
    3. 5. AR is the GPS…
    4. 6. … for your virtual life.
    5. 8. MedSpeak
    6. 10.
    7. 11.
    8. 13.
    9. 14.
    10. 15.
    11. 16. Augmented - The Big Picture
    12. 18.
    13. 19.
    14. 20.
    15. 21.
    16. 22.
    17. 23. Checking In To Products
    18. 24. Visual Search
    19. 27. Products Checking In To You
    20. 29.
    21. 30.
    22. 31. Kraft / Anonymous Video Analytics (AVA)
    23. 32. You Checking In To Yourself
    24. 33. Activity Interference Source: Jon Froehlich, University of Washington
    25. 34. Activity Interference Source: Jon Froehlich, University of Washington
    26. 35. You Checking In To Others
    27. 36.
    28. 38.
    29. 40.
    30. 42.
    31. 43.
    32. 45. Virtual Advertising Rights
    33. 48. Hyper AR
    34. 50. John C. Havens [email_address] @johnchavens

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