Emotional Intelligence A better understanding of EQ and the business case for implementation.
 
<ul><li>“ We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle </li></ul>
Emotional Intelligence: Definitions <ul><li>Emotional Intelligence “is the capacity for recognizing or own feelings and th...
Emotional Intelligence: Components
Emotional Intelligence: Components
 
Business Case for EQ <ul><li>“ In Hard times, the soft stuff often goes away. But emotional intelligence, it turns out isn...
Business Case for EQ <ul><li>Neuroplasticity:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ New studies show that brain changes can be generate...
 
B usiness Case for EQ <ul><li>Emotion can lead to our worst decisions or our best ones: the difference is emotional intell...
Business Case for EQ: A Corporate Bibliography General Electric Global Deloitte World Bank United States Nave and Air Forc...
Business Case for EQ: Results
 
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The Business Case for implementing EQ-i and EQ360's inside an organization.

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Proposal that explores and attempts to justify the structure, value and benefit on implementing SMART goals aligned with specific EQ growth and development pathways.

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  • Happiness is…….
  • Emotions can be anything and everything!
  • Charles Darwin first noted and published his observations on EQ in 1870’s as it related to survival and adaptation. Edward Thorndike established and noted concept of “Social Intelligence” in 1920’s David Wechsler, one of the fathers of modern IQ testing, established and pushed for need to measure “non-intellective aspects of general intelligence” in 1940’s. Fast forward to 1983 and Harvard University professor Howard Gardner who famously wrote and published a paper detailing “multiple intelligences”. 1980’s Reuven Bar-On establishes concepts of EQ and designs measurement instruments. 1990’s The tem Emotional Intelligence is formally defined by John Mayer of University of New Hampshire and Peter Salovey of Yale. They expand on Gardner&apos;s concept. 1995 Daniel Goleman publishes book on EQ NOTE that on Harvard Business Review site, the most requested article of all time is his 1997 article focusing on EQ
  • Emotional Intelligence Model established and identified by Reuven Bar-On, PhD. There are 4 key components that have a total of 13 subcomponents(15 total are measure when we add in General Mood on next slide).
  • The previous 4 components contribute and impact General Mood. General Mood then ultimately influences and dictates effective performance.
  • Add that this quote can be applied to our industry with elevating competitiveness. It can also be related to our interactions among our peers and customers. Perform “problem” exercise with volunteer. Insert my past examples of how I handled these types of elements; account specific as well as customer specific. Demonstrate how things have evolved.
  • Establish the premise that what we think about can become a reality. Therefore if we can shift our thinking and focus on areas that EQ had identified as areas of enrichment (opportunities for growth) then we can influence oyer relationships with others. This is driven by conscious choice and requires increased self-awareness.
  • You get back what you put in. Clinical data shows that we can develop and grow new neuro pathways. Therefore when we identify new behaviors that we want to work on, if we focus and make a conscious effort to improve then WE CAN.
  • Reference and have available the 35 page report on EQ business case. Also reference the eiconsortium.org report highlighting some of the same data, but in a key 19 point format.
  • Specific Results by organization included the following: US Air Force 3 million annual savings on recruiting process by EQ identification by success traits. Based on these results, the Department of Defense implemented it throughout all branches. Consulting Firm partners increased by 139% incremental gain on profit vs. others within firm. Star Performers identified at over 15 global companies showed all high in 6 EQ competencies. L’Oreal increased sales with EQ by 2.5 million annually. Sheraton increased market share by 24%. PepsiCo gained increase of 10% more productivity in executives coached on EQ. 87% reduction in turnover=4 mill in savings 3.75 mil added economic value &gt;1000 percent ROI Amex instituted a 3 day EQ program and those salespeople that attended produced 2% more than non-attendees. Again a 3 day course. High EQ, specifically optimism, MetLife salespeople outsold other rep by 37%. Companies employing EQ development and enrichment tend to: Have 50% lower turnover Have 56% MORE customer loyalty 38% more overall productivity 27% higher profitability
  • The Business Case for implementing EQ-i and EQ360's inside an organization.

    1. 2. Emotional Intelligence A better understanding of EQ and the business case for implementation.
    2. 4. <ul><li>“ We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” </li></ul><ul><li>Aristotle </li></ul>
    3. 5. Emotional Intelligence: Definitions <ul><li>Emotional Intelligence “is the capacity for recognizing or own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.” </li></ul><ul><li>Daniel Goleman, 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional Intelligence “has to do with the ability to read the political and social environment, and landscape them; to intuitively grasp what others want and need, what their strengths and weaknesses are; to remain unruffled by stress; and be engaging, the kind of person others want to be around.” </li></ul><ul><li>Steve Stein and Howard Book, 2006 </li></ul>
    4. 6. Emotional Intelligence: Components
    5. 7. Emotional Intelligence: Components
    6. 9. Business Case for EQ <ul><li>“ In Hard times, the soft stuff often goes away. But emotional intelligence, it turns out isn't so soft. If emotional obliviousness jeopardizes your ability to perform, fend off aggressors, or be compassionate in a crisis, no amount of attention to bottom line will protect your career. Emotional intelligence isn’t a luxury you can dispense with in tough times. It is a basic tool that, deployed with finesse, is key to professional success.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Harvard Business Review, “Breakthrough Ideas for Tomorrow’s Business Agenda” April 2003 </li></ul></ul>
    7. 10. Business Case for EQ <ul><li>Neuroplasticity: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ New studies show that brain changes can be generated by mental activity: merely thinking about playing the piano leads to measureable, physical change in the brain’s motor cortex, and thinking about thoughts in certain ways can restore mental health.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From the book “Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain: how a new science reveals our extraordinary potential to transform ourselves.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharon Begley, Wall Street Journal Science Writer, 2007 </li></ul></ul>
    8. 12. B usiness Case for EQ <ul><li>Emotion can lead to our worst decisions or our best ones: the difference is emotional intelligence. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Business Case for Emotional Intelligence, sixseconds 2008 </li></ul></ul>
    9. 13. Business Case for EQ: A Corporate Bibliography General Electric Global Deloitte World Bank United States Nave and Air Force Department of Defense Kaiser American College of Healthcare Executives Center for Creative Leadership Eli Lilly Bank of Montreal BMW Boeing Avon American Express Financial Advisors Hilton Honeywell Johnson and Johnson Lockheed Martin Microsoft United Sates Marines Amgen Roche Pharmaceutical Toyota 3M PepsiCo *Medtronic
    10. 14. Business Case for EQ: Results

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