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2015 respirators ppe

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For the council safety council 145 class

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2015 respirators ppe

  1. 1. Respirators John Newquist Draft 2 22 2015
  2. 2. Standard Overview • Definitions • Program Requirements • Selection • Medical Evaluation • Fit Testing • Maintenance/Use • Training • Recordkeeping
  3. 3. Definitions Pretest A. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter B. Immediately dangerous to life of health (IDLH) C. Negative pressure respirator D. Oxygen deficient atmosphere E. Positive pressure respirator F. Powered air-purifying respirator G. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) H. Supplied-air respirator (SAR) I. Escape-only respirator J. Tight-fitting facepiece
  4. 4. December 2014 • Evanston IL • $132,000 to six contractors • OSHA's inspection found that onsite asbestos consultant directed the HVAC contractor to cut and remove 60 feet of piping that contained asbestos insulation without PPE. Typical asbestos pipe.
  5. 5. • PPE Assessment • Payment • Training • Audit Overview
  6. 6. Payment • Employers pay for almost all personal protective equipment that is required by OSHA’s general industry standards. • Metatarsal foot protection; • Rubber boots with steel toes; • Non-prescription eye protection; • Hard hats/Bump Caps; • Hearing Protection; • Personal fall protection; and • Reflective work vests. • It does not require payment for uniforms, items worn to keep clean, or other items that are not PPE. • Sturdy work shoes; • Non-specialty slip-resistant, non-safety-toe footwear; • Prescription Eye wear
  7. 7. Some Caveats • PPE is used as a last resort • The use of PPE signifies that the hazard could not be controlled by other methods, such as: – administrative controls (i.e., shift rotation) – engineering or industrial hygiene controls
  8. 8. Back to the caveats... • The use of PPE signals that the hazard still exists in the workplace • Unprotected individuals in the same area will be exposed • Failure of PPE means that the worker will be exposed • PPE can be combined with other controls
  9. 9. Clean Air Paradox • Quality of Air • 78.1% Nitrogen • 20.9% Oxygen • 0.9% Argon • 0.03% Carbon Dioxide
  10. 10. Units Seem Small 1 % = 10,000 ppm PEL = Permissible Exposure Limits (OSHA) 5 Mg/M3 is very small 2 f/cc = 2,000,000f/M3
  11. 11. Health Effects • Irritation • Asphyxiation • Organ Specific Effects • Mutagen • Teratogen • Acute/Chronic • Reversible vs. Nonreversible
  12. 12. Factors • Genetics • Age • Health status • Route of entry • Frequency and duration of exposure
  13. 13. Exposure Limits • Animal Studies • Epidemiological studies • Industrial Experience • STEL – 15 minutes • Ceiling – never exceeded • Threshold Limit Value
  14. 14. Sampling • Qualified person • Appropriate instrument • Duration of sampling • Pre and post calibration
  15. 15. Hierarchy of Controls • Engineering • Administrative • Personal Protective Equipment • Training
  16. 16. Lead • Requires compliance with 1910.1025 • Overexposure can occur in less than 5 minutes when torch cutting or painting
  17. 17. Lead effects • Chronic overexposure - severe damage to the blood-forming, nervous, urinary, and reproductive systems • High levels will require medical removal • Bridge Painting/Removal continues to be ones of the consistent lead issues in construction
  18. 18. Silica • Cutting, hammering, drilling, blasting can create high silica levels • Use wet methods and wear respirators • One of the oldest occupational diseases
  19. 19. Silica • 150-200 deaths a year (2009) • 1150-1200 deaths a year (1968) • Yet….one company had 3 silicosis and 10x+ severe respiratory diseases Gauley Bridge in 1920’s had workers die in months.
  20. 20. Copper Fumes - Welding • Copper is inhalation hazard affecting respiratory system • Mild steel (red iron) and carbon steel contain manganese • Manganese may cause Parkinson's disease What do you see?
  21. 21. Total Dust • All the things not regulated. • Good, bad, or indifferent? • Air blowing!
  22. 22. Iron Oxide -Welding • Metal fume fever • Direct Draw or forced ventilation should be used • Personal Protective Equipment should be used • Bystanders should be protected as well
  23. 23. Carbon Monoxide • Generators are most common problem of CO • Heaters out of tune are another cause • CO TWA is 50 ppm • Others set levels 25 ppm
  24. 24. Hex Chrome • Stainless steel contains nickel and chromium • Plating, grinding, welding are problems • Some cements
  25. 25. Cadmium • Overexposure to cutting cadmium bolts, coated poles • Torch cutting should never be used • Use hydraulic bolt cutters • Comply with 1926.1127 Cadmium bolts are often found in sprinkler pipe use.
  26. 26. Methylene Chloride • Paint stripping • Parts cleaners • Cancer causing
  27. 27. Asbestos • Common Fireproofing material used pre- 1980s • Found in pipe insulation, ceiling tiles, and floor tiles • Must comply with 1926.1101 or 1910.1001
  28. 28. June 2014 • The asbestos lawsuit that saw a $1 million award • Richard Rost has Mesothelioma • Defendants included Ford Motor Company (Ford), General Electric, Westinghouse and Ingersoll- Rand. • However, the latter three defendants settled with the plaintiffs out of court, before the trial had an opportunity to begin. Overall, nearly 3,000 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma each year in the United States, which represents 0.02 percent of all U.S. cancer cases.
  29. 29. Respiratory Protection • 1910.134 – Written program #2 – Medical evaluation #1 – Fit testing #3, #6 – Selection, Evaluation of exposure #5 – Maintenance, Storage, and Care #9 – Annual Training #8 – Program evaluation #10 – Beards #7 Voluntary use App D - #4
  30. 30. Written Program Requirements Program Elements: • Selection procedures • Medical Evaluations • Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators • Proper use procedures - routine & emergency • Procedures & schedules for maintenance • Supplied air quality & quantity • Hazards Training - routine & emergency • Respirator use training • Program auditing
  31. 31. Selection of Respirators • Employer must select and provide an appropriate respirator based on the respiratory hazards
  32. 32. Uses/Limitations • Will only work with corresponding filters or cartridges • Can protect you from hazardous levels of materials • If worn properly and in the right atmosphere, respirators can save your life
  33. 33. Uses / Limitations Never use an air purifying respirator: • If Oxygen level is below 19.5% or above 21% • in an IDLH atmosphere; • for ABRASIVE BLASTING; • for FIRE FIGHTING; • which is not APPROVED for the contaminant of concern; • with FACIAL HAIR.
  34. 34. October 2014
  35. 35. Ebola
  36. 36. Ebola
  37. 37. On The Horizon • Silica? • Noise? • Confined Space in Construction?
  38. 38. Protection Factors
  39. 39. Respiratory protective equipment Selection of suitable type by competent person Factors: • nature of hazards • measured concentrations • period of exposure • vision • communications • confined spaces • personal suitability
  40. 40. Respiratory protective equipment Training in the use of equipment must be given Stored in a clean place with protective enclosure
  41. 41. Respiratory protective equipment Disposable face mask: • light, comfortable, cheap • one user only • eight hour maximum use, but less if high dust levels • dispose of after use • May not be ok for silica • Not for lead and asbestos
  42. 42. Respiratory protective equipment Half-mask dust respirator: • easily maintained • freedom of movement • may have ‘shelf life’ • colour coded cartridges
  43. 43. Anatomy of a half-mask respirator
  44. 44. Respiratory protective equipment • High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) dust respirator: • full face protection • correct fitting and use • beards, spectacles, etc. may lessen efficiency
  45. 45. Respiratory protective equipment Positive pressure powered respirator: • for long periods of work • pump and filter • approximately seven hours use • air leaks go outwards • requires battery and filter maintenance
  46. 46. Respiratory protective equipment Helmet and visor respirator: • battery-operated fan and filter • comfortable • not for all hazards • requires maintenance schedules
  47. 47. Confined Space SAR
  48. 48. Self-contained Air Supply for Escape. Supplied air respirators are not to be used in an atmosphere which is immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) unless it is equipped with a self-contained air supply for escape.
  49. 49. Air Created by an Oil Lubricated Compressor? • For oil-lubricated compressors, the employer shall use a high- temperature or carbon monoxide alarm, or both, to monitor carbon monoxide levels. • If only high-temperature alarms are used, the air supply shall be monitored at intervals sufficient to prevent carbon monoxide in the breathing air from exceeding 10ppm
  50. 50. Compressor Citation
  51. 51. Hose Length • The total system length can be up to 350 ft. with 100 ft. maximum from the pump to the respirator and 250 ft. from the pump to the inlet filter.
  52. 52. Respiratory protective equipment Compressed airline breathing apparatus: • mask or hood with compressed airline • requires pure air at correct pressure, humidity and temperature • air hose can restrict movement
  53. 53. Respiratory protective equipment Self-contained breathing apparatus: • mask, air regulator and cylinder • used only by a trained person • selected by competent person • cylinder duration is 20 – 30 minutes
  54. 54. Evaluation • "The employer shall identify and evaluate the respiratory hazard(s) in the workplace; this evaluation shall include a reasonable estimate of employee exposures to respiratory hazard(s) and an identification of the contaminant's chemical state and physical form • Does not require air sampling but……
  55. 55. Training Requirements • Training must be provided prior to use • Retraining is required annually, and when: – changes in the workplace or type of respirator render previous training obsolete – there are inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge or use – any other situation arises in which retraining appears necessary
  56. 56. IDLH Training
  57. 57. Voluntary Use Requirements (other than filtering facepiece respirator) • Medical evaluations • Maintenance, Cleaning, Storage • Appendix D • The basic advisory information in Appendix D must be provided to employees who wear respirators when use is not required by this standard or by the employer
  58. 58. Voluntary Use Requirements (Filtering facepiece only) Appendix D only: • Read and Heed all instructions • Use approved respirators • Properly selected • Keep track of your respirator
  59. 59. #1 1910.134(e)(1) • The employer shall provide a medical evaluation to determine the employee's ability to use a respirator, before the employee is fit tested or required to use the respirator in the workplace. • The employer may discontinue an employee's medical evaluations when the employee is no longer required to use a respirator
  60. 60. Medical Evaluation Requirements • Evaluation completed prior to wearing respirator • Annually thereafter • Evaluation include information in Sections 1 and 2, Part 1 Of Appendix C • Conducted by a physician or licensed health care professional
  61. 61. Medical Signs and Symptoms • The following are signs or symptoms that may prevent the use of a respirator: – Seizures – Claustrophobia – Asthma – Emphysema – Pneumonia – Collapsed Lung – Lung Cancer – Broken Ribs – Chest Injuries/Surgeries – Any other lung problems – Heart or Circulation problems – Anxiety
  62. 62. Fit Testing Quantitative fit testing uses a machine to measure the actual amount of leakage into the face piece and does not rely upon your sense of taste, smell, or irritation in order to detect leakage The fit test shall be administered using an OSHA-accepted QLFT or QNFT protocol. Fit test not done before use. #6 Fit test not done annually #3
  63. 63. Fit Testing • Qualitative fit testing is normally used for half- mask respirators - those that just cover your mouth and nose. • Half-mask respirators can be filtering facepiece respirators - often called "N95s" - as well as elastomeric respirators.
  64. 64. TSI Qfit • Qualitative respirator fit tester is the only OSHA- compliant (29CFR 1910.134) automated pump-driven nebulizer for Bitrex and Saccharin to qualitatively test the integrity of respirators to the specific users wearing them.
  65. 65. User Seal Check An action conducted by the respirator user to determine if the respirator is properly seated to the face. Positive Pressure Check Negative Pressure Check
  66. 66. User Seal Check
  67. 67. Training Requirements • Training must be provided prior to use, unless acceptable training has been provided by another employer within the past 12 months • Retraining is required annually, and when: – changes in the workplace or type of respirator render previous training obsolete – there are inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge or use – any other situation arises in which retraining appears necessary • The basic advisory information in Appendix D must be provided to employees who wear respirators when use is not required by this standard or by the employer
  68. 68. Employee Responsibilities • Dirty respirator • Wear PPE when necessary and required • Attend PPE training sessions annually • Care for, clean, maintaining, and dispose of PPE properly. • Report any damaged or defective PPE immediately.
  69. 69. Respirator Defective
  70. 70. Cleaning Protocol • Dismantle • Wash • Rinse • Drain • Sanitize • Rinse • Dry • Reassemble • Test 1. Hypochlorite solution or 2. Aqueous solution of iodine or, 3. Other manufacturer cleansers
  71. 71. Maintenance and Care • Clean and disinfect at the following intervals: – as often as necessary when issued for exclusive use – before being worn by different individuals when issued to more than one employee – after each use for emergency respirators and those used in fit testing and training
  72. 72. Storage • Protect Respirator from: – Dust – Sunlight – Damaging chemicals – Heat – Extreme cold – Excessive moisture
  73. 73. Inspection • Dirt • Cracks • Tears • Holes • Distortion • Broken parts • Missing parts • Elasticity • Corrosion • Valve test
  74. 74. Problems?
  75. 75. Questions?
  76. 76. Background • Classes: OSHA 10/30 Hour, Incident Investigation, Confined Space, Excavation Safety, Cranes Signaling and Rigging, Fall Protection, Scaffold Safety, and many more • Services: Mentoring new safety professionals, Mock OSHA Inspections, Site Safety Audits, OSHA Litigation Consultation, Expert Witness, Reducing Worker Compensation Risk, Improving Site safety 76 • 34 years working with top companies to achieve ZERO injuries • Certified Safety Professional • OSHA 1983-2012 • Founding Member of ANSI Z359 • 815-354-6853 • Johnanewquist@gmail.com

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