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Ultrasonic cavitation and implosion self presenting

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Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Cavitaton

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Ultrasonic cavitation and implosion self presenting

  1. 2. Sound . . . Sound Is Vibration Transmitted Through an Elastic Material UltraSound . . . Sound at a Higher Frequency Sound UltraSound
  2. 3. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration Think of the black line above as the edge view of a metal plate
  3. 4. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration Now Imagine an “Ultrasonic Transducer” Attached to the Metal Plate Ultrasonic Transducer
  4. 5. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate Ultrasonic Transducer
  5. 6. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  6. 7. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  7. 8. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  8. 9. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  9. 10. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  10. 11. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  11. 12. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  12. 13. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  13. 14. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  14. 15. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  15. 16. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  16. 17. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  17. 18. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  18. 19. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  19. 20. Now Imagine that the Metal Plate is the Bottom of a Vessel or “Tank”
  20. 21. Now Imagine that the Metal Plate is the Bottom of a Vessel or “Tank”
  21. 22. And that the Tank is Filled with Liquid
  22. 23. And that the Tank is Filled with Liquid
  23. 24. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  24. 25. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  25. 26. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  26. 27. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  27. 28. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  28. 29. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  29. 30. As the tank bottom raises, it pushes against the liquid thereby compressing it. The blue represents an area of “compression”.
  30. 31. The “compression” continues to travel through the liquid away from the source of vibration.
  31. 40. As the tank bottom lowers it “pulls” on the liquid creating an area of negative pressure or “rarefaction”
  32. 41. Continued vibration generates areas of compression and rarefaction radiating through the liquid
  33. 65. Now add a pressure gauge to measure pressure at a given point in the liquid + - 0
  34. 66. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
  35. 67. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
  36. 68. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
  37. 69. 0 + -
  38. 70. 0 + -
  39. 71. 0 + -
  40. 72. 0 + -
  41. 73. 0 + -
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  44. 76. 0 + -
  45. 77. 0 + -
  46. 78. 0 + -
  47. 79. 0 + -
  48. 80. 0 + -
  49. 81. 0 + -
  50. 82. 0 + -
  51. 83. 0 + -
  52. 84. 0 + -
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  55. 87. 0 + -
  56. 88. 0 + -
  57. 89. 0 + -
  58. 90. 0 + -
  59. 91. A vibrating source transmits sound waves to a liquid. Sound waves, consisting of areas of rarefaction (negative pressure) and compression (positive pressure), radiate through the liquid away from the source of vibration.
  60. 92. 0 Imagine now a small defect in the liquid consisting of a bubble or speck of dirt . + -
  61. 93. . 0 The a “cavitation bubble” starts to grow around the defect under influence of negative pressure + -
  62. 94. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  63. 95. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  64. 96. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  65. 97. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  66. 98. 0 + -
  67. 99. The “cavitation bubble” shrinks under the influence of growing positive pressure 0 + -
  68. 100. 0 + -
  69. 101. 0 The catastrophic collapse of the cavitation bubble under increasing pressure results in implosion! + -
  70. 102. 0 The high energy resulting from the implosion of millions of cavitation bubbles do the work associated with ultrasonics + -

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