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Responding to extended writing electronically v3

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Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks

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Responding to extended writing electronically v3

  1. 1. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks John Blake Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  2. 2. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Abstract Technology-enhanced marking not only saves time but also saves paper. This presentation aims to share a system for responding electronically to extended writing. Although many teachers use correction codes and concise comments, research (e.g. Hyland & Hyland, 2006) shows that students who are working alone frequently misunderstand such comments. This integrated system solves that problem by drawing eclectically on a variety of tools. The Microsoft insert comment function is used for facilitative responses. By adding shortcut codes and corresponding comments to the autocorrect function, detailed unambiguous feedback can be generated in a few keystrokes. Mistakes are categorized into one of three categories slips, errors and attempts (Edge, 1990) . Slips are simply identified for writers to correct themselves. More detailed guidance is provided for errors via inserted comments, hyperlinks or objects, such as sound or video files while the track change function is used to provide the correct form for attempts. Fillable forms and the Microsoft spike tool are also used to add end comments.
  3. 3. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Introduction Situation: necessity to respond to writing Problems: • responding to writing is time consuming • students frequently misunderstand pithy comments Solution: Harness technology to save time and increase clarity of comments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  4. 4. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Overview 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1 2 “Correction” policy Core features in Microsoft word Cool features in Microsoft word Tips and tricks for formative comments Tips and tricks for summative comments 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  5. 5. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks “Correction” policy Correction policies vary according to teaching philosophies, institutional requirements, course aims, etc. Type Description of mistake Correction policy Slips Mistakes that students can correct Errors Mistakes in language that students can understand but not correct themselves Attempts Mistakes in language beyond student`s level. Identify error using insert comment function Explain error using insert comment function Ignore error OR change error using track changes Edge, J. (1990). Mistakes and correction. Harlow: Longman. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  6. 6. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Features in Microsoft Word Despite my preference for OS, no other text editor offers tools that compete with the Review and Developer tabs in MS Word 2010. Core features Track changes Insert comment 1 2 Cool features Autocorrect Spike Fillable forms 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  7. 7. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Core feature 1: Track changes Tip: Type ctrl + shift + E to start track changes Alterations are coloured and deletions tagged. Author then chooses to accept or reject changes. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  8. 8. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Core feature 2: Insert comments Tip: Write clear and comment sentences. Tip: To insert comment: ctrl + alt + M 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  9. 9. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Cool feature 1: Autocorrect Tip: Add frequently used sentences to comment bank Type thsi  this Tip: Create codes that are easy to remember and do not occur in normal language Type .gpt  When referring to past events or states, use past tense, e.g. Subjects were interviewed in September. Tip: to add entry 1 2 3 4 5 File 6 7 Options 8 9 10 Proofing 11 12 13 14 15
  10. 10. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Cool feature 2: Spike Spike – multiple cut and then paste all at once Tip: to cut:Ctrl + F3 Tip: to paste: Ctrl + Shift + F3 Tip: This is for cutting not copying 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  11. 11. Responding to extended writing electronically: tips and tricks Cool feature 3: Fillable forms • Great for making slightly different comments for each student, following the same format. Perfect for feedback on assessed assignments. Tip: too add Developer tab File Options Customize ribbon Tip: to add Fillable form File 1 2 3 4 Developer 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  12. 12. Examples: track changes Tip: This is probably the fastest way to correct 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  13. 13. Examples: insert comment Tip: Check your comments for careless mistakes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  14. 14. Examples: insert code and autocorrect to comment Tip: Personalise the autocorrected comments to the student, by adding or changing examples 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  15. 15. Examples: insert url in comment Tip: insert url to online example, evidence or explanation. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  16. 16. Example: using fillable form Tip: Perfect tool to justify grade with reference to assessment criteria. Tip: Protect the form to avoid accidental altering 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  17. 17. Example: using Spike Structure of endcomments Tip: Use Spike to create 5-sentence individualised end-comments in 30 seconds • Overall summary • Writing skills - Strengths • Writing skills - Weaknesses • Advice • Closing comment Tip: Save comment bank as new file before starting to avoid accidental loss. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  18. 18. Any questions, suggestions or comments? John Blake johnb@jaist.ac.jp

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