Cultivation of African WalnutTetracarpidium Conophorum Mull. (Arg) onAgricultural Plantation: An Approach toConservation A...
• Over 90% of the 1.2  billion people living in  extreme poverty depend  on forests for livelihoods  (World Bank, 2007).
The loss of biological diversity fromclearing of forests for agricultureand plantation establishment hasbeen emphasized.  ...
Cultivation of forest productson agricultural plantation hasbeen recognised as acontribution to ConservationAgriculture   ...
Aim of the study• Determine contributions of forest  products to Conservation Agriculture  with special focus on African w...
African walnut Tetracarpidium conophorum (Müll. Arg.) Hutch. & Dalziel• Family Euphorbiaceae;• Perennial climber;• Found i...
Some benefits of African walnut • Nuts   ▫ Proved to cure male fertility problem • Oil from nuts  ▫ Used in formulation of...
Methodology
Data collection• Questionnaire to rural farmers and  local marketers• Farm visit
Map of the study area
Productionof the walnut
Production of African walnut• Nut planted under indigenous trees deliberately spared on agricultural lands and plantations...
African walnut is a climber which is planted under indigenous tree species within agricultural plantation e.g. cocoa
Climber of African walnut on crown of some indigenous trees on agricultural plantation (thereby conserving the trees)
Processingof the walnut
Matured fruits allow to drop               from climber           Gathering of fruits        Women, children (& farmers)  ...
• Decaying stages of African walnut fruit
Marketingof the walnut
Chart for marketing of the walnut
Villagemerchant Bags of African walnut  ready for transport
Marketing ofAfrican walnut(Retail)
Application of African walnutto Conservation Agriculture• Conserve indigenous tree species.  ▫ Prevent felling• Decay frui...
Mature fruits and climber ofwalnutClimber with many    Decaying Mature fruitsleaves               and leaves
Issues forDevelopment of the walnut
Issues for development• Producers: Small scale farmers at the local level• Industrial utilisation: Not fully developed. ▫ ...
Issues for devt…• Lack of adequate storage facilities ▫ Consumed within 1-2 days after cook• Inadequate transportation ▫ d...
Food for thought• Let us recognize more and incorporate  Indigenous Knowledge to CA.• “When a knowledgeable old person die...
Acknowledgements• International Foundation for Science  (IFS), Sweden: ▫ Research Fund• Travel Sponsorship: ▫ Australian C...
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Cultivation of African walnut Tetracarpidium Conophorum Mull. (Arg) on agricultural plantation: an approach to CA in Nigeria. Folaranmi Babalola

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Cultivation of African walnut Tetracarpidium Conophorum Mull. (Arg) on agricultural plantation: an approach to CA in Nigeria. Folaranmi Babalola

  1. 1. Cultivation of African WalnutTetracarpidium Conophorum Mull. (Arg) onAgricultural Plantation: An Approach toConservation Agriculture in NigeriaFolaranmi D. Babalola (Ph.D.)Forest Resources Management,University of Ilorin, Nigeria.folababs2000@yahoo.com,babalola.fd@unilorin.edu.ng
  2. 2. • Over 90% of the 1.2 billion people living in extreme poverty depend on forests for livelihoods (World Bank, 2007).
  3. 3. The loss of biological diversity fromclearing of forests for agricultureand plantation establishment hasbeen emphasized. IUCN Photo Library © Jim Thorsell
  4. 4. Cultivation of forest productson agricultural plantation hasbeen recognised as acontribution to ConservationAgriculture IUCN Photo Library © Jim Thorsell
  5. 5. Aim of the study• Determine contributions of forest products to Conservation Agriculture with special focus on African walnut.
  6. 6. African walnut Tetracarpidium conophorum (Müll. Arg.) Hutch. & Dalziel• Family Euphorbiaceae;• Perennial climber;• Found in moist forest zones of sub-Sahara Africa;• Cultivated principally for the nuts (cooked and consumed as snacks).
  7. 7. Some benefits of African walnut • Nuts ▫ Proved to cure male fertility problem • Oil from nuts ▫ Used in formulation of wood varnish, vulcanized oil for rubber and leather substitute. • Leaves ▫ used for the treatment of dysentery (Ajaiyeoba and Fadare, 2006).
  8. 8. Methodology
  9. 9. Data collection• Questionnaire to rural farmers and local marketers• Farm visit
  10. 10. Map of the study area
  11. 11. Productionof the walnut
  12. 12. Production of African walnut• Nut planted under indigenous trees deliberately spared on agricultural lands and plantations• Starts fruiting 2 years• Fruits July – Sept• Processing is at household level
  13. 13. African walnut is a climber which is planted under indigenous tree species within agricultural plantation e.g. cocoa
  14. 14. Climber of African walnut on crown of some indigenous trees on agricultural plantation (thereby conserving the trees)
  15. 15. Processingof the walnut
  16. 16. Matured fruits allow to drop from climber Gathering of fruits Women, children (& farmers) Fruits Fruits Cut open with knife orRot and nuts washed cutlass and nuts removed
  17. 17. • Decaying stages of African walnut fruit
  18. 18. Marketingof the walnut
  19. 19. Chart for marketing of the walnut
  20. 20. Villagemerchant Bags of African walnut ready for transport
  21. 21. Marketing ofAfrican walnut(Retail)
  22. 22. Application of African walnutto Conservation Agriculture• Conserve indigenous tree species. ▫ Prevent felling• Decay fruit mesocarp improves soil fertility.• High litter fall that improve soil fertility. ▫ enhance function of soil microbs.
  23. 23. Mature fruits and climber ofwalnutClimber with many Decaying Mature fruitsleaves and leaves
  24. 24. Issues forDevelopment of the walnut
  25. 25. Issues for development• Producers: Small scale farmers at the local level• Industrial utilisation: Not fully developed. ▫ …hampering full scale production and exploration of inherent potentials.
  26. 26. Issues for devt…• Lack of adequate storage facilities ▫ Consumed within 1-2 days after cook• Inadequate transportation ▫ deplorable rural road networks.
  27. 27. Food for thought• Let us recognize more and incorporate Indigenous Knowledge to CA.• “When a knowledgeable old person dies, a whole library disappears”.
  28. 28. Acknowledgements• International Foundation for Science (IFS), Sweden: ▫ Research Fund• Travel Sponsorship: ▫ Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) in partnership with Australian Government AusAIDs International Seminar Support Scheme
  29. 29. Thank you for listening

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