Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Open Innovation: A Research Agenda

850 views

Published on

Closing plenary by Joel West from Day 1 of the World Open Innovation Conference in Napa, California, on December 4, 2014

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Open Innovation: A Research Agenda

  1. 1. Open Innovation: A Research Agenda Joel West World Open Innovation Conference December 4, 2014
  2. 2. 2006 agenda • Multiple levels of analysis – Individual: least studied – Organizational: most studied • Not-for-profit unstudied – Value network and ecosytems – Industry/sector – National institutions • Incentives (to create, to participate) Source: West, Vanhaverbeke, Chesbrough (2006)
  3. 3. 2014 agenda Four papers offer 2014 research agenda: •West & Bogers, J. Prod. Innovation Mgmt. •West, Salter, Vanhaverbeke & Chesbrough, Research Policy •Chesbrough & Bogers, Ch. 1 of New Frontiers in Open Innovation •Vanhaverbeke, Chesbrough & West, Ch 15 of NFOI See: blog.openinnovation.net, 27 Oct 2014
  4. 4. 1. Levels of Analysis • Individual/group (West & Piller, 2014) • Project (Du et al, 2014; Vanhaverbeke et al, Ch. 6 of NFOI) • Firm/organization: still most studied • Network, ecosystem: (West Ch. 4 of NFOI) • Community (West & Lakhani, 2008) • Industry/sector: (Christensen, 2006) • National/supranational (Chesbrough & Vanhaverbeke, 2011) • Today: Session 3-2 (ecosystems) Source: West et al (2014), Vanhaverbeke et al (2014)
  5. 5. 2. More on Integration Research on inbound open innovation •Emphasizing 1st step: sourcing – Search – Enabling/filtering – Acquiring •Missing 2nd and 3rd step – Integrating – Commercializing Source: West & Bogers (2014)
  6. 6. 3. Better measurement • Previously: – OI originated with case studies – Many CIS studies spawned by Laursen & Salter (2006) – Patent data (e.g. Fabrizio, 2009) • Opportunities for – New to the world measures (e.g., Dahlander & Piezunka, 2014) – New to OI measures (e.g. Belderbos et al, 2014; Du et al, 2014) • Today: Session 2-2 (does OI pay?) Source: West et al (2014)
  7. 7. 4. Tie to extant theory • Salter: Open innovation “did not itself seek to directly align to existing underpinning theories in these fields” • Vanhaverbeke & Cloodt (Ch. 14): – Link of OI “funnel” to the role of the firm – Transaction: less costs, more value – Less resources, more relational – Importance of dynamic capabilities – Open innovation as real options • Today: Session 2-1 Source: West et al (2014), Vanhaverbeke et al (2014)
  8. 8. 5. Nonpecuniary motivations • Identified early (Chesbrough, SMR 2003; West et al, 2006) • More general model of nonpecuniary: inbound and outbound nonpecuniary flows (Dahlander & Gann, 2010) • NGO, GO apply OI in a different way (Chesbrough and Di Minin, Ch. 9 of NFOI) • Today: Di Minin (3-1) Source: West et al (2014)
  9. 9. 6. Role of Appropriability • OI inspired by Teece (1986) framework • Key reality for pecuniary modes (West, 2006; Dahlander & Gann, 2010) – What is the role of informal appropriability? (Laursen & Salter, 2014) • Blending of OI and non-proprietary “open” – Openness as a profitable OI strategy (Henkel et al, 2014) • Today: Session 3-1 (IP); Wadhwa (1-1) Source: West et al (2014)
  10. 10. What’s Next • Semi-open wine (and beer) – Drink tickets – Cash bar • 6pm next door (in lunch room) • 12 poster sessions • Comment on a poster, get a ticket

×