Chapter 8 Section 2<br />Fungi<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />A.  Characteristics of Fungi:<br />Fungi can be food sources or ingredients; they can also grow on ...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Classification of Fungi<br />Most fungi are saprohphytes.<br />Feeding on dead or decaying material...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />How do Fungi Eat?<br />Fungi eat by secreting enzymes to digest the food outside itself; then the f...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Fungi can reproduce both sexually and asexually. <br />In asexual reproduction, cell division produ...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Classification of Fungi<br />Fungi are classified into four groups(our book uses three major classi...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Club Fungi: Phylum Basidiomycota<br />Mushrooms (example)<br />Produce spores in a club shaped stru...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Club Fungi<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Hen of the woods AKA Ram’s head mushroom<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Part of A Mushroom<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Sac Fungi:  Phylum Ascomycota<br />Yeasts, morels, and truffles (examples)<br />Sac Fungi produce s...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Sac Fungi: Phylum Ascomycota<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Imperfect Fungi: Phylum Deuteromycota<br />Some fungi like penicillin, are called imperfect because...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Zygote Fungi:Phylum Zygomycota<br />A zygospore fungus produces spores in a round case called a spo...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Zygote Fungi:Phylum Zygomycota<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Lichens<br />Lichens are organisms composed of a fungus and either a green alga or a cyanobacterium...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Lichens<br />
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Fungi and Plants<br />Some fungi form a hyphae network with plant roots called mycorrhizae, this ma...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Importance of Fungi<br />Some fungi, such as cultivated mushrooms, are food sources. <br />Many fun...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />Red Tides<br />A population explosion of dinoflagellates<br />In 1987 there was a red tide from Flo...
Section 2:  Fungi<br />New Zealand  Red Tide<br />
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Chapter 8 section 2 (2011)

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Chapter 8: Protists and Fungi
Section 2: Fungi

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  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Read page 226 and pg 227 in your textbook
  • Chapter 8 section 2 (2011)

    1. 1. Chapter 8 Section 2<br />Fungi<br />
    2. 2. Section 2: Fungi<br />A. Characteristics of Fungi:<br />Fungi can be food sources or ingredients; they can also grow on spoiling food or in damp places like shower curtains. <br />Can break down dead organisms.<br />Scientists are not sure how fungi are related to other organisms. <br />Threadlike tubes called hyphae produce enzymes for digestion. <br />
    3. 3. Section 2: Fungi<br />Classification of Fungi<br />Most fungi are saprohphytes.<br />Feeding on dead or decaying material. <br />Some fungi are parasites<br />obtaining their food directly from living things. <br />Saprophytes and parasites do not make their own food!!!<br />They do not have roots or chlorophyll. <br />
    4. 4. Section 2: Fungi<br />How do Fungi Eat?<br />Fungi eat by secreting enzymes to digest the food outside itself; then the fungus cells absorb the digested food. <br />Most fungi are saprophytes, except:<br />Ringworm and Athletes foot (parasites)<br />Fungi grow best in warm, dark, humid areas.<br />
    5. 5. Section 2: Fungi<br />Fungi can reproduce both sexually and asexually. <br />In asexual reproduction, cell division produces spores. (without fertilization)<br />In sexual reproduction, the hyphae of two genetically different fungi of the same species produce spores that differ genetically from both parents. <br />
    6. 6. Section 2: Fungi<br />Classification of Fungi<br />Fungi are classified into four groups(our book uses three major classifications) based on the type of structure formed by the joining of hyphae. <br />Club Fungi<br />Sac Fungi<br />Zygote Fungi<br />Imperfect Fungi<br />
    7. 7. Section 2: Fungi<br />Club Fungi: Phylum Basidiomycota<br />Mushrooms (example)<br />Produce spores in a club shaped structure called a basidium; located on gills of mushroom. (slits under the cap of the mushroom).<br />Important food source for animals. <br />NEVER EAT WILD MUSHROOMS. <br />1. They can be DEADLY!!!<br />
    8. 8. Section 2: Fungi<br />Club Fungi<br />
    9. 9. Section 2: Fungi<br />Hen of the woods AKA Ram’s head mushroom<br />
    10. 10. Section 2: Fungi<br />Part of A Mushroom<br />
    11. 11. Section 2: Fungi<br />Sac Fungi: Phylum Ascomycota<br />Yeasts, morels, and truffles (examples)<br />Sac Fungi produce spores in a small, saclike structure called an ascus; yeasts can also reproduce by budding. <br />Sac fungi cause diseases such as Dutch Elm Disease. <br />Yeast can reproduce 2 ways<br />Spores<br />Budding<br />Yeasts are used in baking.<br />
    12. 12. Section 2: Fungi<br />Sac Fungi: Phylum Ascomycota<br />
    13. 13. Section 2: Fungi<br />Imperfect Fungi: Phylum Deuteromycota<br />Some fungi like penicillin, are called imperfect because they have never been observed reproducing sexually or they only reproduce asexually. <br />Examples<br />Penicillum<br />Ringworm<br />Athletes Foot<br />
    14. 14. Section 2: Fungi<br />Zygote Fungi:Phylum Zygomycota<br />A zygospore fungus produces spores in a round case called a sporangium found on the tip of the hyphae. <br />When sporangia splits open 100s of spores are released into the air. If it lands in an OK environment it forms more mold.<br />Examples: <br />1. Bread Molds, fruit molds, and all molds. <br />
    15. 15. Section 2: Fungi<br />Zygote Fungi:Phylum Zygomycota<br />
    16. 16. Section 2: Fungi<br />Lichens<br />Lichens are organisms composed of a fungus and either a green alga or a cyanobacterium, they can appear crusty, leafy, or grow upright. <br />The fungus and cyanobacteria live together and both benefit. <br />Lichens can be an important food source for animals. <br />Lichens help rocks weather, or break down. <br />Since lichens are sensitive, they help scientists monitor pollution levels. <br />
    17. 17. Section 2: Fungi<br />Lichens<br />
    18. 18. Section 2: Fungi<br />Fungi and Plants<br />Some fungi form a hyphae network with plant roots called mycorrhizae, this may have allowed plants to move from water to land about 500 million years ago. <br />The fungus helps the plant absorb more of certain nutrients from the soil better than the roots can on their own. <br />Certain plants cannot grow without the development of mycorrhizae. <br />
    19. 19. Section 2: Fungi<br />Importance of Fungi<br />Some fungi, such as cultivated mushrooms, are food sources. <br />Many fungi, cause animal and plant diseases, but they also produce antibiotics, such as penicillin, which can fight disease. <br />Fungi are important decomposers, recycling organic matter. <br />
    20. 20. Section 2: Fungi<br />Red Tides<br />A population explosion of dinoflagellates<br />In 1987 there was a red tide from Florida to Massachusetts<br />Each dinoflagellate releases a different toxin – fish & shellfish eat them – people eat them causing illness & death<br />Occurs when surface becomes heated & underlying water is cold<br />
    21. 21. Section 2: Fungi<br />New Zealand Red Tide<br />

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