Chapter 6 section 1 (views of earth)

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Chapter 6 Section 1: Landforms

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Chapter 6 section 1 (views of earth)

  1. 1. Chapter 6: Views of EarthSection 1: Lanforms<br />Mr. MotukGeneral Science<br />
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  3. 3. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />I. Views of Earth<br />Landforms<br />A landform is a general feature of Earth’s surface. <br />3 Basic Landforms<br />Plains: Large, relatively flat areas. <br />Plateaus: Relatively flat, raised areas. <br />Mountains: Elevated surface features. <br />
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  5. 5. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Plateaus<br />A plateau is a raised relatively flat area of land. <br />Composed of horizontal bedrock uplifted by natural forces. <br />Characterized by high, vertical cliff boarders. <br />Example: Colorado Plateau<br />Most famous is the Grand Canyon<br />
  6. 6. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Plains<br />Plains are divided into two types. <br />Coastal Plains: <br />Broad areas along the oceans shore <br />Sometimes called lowlands due to minimal elevation. <br />Characterized by rolling hills, swamps, and marshes. <br />Interior Plains<br />Land locked, relatively flat, lowland areas. <br />With thick fertile soil, plains are ideal for farming<br />Usually between mountains and ranges. <br />
  7. 7. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Mountains<br />Mountains rise high above the surrounding land. <br />Mt. Everest is the highest mountain peak (in the Himalayan Mountains), 8,800 meters above sea level. (29,029 ft)<br /> Four main ways that mountains form:<br />Folding<br />Upwarping<br />Fault Block<br />Volcanic Activity<br />
  8. 8. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Folded Mountains<br />Formed by extreme opposing horizontal pressure. <br />Like squeezing a pimple!!!<br />Layers buckle and fold. <br />Example: Appalachian Mountains<br />Formed 300 to 250 million years ago. <br />Oldest and longest mountain range in North America.<br />Originally higher than the Rocky Mountains. <br />Weathering and Erosion have reduced the height.<br />Minersville: 1184 ft (yes we are in the Appalachian Mountain range!)<br />
  9. 9. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Folded Mountains<br />
  10. 10. Appalachian Mountains<br />
  11. 11. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Up-warped Mountains<br />Form by extreme upward forces. <br />Erode exposing igneous and metamorphic bedrock. <br />Characterized by sharp peaks and ridges. <br />Examples<br />Southern Rocky Mountains<br />Black Hills (South Dakota)<br />Adirondack Mountains (New York)<br />
  12. 12. Chapter 5 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Upwarped Mountains<br />
  13. 13. Chapter 5 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Fault Block Mountains<br />Tilted faults slide diagonally in opposing directions. <br />Fault: A fracture in the continuity of a rock formation caused by a shifting or dislodging of the earth's crust, in which adjacent surfaces are displaced relative to one another and parallel to the plane of fracture. Also called shift.<br />Characterized by jagged peaks.<br />Examples<br />Grand Tetons (Wyoming)<br />Sierra Nevada Mountains (California)<br />
  14. 14. Chapter 5 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Fault Block Mountains<br />
  15. 15. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />Volcanic Mountains<br />Lava flows and produces a massive cone of igneous rock. <br />Examples<br />Mount St. Helens (Washington State)<br />Mauna Loa (Hawaii)<br />
  16. 16. Chapter 6 Section 1<br />Types of Mountains<br />United States Elevations<br />Highest Continental U.S<br />Mount Whitney, California (14,494 ft)<br />Highest U.S<br />Mt. McKinley, Alaska (20,320 ft)<br />Lowest Elevations<br />Death Valley , California (282 ft below sea level)<br />New Orleans, Louisiana (64 ft below sea level)<br />Highest Pennsylvania Point: Mt. Davis (3,213 ft)<br />Lowest World Elevation: Dead Sea (1,349 ft below sea level)<br />

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