The Global Collapse of Information Integrity

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The social web isn't about content; it's more about content sharing, liking and repinning. Why is there so little original content and so much clicking, and what is the benefit of the current ecosystem?

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  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brian-honigman/100-fascinating-social-me_b_2185281.htmlThe Google +1 button is used 5 billion times per day250 million photos are uploaded to Facebook every day175 million tweets575 likes and 81 comments by Instagram users every secondPinterest over 80% of pins are re-pins
  • Later, the AP said the hack attack “came after hackers made repeated attempts to steal the passwords of AP journalists.”The market quickly recouped its losses after the hacking was confirmed.The shadowy Syrian Electronic Army, which backs that country’s brutal dictator and has been waging a cyber war against his opponents, claimed credit for the sick prank.“Ops! @AP get owned by Syrian Electronic Army!” the group tweeted to claim responsibility.Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/ap-twitter-account-hacked-suggest-white-house-bombing-article-1.1325243#ixzz2RyK9AUhd
  • The benchmark S&P 500 index also fell nearly 1pc in the space of three minutes as the tweet hit the markets. With the S&P valued at roughly $14.6 trillion at the moment of the false tweet, that three-minute plunge briefly wiped out $136.5bn (£92.2bn) of the index's value, according to Reuters. “Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barack Obama is injured,” said the fake “alert” from one of America’s most trusted news sources, briefly fooling some news outlets and sending the Dow Jones plunging 145 points in the space of two minutes — or 1pc.
  • TMZ tweets imminent death, “last rites” for lilwayneLil Wayne and management company report he’s OKLil Wayne soars on Social 50, highest rating since October, 2012
  • Now in Blogs, Product Placement, New York Times, June 13Thus far, the commission has focused on marketers, Ms. Engle said, though it could also pursue individual bloggers under the law. (There is no investigation in the Absolut vodka case so far.) A promotion in January by Ann Taylor Loft — submit a blog post about the summer 2013 collection and receive a gift of up to $500 — was the first to be investigated by the commission. While no action was taken, marketers viewed the case as a shot across the bow.
  • Affiliate programs are perhaps the single most insidious hidden effect on the integrity of social media and all online communications. Affiliate advertising rewards bloggers, web site owners and others for driving traffic to goods and services for sale. In some cases, affiliate programs pay members when a click results in a sale. In other cases, members are paid by the click. For example, I belong to several affiliate programs like Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Borders. If you were to go directly to Amazon and do a search to find my SocialCorp book, here is the link Amazon would use:http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=socialcorp&x=0&y=0If you were to go to my blog and click the link to buy the book on Amazon, here is what you would get:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321580087?tag=socialized-20The “socialized-20” at the end indicates that the click to Amazon came from my blog. If you were to buy the book, I would get a commission. It doesn’t matter that I am the author. Here’s where it gets interesting. If you click the link, look at the book, decide not to buy it, but then, on the same visit to Amazon, you buy a Crank II BluRay DVD, custom wheels and a vacuum cleaner, I get commissions on all of those sales, since I was technically responsible for sending you to Amazon.This has nothing to do with me being the author of the book. Anyone can sign up to be an affiliate. Why is this a problem? Let’s say I have a book review blog, reading and recommending the latest business books, and I am an Amazon affiliate. Given that I am basically being paid by Amazon to recommend books, that is, I get a commission every time someone reads my blog and then clicks over to Amazon to buy a book I’ve recommended, how can you trust my reviews? I would have a monetary incentive to give all positive reviews. And why not add espresso machines to my reviews? And infant car seats? Affiliate programs constitute hidden financial arrangements that compromise the integrity of editorial all over the web.There are a couple of other things that happen. with affiliate programs. First, people sign up for Twitter and create blogs just to publish affiliate links under false pretenses. You might see a tweet or a blog post linking to “Five Great Ways to Grow Your Business Online” but if you click the link, you end up at a Viagra or dating site. And all of that spam you’re getting? The majority is intended to generate clicks on affiliate links. I would guess that affiliate advertising is the number one source of spam, followed by identity theft and mischief making. I am not sure why people aren’t angry about affiliate advertising and the mess it makes, or why the FTC hasn’t cracked down here.
  • This tweet appears to be from an individual Twitter account. It actually goes to the DISH Network home page shown in the next slide (and not a page where a user can view the so-called “astronaut commercials.”) This is either a DISH Network employee or an affiliate marketer. The shortened URL is also a problem for consumers since it masks the domainof the destination site. This undisclosed advertisement is probably in violation of FTC endorsement rules.
  • Yelp has constantly eroded its position as the hyperlocal source for user-generated reviews. The company has hired professional writers to generate reviews, but worse still is the announcement in February, 2013, that the company was the target of a class action suit for alleged extortion in a scheme where it offered to suppress poor reviews for businesses who paid a $300 monthly fee. When something is no longer what it says it is, consumers move on. These kinds of mistakes reduce brand equity, and ultimately cost the company far more real dollars than they earned from being devious.
  • The English common law understood something of commerce, but did not anticipate the complexities of the modern, publicly traded corporation with its responsibilities to shareholders, employees and regulators. As corporate law evolved, the law often gave corporations “personhood,” that is, bestowed upon corporations human attributes and behaviors as a way of understanding and regulating them.Joel Bakan, in the book and movie The Corporation, maintains that corporations are people, but their behavior is psychopathic. This may a bit extreme in the typical corporation, but it helps to understand why corporations, and the people in them, behave they way they do.At the top, the corporation is driven by revenue, growth and profitability. These are the things Wall Street wants. Senior executives are measured, compensated and sometimes fired on the basis of these measures.Amongst the rank and file, the typical managers and individual contributors, performance management, the process of ranking all employees based on their performance and value to the company, drives similar behaviors.If an employee, for example, runs one of the company’s advertising programs, he/she might hear of a new method for improving the number of consumers who respond to an ad. The employee will be driven by the need to meet the goals of the performance management plan, and not primarily by ethical considerations. After all, employees who don’t measure up, will not be considered for raises and promotions, may be the first selected when there is a layoff, and may find themselves “managed out” of the company. Ultimately, people may be faced with decisions that require choosing between ethical behavior and behavior that will go toward helping them stay employed (feed, house and clothe their family).And in most corporations, there is no incentive for ethical behavior.
  • A reporter from Alex Jones’ Infowars.com website found himself being verbally destroyed by a resident on the streets of Boston over claims that the recent bombings had been the result of a so-called “false flag” operation carried out by the U.S. government. (Staged by the FBI)In the YouTube video posted on Friday, a man can be heard tearing into Infowars.com reporter Dan Bidondi over “right wing conspiracy theories.”http://youtu.be/-2xhg_vPP6s
  • The English common law understood something of commerce, but did not anticipate the complexities of the modern, publicly traded corporation with its responsibilities to shareholders, employees and regulators. As corporate law evolved, the law often gave corporations “personhood,” that is, bestowed upon corporations human attributes and behaviors as a way of understanding and regulating them.Joel Bakan, in the book and movie The Corporation, maintains that corporations are people, but their behavior is psychopathic. This may a bit extreme in the typical corporation, but it helps to understand why corporations, and the people in them, behave they way they do.At the top, the corporation is driven by revenue, growth and profitability. These are the things Wall Street wants. Senior executives are measured, compensated and sometimes fired on the basis of these measures.Amongst the rank and file, the typical managers and individual contributors, performance management, the process of ranking all employees based on their performance and value to the company, drives similar behaviors.If an employee, for example, runs one of the company’s advertising programs, he/she might hear of a new method for improving the number of consumers who respond to an ad. The employee will be driven by the need to meet the goals of the performance management plan, and not primarily by ethical considerations. After all, employees who don’t measure up, will not be considered for raises and promotions, may be the first selected when there is a layoff, and may find themselves “managed out” of the company. Ultimately, people may be faced with decisions that require choosing between ethical behavior and behavior that will go toward helping them stay employed (feed, house and clothe their family).And in most corporations, there is no incentive for ethical behavior.
  • The English common law understood something of commerce, but did not anticipate the complexities of the modern, publicly traded corporation with its responsibilities to shareholders, employees and regulators. As corporate law evolved, the law often gave corporations “personhood,” that is, bestowed upon corporations human attributes and behaviors as a way of understanding and regulating them.Joel Bakan, in the book and movie The Corporation, maintains that corporations are people, but their behavior is psychopathic. This may a bit extreme in the typical corporation, but it helps to understand why corporations, and the people in them, behave they way they do.At the top, the corporation is driven by revenue, growth and profitability. These are the things Wall Street wants. Senior executives are measured, compensated and sometimes fired on the basis of these measures.Amongst the rank and file, the typical managers and individual contributors, performance management, the process of ranking all employees based on their performance and value to the company, drives similar behaviors.If an employee, for example, runs one of the company’s advertising programs, he/she might hear of a new method for improving the number of consumers who respond to an ad. The employee will be driven by the need to meet the goals of the performance management plan, and not primarily by ethical considerations. After all, employees who don’t measure up, will not be considered for raises and promotions, may be the first selected when there is a layoff, and may find themselves “managed out” of the company. Ultimately, people may be faced with decisions that require choosing between ethical behavior and behavior that will go toward helping them stay employed (feed, house and clothe their family).And in most corporations, there is no incentive for ethical behavior.
  • The Global Collapse of Information Integrity

    1. 1. the global collapse ofinformation integritySanta Cruz Community Media LabMay 1, 2013Joel Postman© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    2. 2. 2012 Top Writer
    3. 3. There is an inverse relationship betweenthe value of information and the ease with whichit is created and distributed.There are forces at work driving a global declinein the value of information.© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    4. 4. the myth of participationonly 1% of peopleactually create;90% are passive.© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    5. 5. content swirl: we’ve made it too easy© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    6. 6. 2.7BLIKESPER DAY5B+1PER DAY575LIKESPERSECOND>80%OF PINS AREREPINS53%OF USERSNEVERUPDATEclicking, liking, sharing, & doing nothinghttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/brian-honigman/100-fascinating-social-me_b_2185281.htmlhttp://www.convinceandconvert.com/twitter/7-surprising-statistics-about-twitter-in-america/http://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2013/10002/world-internet-stats-websites-email-social-media-and-more© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    7. 7. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socializedterminal content velocity
    8. 8. declining trust in online information© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    9. 9. ap hacked: reports white house explosion© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    10. 10. minutes later, market plunges, recoversWithin three minutes, DowJones dropped 145 points(about 1%) andS&P 500 index also fellnearly 1pc briefly wiping out$136.5bn of the indexsvalue, according to Reuters.© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    11. 11. tmz reports lil wayne’s pending demise© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    12. 12. tmz & lil wayne aftermath is mixed© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    13. 13. commercial agenda clouds the waters© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    14. 14. “I thought of my post as a piece ofwriting, and they sent me a bottle ofvodka.”Louise Crawford, Absolut Blogger© 2013 Joel Postman & Socializedwill blog for booze
    15. 15. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socializedwho is selling what to whom?
    16. 16. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    17. 17. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    18. 18. chipping awayat trust andbrand equity© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    19. 19. World Health OrganizationCharacteristics of a Psychopath• Callous unconcern for the feelings of others• Reckless disregard for the safety of others• Incapacity to maintain enduring relationships• Deceitfulness; repeated lying and conning othersfor profit• Incapacity to experience guilt• Failure to conform to social norms with respect tolawful behaviors.© 2013 Joel Postman & Socializedwhat kind of person is the corporation?
    20. 20. root cause: performance management• 20 – 70 – 10 rule• Reward top performers• Retain “vital 70”• Manage out “bottom 10”• Measure performanceJack WelchChairman and CEO of General Electric 1981 to 2001© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    21. 21. writing is a declining commodity© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    22. 22. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    23. 23. © 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    24. 24. corporate editorial© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    25. 25. “writing” in a corporate environment• Still opportunities in corporate editorial• Social media influence has been mixed• Few “pure” writing jobs• Project management is valued• Metrics are increasingly important• Plenty of professional communicators stilldon’t get it, but that’s changing, too© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    26. 26. ever changing definition of journalism© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    27. 27. man on the street theater© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    28. 28. thank you! @jpostman 415-279-3444© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    29. 29. • Net income last quarter was $3.1 million, downfrom $42.1 million in the same period last year• Income from continuing operations is down to$3.1 million from $8.7 million a year earlier• Ad revenue declined 11.2 percent to $191.2million from $215.5 million• Print advertising at the Times, Boston Globe andInternational Herald Tribune declined 13.3percent• Digital advertising revenue declined 4 percentApril 25, 2013the new york times: continuing financial decline© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized
    30. 30. • Lower priced general interest consumer paidproduct• Lower priced products with access andadditional content in politics, technology,opinion, the arts and food.• Enhanced, higher price “all digital access” tier,with possible incentives like exclusive accessto Times events, and ability to giftsubscriptions and provide full family access.the new york times: paid content strategyApril 25, 2013© 2013 Joel Postman & Socialized

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