Final.the protesant reformation (1)

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Final.the protesant reformation (1)

  1. 1. TheProtestantReformation<br />By<br />Farshad Hashmatulla, AJ Bonelli, Joe Schymeinsky, David Cerda, and Alex Blay <br />
  2. 2. Martin LutherNovember 10,1483 – February 18,1546<br />German priest and professor of theology who initiated the Protestant Reformation<br />He became a monk in wittenburg after a lighting storm when he prayed to Saint Anne to spare his life<br />in return of sparing him he claimed he would become a priest/monk<br />He strongly disputed the Catholic Chruch’s claim that freedom from God's punishment of sin could be purchased with money<br />Also angry at tithe (taxing), simony, and nepotism<br />
  3. 3. Martin Luther and Lutheran Beliefs<br />He posted the Ninety-Five Theses in 1517<br />His refusal to recant all of his writings at the demand of the Pope in 1520 and the Holy Roman Emperor at the Diet of Worms in 1521 resulted in his excommunication and condemnation as an outlaw.<br />Peace of Augsburg in 1525, because he would not recant, the emperor gave all German princes to choose religion<br />Salvation by faith alone, not good works or following the Pope<br />Bible is only source of divine knowledge, it cannot come from a person such as the Pope<br />1st Translation of bible into vernacular German<br />1st in anything but Latin<br />Later in his life he was very anti Semitic<br />Peasants Revolt—peasants took his preaching wrong, and revolted against German royalty<br /> Luther told German princes to kill them out of anger that they interpreted his teachings wrong. Soon after, he felt terribly.<br />
  4. 4. John CalvinJuly 10, 1509 -May 27, 1564<br /><ul><li>Calvin was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation
  5. 5. He was the main figure in the development of the system of Christian Theology later referred to as Calvinism
  6. 6. He published the first edition of his seminal work Institutes of the Christian Religion in 1536, after fleeing to Basel from France because of a violent uprising against Protestants in France</li></li></ul><li>John Calvin (cont.)<br />Calvin believed that if authority was based on scripture alone in all matters of faith and practice, then many theological battles would quickly be settled.<br />Calvin was against the Fanatical Anabaptists who were not a precise group, but a scattered set of facts across Europe, many of them having differing views among themselves <br />
  7. 7. John Calvin (cont.)<br />He referred to them as “fanatics”, “Libertines”, and “enthusiasts.”<br />Calvin also wrote commentaries on most books of the bible<br />Calvin’s teachings provided the foundation for the branch of theology Calvinism<br />
  8. 8.  Predestination:<br />Predestination, in Calvinistic theology is the belief that all events have been willed by God<br />God has chosen who will be saved and who will not, once one is born<br /> Mankind cannot do anything to change God’s will<br />John Calvin interpreted biblical predestination to mean that God willed eternal damnation for some people and salvation for others<br />God may see the past, present, and future, so that God effectively knows the future, explaining God is able to predestine. <br /> <br />
  9. 9. The five solas<br /><ul><li>The Latin word sola means “alone” or “only”
  10. 10. Each solas is a fundamental belief of the Protestant Reformation
  11. 11. They summarize the Reformers’ basic beliefs in contrast to the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church</li></li></ul><li>Sola Scripture “By Scripture alone”<br /><ul><li>The teaching that the Bible is:
  12. 12. the only inspired word of God
  13. 13. the only source for Christian doctrine
  14. 14. and is accessible to all.
  15. 15. Sometimes called the formal principle of the Reformation</li></li></ul><li>Sola fide“by faith alone”<br />The teaching that reason can only be received through faith only<br />Sometimes called the material cause or principle of the Reformation because it was the central doctrinal issue for Martin Luther and the other reformers. <br />Luther called it the "doctrine by which the church stands or falls"<br />
  16. 16. Sola Gratia“By grace alone”<br /><ul><li>The teaching that salvation comes by divine grace
  17. 17. Not something worthy of a sinner
  18. 18. This means that salvation is an unearned gift from God for Jesus’ sake
  19. 19. Some believe it as a "de-earned" gift since unbelievers lived in such a way as forfeit any gift from God.</li></li></ul><li>Solus Christus or Solo Christo“Christ alone” or “through Christ alone”<br />The teaching that Christ is the only mediator between God and man<br />As well as, there is salvation through no other<br />Classical Lutheranism continues to honor the memory of the Virgin Mary and other ideal saints. <br />
  20. 20. Soli Deogloria“Glory to God alone”<br /> The teaching that all glory is to be due to God alone, since salvation is accomplished solely through His will and action<br />Christians are to be motivated and inspired by God's glory and not their own.<br />
  21. 21. Anabaptist Roots<br />Christians that regard the Bible as their only rule for faith and life. <br />Originated in the town of Zurich, Switzerland in 1517.<br />By the year of 1522, the reformation in this town really started to take shape.<br />Mainly because of their main leader Ulrich Zwingli.<br />
  22. 22. Beliefs<br />Do not acknowledge infant baptism.<br />True baptism requires a public confession of both sin and faith. <br />Wanted to reform and purify not only theology but also the actual lives of Christians. <br /> (political and social relationships.)<br />
  23. 23. Five Tenents of Anabaptists<br />Sola Scriptura—Insistence on biblical authority for certain practices in matters of church polity and worship. <br />Separation of Church and State—Advocated separation of church and state. <br />Freedom of Conscience—Believed that the ultimate remedy for heresy was excommunication. Deny that the state had a right to punish or execute anyone for religious beliefs or teachings. <br />Believers' Baptism—First to point out the lack of explicit biblical support for infant baptism. <br />Holiness of Life—No tolerance for those who claimed to be justified by faith while living unfaithful lives. Anabaptists pointed out that Scripture says, "Faith without works is dead" (Jas. 2:20).<br />
  24. 24. Puritan Roots<br />Started in the sixteenth century as a movement to reform the Church of England.<br /> Accepted the interpretations of John Calvin on the nature of man, free will and predestination, and other basic concepts.<br />
  25. 25. Puritans in the Colonies<br />Religion of first Colonies in America<br />Numbers rose from 17,800 in 1640 to 106,000 in 1700.<br />Jonathon Edwards- Pastor in early colonies who scared faith into people. <br />
  26. 26. Puritan Beliefs <br />God could forgive anything, but man could forgive only by seeing a change in behavior. <br />Actions spoke louder than words, so actions had to be constantly controlled.<br />God had already chosen who would be in heaven or hell. Those who were wealthy were obviously blessed by God and were in good standing with Him. (Predestination) <br />The New Testament was their model and their devotion so great that it permeated their entire society. <br />People of opposing theological views were asked to leave the community or to be converted.<br />
  27. 27. Henry VIII (June 28, 1491- January 28, 1547)<br /><ul><li>The King of England from 21 April 1509.
  28. 28. Had six wives:
  29. 29. Catherine of Argon (wife from 1509-1533 and was Divorced)
  30. 30. Anne Boleyn (wife from 1533-1536 and was executed)
  31. 31. Jane Seymour (wife from 1536-1537 and died)
  32. 32. Anne of Cleves (wife from 1540 Jan.-1540 July and was Divorced)
  33. 33. Kathryn Howard (wife from 1540-1542 and was executed)
  34. 34. Katherine Parr (wife from 1543-1547 and was widowed)
  35. 35. He is Known for separating from the Roman Catholic Church to form the Church of England</li></li></ul><li>Henry VIII (cont.)<br /><ul><li>The Dissolution of the monasteries and establishing himself as the supreme head of the Church of England where Henry’s struggles that led to the separation from the Roman Catholic Church.
  36. 36. Excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church by the pope in 1533.
  37. 37. This was the result of his divorce from Catherine of Argon.</li></li></ul><li>Henry VIII (cont.)<br /><ul><li>When Parliament passed the Act of Supremacy in 1534, it gave King Henry VIII the title of Supreme head of the Church of England.
  38. 38. Allowed by the Act of Supremacy, King Henry VIII disbanded monasteries, priories, convents, and friaries in England, Wales, and Ireland. This was the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
  39. 39. Seized all the Catholic Churches’ assets in England.
  40. 40. Separated from the Papal authority by the Act of Supremacy, the 1st Suppression Act (1536) and the 2nd Suppression act (1539).
  41. 41. This where the legal processes that allowed King Henry VIII to obtain the title of Supreme head of the Church of England and dissolve the monasteries.</li></li></ul><li>Thomas More<br />Sir Thomas More(Feb. 7 1478- 6 July 1535)<br />To Catholics he was Saint Thomas More<br />Became a saint in 1935<br />Very high reputation<br />Was a English Lawyer, Social philosopher, author, salesman, and humanist.<br />He was a councilor to Henry VIII of England<br />He published Utopia in 1516<br />This was his made up imagery paradise.<br />
  42. 42. Thomas More cont.<br />Opponent to the protestant reformation especially with Martin Luther and William Tyndale.<br />Saw the Reformation as heresy and a threat to the unity of society and the Church<br />Heard “Martin Luther’s call to destroy the Catholic Church as a call to war”<br />Stopped Lutheran writings from being imported into England<br />Arrested any one in possession of one.<br />Suppressed users of Tyndale's English translation of the New testament<br />
  43. 43. Thomas More cont.<br />He refused to accept the king as the Supreme head of the Church of England and Was against the separation of the Catholic Church and the Church of England.<br />He also refused to an oath required by the First Succession Act<br />This was because the act took away the power of the Pope and Henry's marriage to Catherine of Argon.<br />Because of this he was imprisoned in 1534, tried , convicted , and Beheaded in 1535<br />
  44. 44. Anabaptist Roots<br />Christians that regard the Bible as their only rule for faith and life. <br />Originated in the town of Zurich, Switzerland in 1517.<br />By the year of 1522, the reformation in this town really started to take shape.<br />Mainly because of their main leader Ulrich Zwingli.<br />
  45. 45. Beliefs<br />Do not acknowledge infant baptism.<br />True baptism requires a public confession of both sin and faith. <br />Wanted to reform and purify not only theology but also the actual lives of Christians. <br /> (political and social relationships.)<br />
  46. 46. Five Tenents of Anabaptists<br />Sola Scriptura—Insistence on biblical authority for certain practices in matters of church polity and worship. <br />Separation of Church and State— Advocated separation of church and state. <br />Freedom of Conscience—Believed that the ultimate remedy for heresy was excommunication. Deny that the state had a right to punish or execute anyone for religious beliefs or teachings. <br />Believers' Baptism—First to point out the lack of explicit biblical support for infant baptism. <br />Holiness of Life—No tolerance for those who claimed to be justified by faith while living unfaithful lives. Anabaptists pointed out that Scripture says, "Faith without works is dead" (Jas. 2:20).<br />
  47. 47. Puritan Roots<br />Started in the sixteenth century as a movement to reform the Church of England.<br /> Accepted the interpretations of John Calvin on the nature of man, free will and predestination, and other basic concepts.<br />
  48. 48. Puritans in the Colonies<br />Religion of first Colonies in America<br />Numbers rose from 17,800 in 1640 to 106,000 in 1700.<br />Jonathon Edwards- Pastor in early colonies who scared faith into people. <br />
  49. 49. Puritan Beliefs <br />God could forgive anything, but man could forgive only by seeing a change in behavior. <br />Actions spoke louder than words, so actions had to be constantly controlled.<br />God had already chosen who would be in heaven or hell. Those who were wealthy were obviously blessed by God and were in good standing with Him. (Predestination) <br />The New Testament was their model and their devotion so great that it permeated their entire society. <br />People of opposing theological views were asked to leave the community or to be converted.<br />
  50. 50. Vernacular Hymns <br />During the Reformation, reforms wanted the service to be in the vernacular.<br />Wanted the Hymns to be understood and sung by the people. <br />To get away from the plainchant harmony, which monks could only perform<br />Create metrical versions of the psalms<br />They where given a rhyme and rhythm and verse structure.<br />Easier to sing and understand<br />Martin Luther played a big role in development<br />With the introduction of printing these Hymns became available to ordinary congregants.<br />Gave ordinary people the ability to understand hymns<br />
  51. 51. Sources<br />http://tudorhistory.org/henry8/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_VIII_of_England<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissolution_of_the_Monasteries<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Head_of_the_Church_of_England<br />http://tudorhistory.org/wives/<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther<br /><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_More#Campaign_against_the_Reformation
  52. 52. http://www.music-for-church-choirs.com/hymns.html</li>

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