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Packaging ideas--nanopublications-in-the-humanities--Europeana--2015-04-21

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Packaging ideas--nanopublications-in-the-humanities--Europeana--2015-04-21

  1. 1. Packaging ideas Jodi Schneider ERCIM Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow, INRIA jschneider@pobox.com Europeana The Hague 2015-04-23
  2. 2. How do we share ideas… CC-BY: jinterwas https://www.flickr.com/photos/jinterwas/5286747234/
  3. 3. …in the age of the Web? CC-BY: Miguel Angel https://www.flickr.com/photos/migueleveryday/5914092322/
  4. 4. Package CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html
  5. 5. Description of contents CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html
  6. 6. Provider of contents CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html
  7. 7. Package CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html Description Provider
  8. 8. How to package ideas for the Web CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html "Package" for an idea • Description • Provider
  9. 9. How to package ideas for the Web CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html NANOPUBLICATION "Package" for an idea • Description Assertion of idea • Provider Attribution (author of idea)
  10. 10. http://www.nanopub.org/ ‘A nanopublication is the smallest unit of publishable information: an assertion about anything that can be uniquely identified and attibuted to its author. Individual nanopublications can be cited by others and monitored for their impact on the community.’
  11. 11. Who uses nanopublications? • Scientists – Pharmacology – Computer science – …
  12. 12. Lots of science done, 2009-now
  13. 13. Work on… • Creating & sharing nanopublications • Automating nanopublications • Distributed networks
  14. 14. Nanopublications in the humanities?
  15. 15. Nano-publications in the arts and humanities? Sally Chambers http://www.twitter.com/schambers3 http://www.slideshare.net/schambers3 #datasalon7 Ghent, Belgium, 25.11.11 http://www.slideshare.net/schambers3/nanopublications-in-the-arts-and-humanities
  16. 16. Much progress since 2011!
  17. 17. Philosophers http://emto-nanopub.referata.com/wiki/EMTO_Nanopub
  18. 18. Archaeologists http://cs.unibo.it/save-sd/2015/papers/html/golden-savesd2015.html
  19. 19. http://cs.unibo.it/save-sd/2015/papers/html/golden-savesd2015.html
  20. 20. What else could this be used for? CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html Description Attribution
  21. 21. Acknowledgements • Paul Groth • Sally Chambers. (Nov 2011) Nano-publications in the arts and humanities? Ghent #datasalon7 http://www.slideshare.net/schambers3/nanopublications-in-the-arts-and-humanities

Editor's Notes

  • How nanopublications could impact research in the humanities


    20 min, starting at 10 AM

    Dear all,

    On Thursday a good friend of mine, Jodi Schneider [1], is visiting us for some R&D discussions.

    She has volunteered to give a short, gentle introduction on one of her research topics, nanopublications.
    Nanopublications are rather trendy in R&D for 'hard' sciences now, but it could also impact how research is done in humanities, so closer to us. That day, you'll be able to say you had an early glimpse of it!

    We've decided to try this as an informal 'R&D coffee'. It will last 20 minutes and start at 10:00 in the big meeting room, if you're interested. BYO Coffee and please fill your name at
    http://doodle.com/qvfcudf2kx8624cf
    so that we can have an idea of who's coming.

    I won't lure people in by offering cake. But I'm not saying there won't be any cake, either ;-)

    Cheers,

    Antoine

    [1] http://jodischneider.com/jodi.html
  • CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html



    L0058536 Credit Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images
    ‘Blue Pills’ were found in many pharmacies and dispensing chemists throughout the 1800s and beyond. Used for a range of ailments as varied as constipation, tuberculosis and toothache, Blue Pills contain mercury and were potentially toxic, slowly poisoning the patient. The mercury content also hints at one of their other uses – as a medicine against the venereal disease, syphilis.

    Pills and treatments were often placed in earthenware dispensing pots like this one, which were covered with brown paper or vellum and tied with string. This example has the name of the pharmacist, “T C Lester”, and his address painted on to the side.

    maker: T C Lester

    Place made: Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
    made: 1880-1930
    Collection: Wellcome Images
    Library reference no.: Science Museum A640024

    Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html



    L0058536 Credit Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images
    ‘Blue Pills’ were found in many pharmacies and dispensing chemists throughout the 1800s and beyond. Used for a range of ailments as varied as constipation, tuberculosis and toothache, Blue Pills contain mercury and were potentially toxic, slowly poisoning the patient. The mercury content also hints at one of their other uses – as a medicine against the venereal disease, syphilis.

    Pills and treatments were often placed in earthenware dispensing pots like this one, which were covered with brown paper or vellum and tied with string. This example has the name of the pharmacist, “T C Lester”, and his address painted on to the side.

    maker: T C Lester

    Place made: Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
    made: 1880-1930
    Collection: Wellcome Images
    Library reference no.: Science Museum A640024

    Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • CC-BY: Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images http://wellcomeimages.org/indexplus/image/L0058536.html



    L0058536 Credit Science Museum, London, Wellcome Images
    ‘Blue Pills’ were found in many pharmacies and dispensing chemists throughout the 1800s and beyond. Used for a range of ailments as varied as constipation, tuberculosis and toothache, Blue Pills contain mercury and were potentially toxic, slowly poisoning the patient. The mercury content also hints at one of their other uses – as a medicine against the venereal disease, syphilis.

    Pills and treatments were often placed in earthenware dispensing pots like this one, which were covered with brown paper or vellum and tied with string. This example has the name of the pharmacist, “T C Lester”, and his address painted on to the side.

    maker: T C Lester

    Place made: Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
    made: 1880-1930
    Collection: Wellcome Images
    Library reference no.: Science Museum A640024

    Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • http://www.openphacts.org/about-open-phacts/what-does-open-phacts-do
  • http://www.slideshare.net/schambers3/nanopublications-in-the-arts-and-humanities
  • ×