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5 steps to answer behavioral interview questions

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5 steps to answer behavioral interview questions

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5 steps to answer behavioral interview questions

  1. 1. Free ebook 5 steps to answer behavioral interview questions 2017
  2. 2. Job interview checklist: • behavioral interview • situational interview • types of interview questions • interview thank you letters • Mistakes in job interview • Things to do after job interview
  3. 3. Useful free ebooks for your job interview: • http://jobinterview247.com/free-ebook-145-interview-questions-and-answers • http://jobinterview247.com/free-ebook-top-22-secrets-to-win-every-job-interviews
  4. 4. 1. Prepare for the STAR model. This is a common behavioral interview format. "Tell us about a Situation or Task that you encountered in a past position. Describe the Action you took, and explain the Result." An example of this might be, "Tell us about a time where you were confronted by an angry customer. What did you do, and what was the result?" The panel may then ask further, more in-depth questions about the details of the situation that you describe. • Listen carefully to the question the interviewer asks. Be sure that you are giving him or her an example that will demonstrate the skills he/she is looking for. • Clarify what is being asked by rephrasing the question back to the interviewer. Demonstrate that you understand the question. This way, the interviewer can put you back on the right track if you didn't fully understand what the question was asking.
  5. 5. 2. Describe the situation. The interviewers will usually prompt you to think of a specific type of situation: e.g. a time when you had to resolve a conflict between members of your team. Pick a situation that paints you in a positive light. Provide an example of a time when you previously demonstrated a certain competency or behavior, preferably in a work situation: for example, your problem-solving ability. • You don't need to pick a "success," necessarily. If you can explain how you learned from failure, then you may impress employers with your honesty. • Try to think of relevant situations ahead of time. Make a short list of challenges that you've overcome in past jobs that might also be applicable to this new job. • The situation doesn't need to be something that occurred at a job. If you don't have much relevant work experience, try to draw from situations that occurred while you were at college or school, playing on a sports team, volunteering, or performing any other extracurricular activities.
  6. 6. 3. Talk about a task. This task might be a project, a repeating role, or a special mission. The task may be something that you encountered on a regular basis at a past job, or it may be the account of a request that took you out of your comfort zone. Think back to a project that challenged you to grow.
  7. 7. 4. Outline the action that you took. Tell the interviewers about the steps that you took to resolve the situation. Explain your thought process and how you knew what to do. Make sure to focus on what you as an individual did. If you refer to "we," then it will not be clear what your specific contribution was. Do not inflate your own importance, but be sure to own your actions.If you are describing a customer situation, then explain how you handled that customer. If you are answering a question about a team conflict, then explain what you said to each member of the team in question.
  8. 8. 5. Explain the result. Clearly detail the outcome of your actions, including what happened and what you learned from the situation. It is very important to frame the example as a learning experience.

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