Life 2.0: A Vision for Education in the 21st Century

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The world our students are about to enter is nothing like it was just ten years ago, and all evidence suggests that the pace of change is continuing to accelerate. Yet too often, when we as educators contemplate the role of technology in education, we focus on the "technology" more than the "education" because our vision of the future is blurred by perceptions driven by politics, marketing, and the media. As a consequence, there has been a disturbing trend to focus on tools as a solution to the problems facing education, rather than literacies that will empower our kids to thrive in their 21st century world. Through this session, attendees will explore five key areas that define what Life 2.0 will be about, will discuss their implications for education, will explore literacies that the 21st century student will need to survive in that world, and will discover ideas for utilizing that knowledge as a framework for change in the 21st century learning environment.

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  • Hyper connected: What happens when kids get to school? They turn off. When home, they see mom and dad using computers, everyone has cell phone, everyones connected. Bit not at school. And we wonder why they don't think school is relevant.
  • Hyper connected: What happens when kids get to school? They turn off. When home, they see mom and dad using computers, everyone has cell phone, everyones connected. Bit not at school. And we wonder why they don't think school is relevant.
  • Absolutely agree with you that pedagogy is critical to realizing the effectiveness of a technology-rich environment. That said, you seem to be suggesting here that similar effectiveness to a 1:1 could be achieved in a 1:2 or 1:4, through corralling computer use into special projects or specific time slots, in essence containing the capabilities in an effort to maintain the status quo. This hardly creates the participatory learning environment that can be achieved with 1:1 (used effectively, of course.)
    If we wish to realize real change in the learning environment, we must let go of the notion that the teacher is at the center of learning and move towards a model where the students participate in the learning process. Students must be empowered to gather, assemble, learn, create, and yes, teach and support each other in the same fashion as they will when they enter the real world - with their own computer. They must have immediate access to current information from multiple sources, know how to vet that information for accuracy and bias, and learn how to use it properly and effectively to produce new ideas, and make effective arguments. They need to learn not only to use real world tools, but how to use them efficiently and effectively. This simply won't happen in one visit a week, or an hour a day, or one big project per school year. It needs to be continuous, active, and engaged.
    If we continue to look for ways to use technology by adding it on to the pedagogy we think "works", than what we are really saying is, "lets see how this fits in with what I'm already doing" rather than "what changes do I need to make to meet the needs/demands of the 21st century student and prepare them to enter the world they are about to join." Much harder to justify anything less than every student having their own device with that approach.
  • Absolutely agree with you that pedagogy is critical to realizing the effectiveness of a technology-rich environment. That said, you seem to be suggesting here that similar effectiveness to a 1:1 could be achieved in a 1:2 or 1:4, through corralling computer use into special projects or specific time slots, in essence containing the capabilities in an effort to maintain the status quo. This hardly creates the participatory learning environment that can be achieved with 1:1 (used effectively, of course.)
    If we wish to realize real change in the learning environment, we must let go of the notion that the teacher is at the center of learning and move towards a model where the students participate in the learning process. Students must be empowered to gather, assemble, learn, create, and yes, teach and support each other in the same fashion as they will when they enter the real world - with their own computer. They must have immediate access to current information from multiple sources, know how to vet that information for accuracy and bias, and learn how to use it properly and effectively to produce new ideas, and make effective arguments. They need to learn not only to use real world tools, but how to use them efficiently and effectively. This simply won't happen in one visit a week, or an hour a day, or one big project per school year. It needs to be continuous, active, and engaged.
    If we continue to look for ways to use technology by adding it on to the pedagogy we think "works", than what we are really saying is, "lets see how this fits in with what I'm already doing" rather than "what changes do I need to make to meet the needs/demands of the 21st century student and prepare them to enter the world they are about to join." Much harder to justify anything less than every student having their own device with that approach.
  • Life 2.0: A Vision for Education in the 21st Century

    1. 1. Life 2.0:A Vision for Education in the 21st Century
    2. 2. Intelligence Social Ineptitude Obsession Dweeb Nerd Geek Dork
    3. 3. What does it mean to be well educated in the 21st Century? Jakes, 2009
    4. 4. Life 2.0
    5. 5. Information Abundance:
    6. 6. 70exabytes
    7. 7. 70 billion gigabytes
    8. 8. 518,000 X
    9. 9. 12,000 gigabytes
    10. 10. 350 feet tall
    11. 11. 1-100 terabytes=
    12. 12. 70exabytes
    13. 13. 770exabytes in 2009
    14. 14. Life 2.0 Information Abundance
    15. 15. Free*:
    16. 16. Freedom
    17. 17. Life 2.0 Information Abundance Free*
    18. 18. Managing Choice:
    19. 19. Life 2.0 Information Abundance Free* Managing Choice
    20. 20. Hyper- Connected:
    21. 21. Life 2.0 Information Abundance Free* Managing Choice Hyper- Connected
    22. 22. Embracing Failure:
    23. 23. Life 2.0 Information Abundance Free* Managing Choice Hyper- Connected Embracing Failure
    24. 24. ● Every student needs a device – Inexpensive – Reliable – Durable – Easy to use – Minimal support – Always on connectivity ● Access to a diverse range of resources and tools ● Place to communicate, create, collaborate
    25. 25. Netbooks
    26. 26. Open Technologies
    27. 27. Firefox 3 with the Flash10 plugin Mozilla Thunderbird (Email, Calendaring) Skype Adobe Reader Instant Messaging for all services, including GTalk, AOL, MSN, Jabber, etc. (Pidgin) OpenOffice (Sun's supported commercial version of OpenOffice) Google Earth Labyrinth (Mind Mapping) Tuxpaint (like KidPix, only better) TuxTyping (typing tutor/game) Stellarium (astronomy software) Celestia (astronomy software) TuxMath (math drilling game) Mebook (eBook Reader) F-Spot (Photo manager) GIMP (like Photoshop) Dia (Diagramming) Audacity audio recording/editing suite MIT Scratch (Logo-style programming on steroids) iTalc (classroom management/remote monitoring/control) VNC for remote technical support A number of other software programs, including: - Longman Dictionary - Interactive periodic table - Letter Game (scrambled words) - Hangman game - Fraction tutorial - Geometry tool - Function Plotter - Media Player - Music Manager - Photo Manager Internet Explorer Outlook Express Adobe Reader MSN Instant Messanger (Microsoft only) Windows Live Garbage A number of other software programs, including: - Paint - DVD Player (if you hook up an external DVD drive) - Media Player - File Manager - Webcam - Calculator - Text editor Games: - Solitaire - Minesweeper Lots and Lots of Crapware
    28. 28. - Video Manager - File Manager - Webcam - Calculator - Screen Capture Games: - GBrainy - Frozen Bubble - Multiplication Puzzle - GWeled - Sudoku, - Potato Guy - LinCity - LMarbles - SuperTux
    29. 29. User System Changes System and Programs User Home Folder UnionFSRapid Recovery X
    30. 30. Changing the Game ● Social – Changes relationships between producers and consumers – Changes the way we view software – Culture of open collaboration – Unintended consequences ● Technical – Enables new technology use – Improved functionality through flexibility – Greater reliability creates more time for learning opportunities
    31. 31. Changing the Game ● Educational – Enables/boosts innovation – Facilitates pedagogic diversity and choice – Offers diversity in both context and provision of learning opportunities – Frees learning from grade level, age, classification – Student-centered, participatory learning
    32. 32. Learning Landscape of the Future
    33. 33. Learning Landscape of the Future ● Students and teachers using technology to create and share content in a collaborative way ● Refocus the emphasis of technology on teaching and learning ● Classroom-driven integration of content and learning resources ● New ways of learning – Literacy of information navigation – Experiential, project-based learning – Construction/creation through a diverse range of available resources and tools
    34. 34. Learning Landscape of the Future
    35. 35. "The conversation about technology in schools is trapped in the wrong subject. The talk is all about "does the technology work" as a fix for the old. It ought to be about developing and choosing between visions of how this immensely powerful technology can support the invention of powerful new forms of learning to serve levels of expectation higher than anything imagined in the past.” ~ Seymour Papert
    36. 36. I never teach my pupils; I only attempt to provide conditions in which they can learn. Albert Einstein
    37. 37. Thanks! Twitter: jnetman1 http://community.saugususd.org/jklein
    38. 38. Credits ● Open sign: CC BY:NC:ND http://www.flickr.com/photos/martyn/186363962 ● Small world: CC BY:NC http://www.flickr.com/photos/santheo/1874841 CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/2222523978 ● OLPC: CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/olpc/2606362847 ● Penguins in car: CC BY:NC:ND http://flickr.com/photos/mikz/348849931 ● World hug: CC BY:NC http://www.flickr.com/photos/cayusa/2452896467 ● Hyper Connected: C Hugh Mcleod http://www.gapingvoid.com/Moveable_Type/archives/004549.html ● Industrial school: CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/duchamp/117943548 ● Chalkboard: CC BY:NC:ND http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidereal/294267127 ● Network: CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/schoschie/217848140 ● World share: CC BY:NC http://www.flickr.com/photos/cayusa/2051756510 ● Cell Phones: CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/43078695@N00/118885175 ● Laptop Cat: CC BY NC SA http://www.flickr.com/photos/65128729@N00/2179324215 ● Netbook Girl: CC BY http://www.flickr.com/photos/11907648@N06/3445017595

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