Sombuntham, S. and Khlaisang, J. (2013). Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practice for OpenOnline Courseware’s Servi...
Figure 1: Screenshot of TCU OOC(http://www.thaicyberu.go.th)Figure 2: Screenshot of TCU OOC(Example of user’ page after lo...
Table 2: Total Times and Number of SessionsAccessing Course During Year 2012 (the top 10courses) (Continued)Total Time and...
users by their educational levels are reported in table 5and figure 6.Table 5: Number of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsCl...
In accordance to the mentioned data, it can beconcluded that for further design and development thecontent for each course...
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Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practice for Open Online Courseware’s Services

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Sombuntham, S. and Khlaisang, J. (2013). Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practice for Open Online Courseware’s Services. The Asia Regional OpenCourseWare and Open Education Conference 2012, organized by Japan Opencourseware Consortium and Office of the Higher Education Commission, Bangkok, Thailand, January 21-22, 2013.

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Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practice for Open Online Courseware’s Services

  1. 1. Sombuntham, S. and Khlaisang, J. (2013). Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practice for OpenOnline Courseware’s Services. The Asia Regional OpenCourseWare and Open Education Conference 2012,organized by Japan Opencourseware Consortium and Office of the Higher Education Commission, Bangkok,Thailand, January 21-22, 2013.Thailand Cyber University and the Best Practicefor Open Online Courseware’s ServicesSupannee Sombuntham1and Jintavee Khlaisang, Ed.D. 21Assistant Professor and Advisor to the TCU ProjectThailand Cyber University Project, Bangkok, Thailand, ssupanne@gmail.com2Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Technology and Communications,Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, jintavee.m@chula.ac.thABSTRACTThailand Cyber University (TCU) Project under theOffice of the Higher Education Commission (OHEC),Ministry of Education has provided central e-Learninginfrastructure for sharing of content and educationalresources. This infrastructure includes servers to hostthe sharable contents, as well as necessary hardwareand software. TCU has also established central webportal at http://www.thaicyberu.go.th housing manyuseful resources, such as TCU-LMS (open source andfree in-house built Learning Management System).TCU provides the members with continuous help andsupport and over 700 sharable Open OnlineCourseware (OOC) at the national standards. 2,877participants have confirmed that they are satisfied toextremely satisfy by the OOC.Keywords : The Office of Higher EducationCommission : OHEC , Thailand Cyber UniversityProject : TCU , Open Online Courseware : OOC1) INTRODUCTION:In accordance to the education policy of the secondThailand National ICT Policy Framework and IT 2010(2002-2016), Thailand Cyber University (TCU)founded in 2005, under the Office of the HigherEducation Commission (OHEC), Ministry ofEducation, has initiated various projects in order toenhance education quality by providing e-Learning toThai citizens at all levels, and to increase educationalopportunities as to support the lifelong learning.Therefore, it can be seen that the initiated projects inrelated to the enhancement of open education can beaddressed as follows: (1) TCU as a center for e-Learning infrastructure to share content andeducational resources, (2) TCU as a center of webportal (http://www.thaicyberu.go.th) housing manyuseful resources, (3) TCU as a LMS provider calledTCU-LMS, an open source and free in-house builtLearning Management System, (4) TCU as a learningresource sharing center by developing the e-library, e-learning resource, and e-community, and (5) TCU as asupporter for the production of the sharable OpenOnline Courseware (OOC) disseminating via UniNet.Thus for, this paper will focus particularly on the lastproject, the sharable Open Online Courseware (OOC)which currently contain upto700 courses with morethan 50,000 users have enrolled in one or morecourses, and more than 600,000 users have visitedthe website since the starting of the project in 2005(Thammetar, 2012). This paper aims at presenting:(1) the overview of OOC (2) the user analysis inaccordance with the users’ satisfaction collectedfrom 2011 to 2012, and (3) the summary of OOCbased upon the mentioned analysis as for thechallenge and which should not be overlooked.2) TCU OOC : THE OVERVIEWTCU OOC can be accessed through TCU mainpage at http://www.thaicyberu.go.th. After loggingin, learners can choose their self-paced learningcourses of their interests, and also can learn fromanywhere at any time of their convenience. Thescreen shot of the TCU main page is presented infigure 1, while figure 2 shows example of user’page after logging in. Since the OOC wasdeveloped based on the concept of self-learningcourses, users can enroll in as many courses as theydesire to learn, also they have the authority towithdraw themselves from the courses. Figure 3shows the screen shot of one of the courses fromTCU OOC. After entering into the course, therewill be a navigation bar presenting the courseoutlines on the left of the screen, while the contentis presented on the right. Currently, there are 602courses available on the OOC system, while thereare almost 100 courses which are in the developingprocess. Out of 602 courses, there are cooperationfrom 39 organizations. The majority of the courses(126 courses) was developed by KasetsartUniversity, followed by Suan Dusit RajabhatUniversity (110 courses), and ChulalongkornUniversity (68 courses) respectively. Out of 39collaborated organizations, most of them are publicand private universities, while some of them werecooperation among Thai university and theuniversity in Japan which offer opportunity andenhance quality of education at international level.Thus for, the details of the top 10 organizationsdeveloping the highest numbers of self-pacedlearning courses can be seen in table 1.
  2. 2. Figure 1: Screenshot of TCU OOC(http://www.thaicyberu.go.th)Figure 2: Screenshot of TCU OOC(Example of user’ page after log in)Figure 3: Screenshot of TCU OOC(Example of the course after log in)Table 1 : Total of Self-paced Learning CoursesClassify by Organizations (the top 10 organizationsdeveloping the highest numbers of OOC)Total of Self-Paced Learning CoursesOrganizationsNo. ofCourses%Kasetsart University 126 20.93Suan Dusit Rajabhat University 110 18.27Chulalongkorn University 68 11.30Naresuan University 57 9.47Group of Universities supported byOHEC49 8.14King Mongkut’s Institute ofTechnology Ladkrabang39 6.48The University of the Thai Chamberof Commerce25 4.15Silpakorn University 12 1.99The Stock Exchange of Thailand 12 1.99Thailand Cyber University 11 1.83Microsoft (Thailand) Limited 11 1.83Mahasarakham University 10 1.66When considering total times and number ofsessions accessing courses during year 2012, it wasfound that the top ten courses are listed in table 2.The data indicated that the course with the mosttotal time access was TCU-TMM101 (Tell MeMore) (215,463 minutes) provided by ThailandCyber University, followed by Learning Innovationcourse provided by Thepsatri Rajabhat University(119,884 minutes), and Chemistry course providedby Prince of Songkla University (95,757 minutes)correspondingly. When considering the timelearners spent the most in each session, it was foundthat Chemistry and Java programming were the twocourses learners spent most time in each session. Itcan be seen that learners spent average time of30.91 and 10.07 minutes for Chemistry and Javaprogramming courses, respectively.Table 2: Total Times and Number of SessionsAccessing Course During Year 2012 (The top 10courses)Total Time and No. of Sessions Accessing Courses(Top 10) Year 2012Total time(minutes)No ofsessionsAveragetimeCoursenameOrganization215,463 46,929 4.59 Tell Me MoreThailand CyberUniversity119,884 38,436 3.12LearningInnovationThepsatri RajabhatUniversity
  3. 3. Table 2: Total Times and Number of SessionsAccessing Course During Year 2012 (the top 10courses) (Continued)Total Time and No. of Sessions Accessing Courses(Top 10) Year 2012Total time(minutes)No ofsessionsAveragetimeCoursenameorganization95,757 3,098 30.91 ChemistryPrince of SongklaUniversity91,178 9,058 10.07JavaProgrammingChulalongkornUniversity70,893 39,712 1.79CurriculumDevelopmentThepsatri RajabhatUniversity50,535 12,649 4.00Computer inBusinessChulalongkornUniversity49,470 11,229 4.41EducationalTechnologySuan DusitRajabhat University43,230 9,661 4.47Facebook forinstructionThailand CyberUniversity42,749 7,786 5.49Methods ofTeachingSuan DusitRajabhat University42,729 17,161 2.49LearningManagementThepsatri RajabhatUniversity3) TCU OOC: USER ANALYSISAccording to the study reported by Thammetar (2012),there was found that 2,877 participants during 2011-2012 have confirmed that they are satisfied toextremely satisfy by the OOC. In accordance to theresearch result, demographics and backgroundinformation consistent with the users’ satisfaction rateswere collected from the year 2005 to 2012 including:age, occupation, study level, and access time in orderto gather the in depth information related to the users’traits. Table 3 and figure 4 present the user by gender.Of the 266,987 users (collected since 2005), themajority of the users had age average of 27-39(38.60%), followed by the users had age average of 20-26 (33.42%).The occupations of the users are presented in table 4and figure 5. Of the total users, majority of them(37.03%) were students, followed by governmentofficer/staff (21.04%), and employee (11.54%)respectively. Details are reported as follows.Table 3: Number of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Age GroupNumber of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Age GroupAge Group Total %0-19 19,535 7.3220-26 89,229 33.4227-39 103,044 38.6040-46 23,113 8.6647-57 20.910 7.83>= 58 11,156 4.18Grand Total 266,987Figure 4: Numbers of Self-Paced CourseRegistrations Classified by Users’ Age GroupTable 4: Number of Self-Paced CourseRegistrations Classified by Users’ OccupationNumber of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ OccupationOccupation Total %Student 98,870 37.03GovernmentOfficer/Staff56.164 21.04Employee 30,808 11.54Self-Employ 8,852 3.32Unemployed 5,956 2.23State EnterpriseEmployee5,008 1.88N/A 61,329 22.97Grand Total 266,987Figure 5: Numbers of Self-Paced CourseRegistrations Classified by Users’ OccupationThe education levels of the users are presented inTable 5 and figure 6. Of the total users,approximately one-third of them (32.74%) holdbachelor’s degree, while 11.50% have earnedsecondary level, and 8.95% have earned masterdegree level correspondingly. The details regarding
  4. 4. users by their educational levels are reported in table 5and figure 6.Table 5: Number of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Education LevelNumber of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Education LevelOccupation Total %Bachelor’s Degree 87,400 32.74Secondary Level 30,692 11.50Master’s Degree 23,895 8.95Diploma 8,072 3.02Vocational 6,861 2.57Primary Level 5,795 2.17Graduate Diploma 2,146 0.80Doctoral Degree 1,731 0.65Higher GraduateDiploma1,397 0.52N/A 98,998 37.08Grand Total 266,987Figure 6: Numbers of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Education LevelThe access time data of the users are presented in table6 and figure 7. Of the total users, more than half(55.38%) of the users accessed more than 1 minute butless than 1 hour. Concerning the other half of the users,34.07% accessed more than 1 hour but less than 10hours, while 8.57% accessed more than 10 hours. Thedetails regarding users by their access time are reportedin table 6 and figure 7.Table 6: Number of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Access TimeNumber of Self-Paced Course RegistrationsClassified by Users’ Access TimeAccess Time Total %Accessed less than 1 minute 1,230 1.99Accessed more than 1 minute butless than 1 hour34,241 55.38Accessed more than 1 hour butless than 10 hours21,064 34,07Accessed more than 10 hours 5,296 8.57Grand Total 61,831Figure 7: Numbers of Self-Paced CourseRegistrations Classified by Users’ Access Time4) TCU OOC: SUMMARYAs regards to the top 10 courses, the total times,and number of sessions accessing course during theyear 2005 until now, data were presented that thecourses in related to English subject, teaching andlearning subject, and science and technologysubject were gained in popularity. Whenconsidering the time accessing per session, theaverage was 7 minutes, while the longest period forusers to study in each session was 30 minutes.When considering the user demographic data, itwas found that a majority of users were in the agerange of 27-39 and 20-26 years old (38.60% and33.42% respectively). Most of the users werestudents and government officers/staffs (37.03%and 21.04% respectively). Data were varied interms of users’ educational levels which could becategorized into 9 groups (table 5), though most ofthem (32.74%) have earned a bachelor’s degree.More than half of the users (55.38%) accessed morethan 1 minute but less than 1 hour.In addition, the TCU voting report presents thesatisfaction scores during 2006-2011. It can be seenthat the overall of voting report during the last 6years was higher than 70%. The highest vote was inyear 2006 (100%), followed by 2011 (77.7%), and2010 (72.6%). The details are presented in figure 8.Figure 8: TCU Voting Report
  5. 5. In accordance to the mentioned data, it can beconcluded that for further design and development thecontent for each course, the three mentioned subjectareas may be set as priority. When considering theportion of the content in each course, it should becontained no longer than 30-60 minutes for learningand should be considered to divide it into as many sub-topics as possible. For each sub topic, it should containthe content that may take 5-7 minutes for learning. Thiswas consistent with the research findings by Khlaisang(2012) and Khlaisang (2010) mentioned that in order togain learners’ attractiveness and instructionaleffectiveness, content should be concise, updated, andchunked materials to help organize contents inappropriate categories. In terms of the contentreliability, the OOC has addressed name and affiliationof the owners of the contents which are vital and wouldbe benefit of others for further references. Whenconsidering the content quality, it was found that theOOC has presented fact with no bias, along with therecognition of resource used in the content. As far asfor the interface design and usability testing of OOC, itwas also in line with the research findings where thenavigation, the accessibility, and the design quality areappropriate, consistency, leading to the instructionaleffectiveness and attractiveness in order to makelearners worth learning. As for the challenge of OOCto enter ASEAN learning community in 2015, themodification of some courseware existing in OOC thatapplicable for ASEAN context should be considered.Some revision, such as, adding English caption, orproviding dual languages may be taken intoconsideration to make OOC ready and available forASEAN learning community in 2015.5) REFERENCESKhlaisang, J. (2012). Analysis of the Cultural FactorsAffecting the Proper Design of Website andElectronic Courseware for e-Learning inASEAN. Proceedings of The 26th AnnualConference of Asian Association of OpenUniversities (AAOU2012), organized by the OpenUniversity of Japan and Association of OpenUniversities, Chiba, Japan, October 16-18, 2012.Khlaisang, J. (2012). Proper Design of Website andElectronic Courseware for e-Learning inASEAN: Cultural framework for Consideration.Proceedings of The National e-LearningConference (NEC 2012): Integrating ASEANOnline Learning: Policy and Process, organized byThailand Cyber University, Office of HigherEducation Commission, August 16-18, 2012.Khlaisang, J. (2011). E-Learning Website andCourseware: Current State and Future Trends.Proceedings of The National e-LearningConference: Open Learning - Open the World(NEC 2011), organized by Thailand CyberUniversity, Office of Higher EducationCommission, August 9-10, 2011: pp. 49-58.Khlaisang, J. (2010). Proposed ModelsAppropriate Website and Courseware for E-Learning in Higher Education: Research BasedDesign Models. Proceedings of the E-Learning2010: World Conference on E-Learning inCorporate, Government, Healthcare, & HigherEducation, organized by the Association for theAdvancement of Computing in Education,Orlando, Florida, U.S.A. October 18-22, 2010.Pp. 1520-1529.Sombuntham, S and Pinder, S. (2008). UE-learning - the fusion of u-Learning and e-Learning for sanook and serendipity. E-Journal of ICT for Learning.1(1), ThailandCyber University, Office of Higher EducationCommission.Sombuntham, S. (2008). Establishing CyberUniversity and Reform of Higher Education:Thailand Cyber University Project. Asia-Pacific Collaborative Education Journal VolumeVI, Novermber 2008 .Sombuntham, S. and Theeraroungchaisri. (2006).Thailand Cyber University: The StrategicMove to Higher Education Reform. APRUDLI, Bangkok, Thailand. 155-162.Thammetar, T. (2012). Thai Open OnlineCourseware. In T. Amiel & B. Wilson (Eds.),Proceedings of World Conference onEducational Multimedia, Hypermedia andTelecommunications 2012 (pp. 272-275).Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

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