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Years 8-10
The Language of
Persuasion: become
an expert (Series 2)
www.englishworks.com.au
Language Analysis pathway program
Series 2: Language of Persuasion:
Become an expert (978-0-9924942-0-9)
This workbook equ...
Chapter 1: a practical approach
Step 1: What are the author’s
views?
Step 2: What is the author’s tone
and style?
Step ...
Chapter 1: a practical approach
Step 4: Which words best reveal the
author’s attitude? Which words have
extra meanings? W...
Step 1: What is the author’s view?
Perspectives, spin and bias.
Learn the “main contention” words (p. 80).
These words an...
Step 2: The author’s
tone and style
An author’s tone is a clue to how they
seek to influence us. (pp 10-11)
Sprinkle ton...
Step 3: The author’s evidence
TRUST: If we are to adopt an author’s opinion,
we must be able to trust them. pp. 6-7, p. 28...
Step 4: What words does the author
use?
Type of language or words with
connotations: Many words have connotations or
a mea...
Step 5: On the attack
Authors improve their own argument by
criticising others. They may:
make harmful remarks or to set ...
Step 6: appealing to your
thoughts and feelings
Step 6: appeals and impact
Authors appeal to our emotions to:
encourage us to take action;
forge a common bond and direc...
See “appeals” table: values
(TheLanguageofPersuasion,Appeals,Exercise14,p.21.)
Learning the lingo
It is important to learn a
range of analytical vocabulary
so that you can write with
confidence.
Lear...
The “lingo” cont’d
Learn the main contention words on p. 80
Mr Trippler condones the use of violence
displayed among AFL ...
Some exercises
Exercise 12, p. 18
Hoon menace
While the hoons ( ) skid around the
corners undetected at 100 kmh in
residen...
Your Say:
Exercise 12, p. 18
“Hoon menace” by Mr Johnny Familyman
“Hoons”: 2. colloquial language
“Caught red-handed”: 4...
Write a paragraph analysing Mr
Familyman’s word choices:
(See suggested responses/online support)
Mr Familyman sarcastical...
(TheLanguageofPersuasion,Appeals,Exercise15,p.22.)
Exercise 15
Link to author’s
views and tone
Main contention: Mr Simon
advocates smacking as a useful
disciplinary tool.
Purpose: see...
A range of appeals
Exercise 15: At your discretion
(parentswatch.com.au) p. 22
 Appeal: fear. The author scares parents b...
Chapter 2 Choose a current issue.
Collect a sample of articles
from the newspaper and
from an online source.
Complete t...
Chapter 2
Study the features of a range of
persuasive texts:
Editorials and opinion articles
Letters, blogs and Your Say...
Table of comparisons
Student’s typical response
(Year 9), p. 13
Better Essays and Persuasive Techniques: pp. 43-70.
See “Flash of frustration”,...
Improvements:
“Flash of frustration”, p. 13
Tracey uses a series of sentence models and
metalanguage to improve analytica...
Year 9: outcomes, p. 13.
TheauthorjuxtaposesthecourteousdrivinghabitsofEuropeantruckdriverswiththeinconsideratehabitsofAu...
Year 10: outcomes, p. 63
Students will write a cohesive paragraph:
A model paragraph p. 63.
(Viewpoint) Sam Trimbone giv...
Student’s example, p. 22
Chief executive officer, Mr Jason Simon uses
an authoritative tone throughout his
argument. Mr S...
Suggested improvements
The paragraph consists of a list of
techniques, with a general or vague
connection to the author’s...
Outcomes: rewrite the paragraph
 Chief executive officer, Mr Jason Simon uses an authoritative tone to
advocate smacking ...
Chapter 3: write an essay
Essay plans
Write your essay
(see pp 73-76)
based on a range
of views relating
to:
Should we ...
Ready for the next step
You are now ready to work through
The Language of Persuasion: an essay
writing guide (2015)
This...
Resources include:
Suggested responses
E-books with exercises
(downloadable and
writable)
An e-licence (and class
sets)
Be...
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The language of persuasion become an expert

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The Language of persuasion: become an expert by learning the lingo and sharpening your thinking skills.
Also, make sure you second-guess the author!

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The language of persuasion become an expert

  1. 1. Years 8-10 The Language of Persuasion: become an expert (Series 2) www.englishworks.com.au
  2. 2. Language Analysis pathway program Series 2: Language of Persuasion: Become an expert (978-0-9924942-0-9) This workbook equips Middle Year students with skills to analyse more insightfully an author’s opinion and their persuasive tactics. In-depth discussion and targeted extension activities focus on: •the author’s views and credentials, their credibility and degree of bias; •the author’s evidence and reasoning tactics; and •the author’s choice of words and variations in tone and style. Chapter 2 introduces students to a range of media texts and encourages them to identify, and compare, their most important features. Chapter 3 provides an essay plan and paragraph maps to help students structure their essays.
  3. 3. Chapter 1: a practical approach Step 1: What are the author’s views? Step 2: What is the author’s tone and style? Step 3: What evidence does the author rely on? the difference between “hard” and “soft” evidence and its purpose.
  4. 4. Chapter 1: a practical approach Step 4: Which words best reveal the author’s attitude? Which words have extra meanings? What do they imply? How do they support the author’s views? Step 5: On the attack. How does the author criticise opponents and justify their views? Step 6: What appeals does the author make and what is their purpose?
  5. 5. Step 1: What is the author’s view? Perspectives, spin and bias. Learn the “main contention” words (p. 80). These words and phrases help you accurately explain the author’s views. The Language of Persuasion: pp. 3 – 5; p. 76.
  6. 6. Step 2: The author’s tone and style An author’s tone is a clue to how they seek to influence us. (pp 10-11) Sprinkle tone words throughout: (tone words can be either adjectives or adverbs) (p. 11) Identify whether the author’s style is formal or informal. (p. 12-14). This is a clue to the type of relationship the author sets up with the audience. The Language of Persuasion: pp. 9-14, 74-74.
  7. 7. Step 3: The author’s evidence TRUST: If we are to adopt an author’s opinion, we must be able to trust them. pp. 6-7, p. 28 Are they fair and reasonable? What is the author’s background? Which organisation do they represent? Is there any evidence of bias? Are they fair and reasonable? What evidence do they use? Authors use either facts and figures or “people” stories or a combination of both, pp. 4-7. Think about their reasons and reasoning tactics, pp. 28-29. The Language of Persuasion: pp. 6-7 and 28-29.
  8. 8. Step 4: What words does the author use? Type of language or words with connotations: Many words have connotations or a meaning in additional to the dictionary meaning. Emotive language Loaded language Inclusive and exclusive language Figurative language (See The Language of Persuasion, pp. 35–38; Ex.23 & 24 and p. 76)
  9. 9. Step 5: On the attack Authors improve their own argument by criticising others. They may: make harmful remarks or to set up a person for ridicule; question a person’s level of intelligence; and question a person’s moral standards. (See The Language of Persuasion, pp. 35–38; Ex.23 & 24 and p. 76)
  10. 10. Step 6: appealing to your thoughts and feelings
  11. 11. Step 6: appeals and impact Authors appeal to our emotions to: encourage us to take action; forge a common bond and direct our sympathy; make us “feel” and understand another person’s situation and views; win our trust and confidence; direct our anger towards those who are responsible for another’s suffering or a situation of injustice; and make us feel guilty or heartless.
  12. 12. See “appeals” table: values (TheLanguageofPersuasion,Appeals,Exercise14,p.21.)
  13. 13. Learning the lingo It is important to learn a range of analytical vocabulary so that you can write with confidence. Learn tone words and main contention words (See pp 77- 80) Study the sample responses that model appropriate metalanguage. (See The Language of Persuasion, pp. 35–38; Ex.23 & 24 and p. 80)
  14. 14. The “lingo” cont’d Learn the main contention words on p. 80 Mr Trippler condones the use of violence displayed among AFL players. Mr Smith decries the use of violence among AFL players. Ms Winter is sceptical of the AFL’s attitude towards violence. The editor discredits the AFL management team because of its attitude towards violence. The interviewer casts aspersions on the AFL’s policies relating to sexual offences. (See The Language of Persuasion, pp. 35–38; Ex.23 & 24 and p. 80)
  15. 15. Some exercises Exercise 12, p. 18 Hoon menace While the hoons ( ) skid around the corners undetected at 100 kmh in residential zones, the real “crims” are being caught red-handed ( ) on the freeways often doing a staggering 10 kmh over the speed limit. ( ) Better still, many motorists are getting caught during the 40 kmh school-zone period. It’s a great cash cow con ( ). Johnny Familyman (See Language of Persuasion, “The author’s words”, pp. 15-18.) Insert the numbers into the brackets. 1. sarcastic tone 2. colloquial language/ negative connotations 3. idiom/alliteration 4. cliché/metaphor
  16. 16. Your Say: Exercise 12, p. 18 “Hoon menace” by Mr Johnny Familyman “Hoons”: 2. colloquial language “Caught red-handed”: 4. cliché/ metaphor “10 kmh over the speed limit”: 1. sarcastic tone “Cash cow con”: 3. idiom/ alliteration (See Language of Persuasion, p. 18)
  17. 17. Write a paragraph analysing Mr Familyman’s word choices: (See suggested responses/online support) Mr Familyman sarcastically discredits police, who, he believes, are not targeting the true offenders. He uses pejorative terms such as “hoons” and colloquial and sarcastic language such as “real crims” to address members of the public on a familiar level and to invite them to share his ridicule towards the police. Accordingly, he seeks to win the public’s support for his view that the police are failing to protect our neighbourhoods. He appeals to our hip-pocket nerve by stating metaphorically that we are the ones being caught “red-handed”. This phrase derides the police and seeks to anger the public about the lack of safety. He cynically suggests that the police pursue these trivial offences instead of catching the “hoons”. By using these words in a sarcastic and derogatory way, Mr Familyman questions the motives and credibility of police officers. Their purpose is to make members of the public sufficiently incensed so that they exert pressure on the police to take greater disciplinary action against offenders who are speeding around residential housing areas. (The Language of Persuasion, “Suggested Responses”, Online support)
  18. 18. (TheLanguageofPersuasion,Appeals,Exercise15,p.22.) Exercise 15
  19. 19. Link to author’s views and tone Main contention: Mr Simon advocates smacking as a useful disciplinary tool. Purpose: seeks to justify smacking; reassure parents that smacking is useful and non-intrusive; it is an important parenting tool. (Language of Persuasion, “Suggested Responses”, CD-ROM)
  20. 20. A range of appeals Exercise 15: At your discretion (parentswatch.com.au) p. 22  Appeal: fear. The author scares parents by suggesting that they will have disobedient and spoilt children if they do not smack them.  Appeal: the author makes a moral appeal. Mr Simon believes that parents who smack their children are acting correctly because they are teaching them the difference between right and wrong.  Appeal: the author appeals to duty of care/ authority. Mr Simon believes that parents should have the authority to discipline their children in the best way possible.  Appeal: individual rights. The author recognises that some people maintain that children have rights and that they need to be free to explore their world and take risks.  Appeal: family values. The author believes that a smack helps parents build a sense of trust among family members. It also shows children that they do care, and that sometimes strong discipline is needed as the mark of loving parents.
  21. 21. Chapter 2 Choose a current issue. Collect a sample of articles from the newspaper and from an online source. Complete the exercises/tables in this chapter. They will help you analyse the language features authors use to persuade us to adopt their views. (Fill in the Tables on pp. 43- 69You cannot feed all the cats… but you can try …
  22. 22. Chapter 2 Study the features of a range of persuasive texts: Editorials and opinion articles Letters, blogs and Your Say comments Presentations and speeches Radio editorials and interviews Current affairs programs and TV interviews Images and cartoons
  23. 23. Table of comparisons
  24. 24. Student’s typical response (Year 9), p. 13 Better Essays and Persuasive Techniques: pp. 43-70. See “Flash of frustration”, p. 13: Tracey writes: Pete Crun believes that there must be more done to stop reckless truck drivers. Adopting an exasperated and dogmatic tone, he condemns the government for not doing more to stop the careless motorists, and the drivers for travelling at such ‘speeds that they can’t stop’. He compares European highway rules to the ones of Australia, asking why we can’t implement rules that minimise the chance of truck accidents. He uses colloquial language – “carked it”, “it’s a hoot”, and “give a stuff”, and alliteration – “metal monsters”, and “right up your rear”. He uses the anecdote of the Hedway Tunnel accident to show how contemptuous trucks can be. “When will these freeway bullies realise,” Crun says “they have to follow the same road rules as everyone else?”
  25. 25. Improvements: “Flash of frustration”, p. 13 Tracey uses a series of sentence models and metalanguage to improve analytical accuracy. For example: (Tone)Dogmatically,MrCruncondemnstherecklessdrivinghabitsoftruckdriversthat causechaos anddeathonourroads. (Bigpicture)ThecomparisonbetweentheEuropeanandtheAustralianroadruleshighlightstheneedforapreferablesolutionon ourfreeways.
  26. 26. Year 9: outcomes, p. 13. TheauthorjuxtaposesthecourteousdrivinghabitsofEuropeantruckdriverswiththeinconsideratehabitsofAustraliantruckdriverstohighlighttheneed forgreaterrespect. (wordchoice/attack)Thecolloquialreferencetothefactthatdrivers“don’tgiveastuff”drawsattentiontotheirirresponsibleattitude. Accordingly,Mr Crunexpectsallconcernedmotoriststofeelindignantatthemannerinwhichthetruckdriversundermineroadsafety. (wordchoice/attack)Thealliterativereferencetothe“metalmonsters”highlightsthethreateningbehaviour ofthetruckdrivers. ItsusereflectsMrCrun’s attempttoshameorisolatetruckdriversandencouragemoreconsiderateattitudes.
  27. 27. Year 10: outcomes, p. 63 Students will write a cohesive paragraph: A model paragraph p. 63. (Viewpoint) Sam Trimbone gives a speech to students at Forest Bank College and urges them to stop using social media and devote more time to their studies. (Tone) In a conversational and confessional tone, Sam presents himself as former school student who was obsessed with technology in order to gain the trust of his student-audience and show that he could have missed out on his dream. (Techniques) His first-hand experience is a clever tactic to win their support and prepare them for his criticisms of students’ obsession. (Purpose)
  28. 28. Student’s example, p. 22 Chief executive officer, Mr Jason Simon uses an authoritative tone throughout his argument. Mr Simon advocates smacking as a useful tool to discipline disobedient children. Mr Simon pressurises parents to use this technique of discipline against their children. He seeks to reassure parents that smacking is sometimes necessary and useful. Mr Simon uses colloquial and idiomatic language to make the scenario more relatable to the reader. The use of euphemism gives the reader a perspective of seeing that from another angle. Using generalisations, Mr Simon convinces the reader and parents that all children “love to be disobedient” and need smacking as a result of good behaviour. The use of colloquialism is used to persuade readers to agree that smacking is useful. He states that it is part of the duty of parenting. He also justifies smacking by using moral values and by referring to the outcome.
  29. 29. Suggested improvements The paragraph consists of a list of techniques, with a general or vague connection to the author’s point of view. It is important to prioritise the techniques; start with the most obvious technique and impact; show relationships between the techniques and think about the flow of the paragraph. First practice writing some specific sentences and their purpose.
  30. 30. Outcomes: rewrite the paragraph  Chief executive officer, Mr Jason Simon uses an authoritative tone to advocate smacking as a practical tool to discipline children. Through the depiction of children and a variety of appeals the author seeks to reassure parents that smacking is sometimes necessary and useful. Mr Simon uses colloquial and idiomatic language such as “to spit the dummy” to depict children as selfish and unruly. His generalisation, “they love to be disobedient”, also encourages readers to see them as resistant to authority. For this reason, Mr Simon pressures us to recognise that smacking is necessary. Mr Simon also uses a variety of clichéd references (“spit the dummy”) and appeals to allay concerns parents might have about smacking. For example, the (euphemistic) phrase, “gentle reminder on the butt” downplays the potential for violence and appeals to family values; it reassures parents that smacking is part of their duty of care as a parent. Morally, parents are encouraged to see smacking as necessary to teach appropriate value systems — “it helps to teach them right from wrong”. The rhetorical question, “so how can it be harmful” , reinforces the point that it is not an aggressive tool.
  31. 31. Chapter 3: write an essay Essay plans Write your essay (see pp 73-76) based on a range of views relating to: Should we ban the mob tackle?
  32. 32. Ready for the next step You are now ready to work through The Language of Persuasion: an essay writing guide (2015) This workbook consists of practical tips and guidelines to help you perfect your essay-writing skills and write with confidence. See englishworks.com.au for an outline and for the next slideshow.
  33. 33. Resources include: Suggested responses E-books with exercises (downloadable and writable) An e-licence (and class sets) Better Essays and Persuasive Techniques: pp. 77-94.

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