THE ART OFINTERVIEWING         Jesse McLean          @jmclean3       Waterford Kettering HS           Waterford, MI       ...
Game plan  Find                         Prepare                                  logistics                        intervie...
SOURCES
Select sourcesExpert/informant                         Reaction/emotion                                  Subject/focus    ...
Select StyleStudio           On-location                              remote                                  Man on the s...
PREPARE
Questions to ask                          yourself        1                                                      1. What d...
Brainstorming                      questions                                                 1. Write a list              ...
Brainstorming                                         Questions                                                           ...
LOGISTICS
FLICSframing            Lighting                                Clutter                                 Sound          JES...
THE ACTUAL INTERVIEW
Interview tipsDo your homeworkWarm them upCoach themKeep it conversationalLISTEN!      JESSE MCLEAN   |   THE ART OF INTER...
Interview tips                              (part 2)Stay neutralMinimize your vocalsAvoid making it about youAsk them if t...
Katie knows                            bestJESSE MCLEAN   |   THE ART OF INTERVIEWING   |   JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012   | 1...
Q&AJESSE MCLEAN   |   THE ART OF INTERVIEWING   |   JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012   | 11/16/12
Contact Mejmclean3@gmail.com@jmclean3 facebook.com/ketteringmcleanlinkendin/in/jessmcleanyoutube.com/wkhstv  JESSE MCLEAN ...
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Art of interviewing by Jesse McLean

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Interviewing someone may seem simple, but getting a good interview is an art. Learn how to select your sources, then make them start talking with ease. Get to know some technical and stylistic tips for getting solid sound bites and much more. Created by Jesse McLean for the 2012 Fall JEA Conference in San Antonio.

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  • Obtain the interviewee's knowledge about the topic (experts, professors, public officials, police, principals, etc.)\nObtain the interviewee's opinion and/or feelings about the topic (get the reaction shots, people affected by your story, people with emotional attachment to your story)\nFeature the interviewee as the subject (the whole story revolves around your person, and your interview is to get information and emotion)\n
  • - Depends on the story you’re covering and the kind of story you’re doing - for instance studio interview - more formal and planned out, etc.\n - all require the same process, some just may be faster than others\n
  • Contacting and making arrangements with the interviewee(s)\n Choosing a location\n Preparing equipment\n Traveling to the location and setting up\n Final briefing and technical checks\n
  • 1. As journalists - most of us are naturally curious people - so what are your immediate questions?\n2. Think about who would care about this story - what would they ask?\n3. Who are the sources that you know you have access to?\n4. Who are the closest people to this? If your school just changed their grading policy - who were the people that made those decisions but also who does it affect the most?\n5. How can you make sure you’re getting a balance here? If you talk to the principal about the new policy - you better believe the students deserve a chance to voice their opinion, too.\n
  • These are not questions, you will memorize and follow as a script - these are idea generators and a fall back\nNEVER give Qs to your interviewees ahead of time.\n
  • Green Light - encourages subjects to provide expansive amplified responses. (anecdotes, opinions, context, etc.). \nOpen-ended questions typically begin with words such as "Why" and "How", or phrases such as "Tell me about...". Often they are not technically a question, but a statement which implicitly asks for a response.\n\nYellow Light - yes/no responses, no quotable answers. Are you racist vs. How would you describe your attitude towards other races?\n\nRed Light - Overly complicated questions that use loaded language\n
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  • Framing - rule of 3rds, look room, headroom, etc.\nLighting - 2/3 of their face should be brightly lit, 1/3 soft light, not in front of windows, avoid mixing light\nClutter - crop out distractions (messy desks, kids waving, etc.) and use depth of field if at all possible. Background should be relevant\nSound - Bobbi Templet talked about without sound you’re f’d\nMake sure you mic your interviewee up\n
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  • Do your homework - research beforehand (give example from Examiner - Top Chef Spike Mendlehson and fedora \n Warm them up: Say your name and spell it, breakfast this morning, day starting now backwards\n Coach Them: Tell them to repeat the question in their answer, to look at you, to pause after you ask questions, etc.\n Keep it Conversational - This is partly why you don’t want to give questions ahead of time. Want them to feel comfortable. Make eye contact - make them feel like you care and are interested.\n LISTEN!!!! This is probably the most important tip out of all of them. DO NOT follow a script. Make sure you ask follow up questions. If they don’t give you enough info ask: What do you mean by that? Give me some examples? In order to listen - sum up what they’ve said. Pause by response. Give example of: “Yes, I like the new grading policy because it helped me cheat through school...” or something like that. YOU MUST FOLLOW UP\n \n
  • \n Stay neutral. Try not to ooze bias. Don't appear to be persuaded by the subject's opinions. Don't judge or directly criticize the subject.\n Minimize your own vocals (in video and audio interviews). Ask questions clearly and succinctly, then let the person speak without any more words from you. Learn to react silently as the subject talks — rather than saying things like "uh-huh, right, I see", use nods and facial expressions.\n It's not about you. Don't talk about yourself or add your own opinion. Your questions can be long enough to add information or interest about the topic, but the interviewee is who the audience wants to hear from.\n When you finish the interview, put your notebook or recorder away and have an informal chat. As well as being polite and leaving a good impression, you might be surprised at what additional information flows when the subject thinks it's all over and is more relaxed.\n Ask them if there’s anything you missed.\n
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  • Art of interviewing by Jesse McLean

    1. 1. THE ART OFINTERVIEWING Jesse McLean @jmclean3 Waterford Kettering HS Waterford, MI Fall 2012 #hsjtx
    2. 2. Game plan Find Prepare logistics interviewsources Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    3. 3. SOURCES
    4. 4. Select sourcesExpert/informant Reaction/emotion Subject/focus JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    5. 5. Select StyleStudio On-location remote Man on the street JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    6. 6. PREPARE
    7. 7. Questions to ask yourself 1 1. What do I want to know? 2. What does my audience need to know?5 2 3. Who is the most likely to give me what I need? 4. Who is the closest to the action or issue? 5. Who are the people I need to talk 4 3 to to get all sides of the story? JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    8. 8. Brainstorming questions 1. Write a list 2. Number them in order of importanceJESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    9. 9. Brainstorming Questions “Many say their favorite part of“Tell me what your the JEA Conference is learning experience has “Do you like the JEA new things, while others say they love meeting fellow journalists..been like at the JEA Conference?” Which is your favorite and why do you think people like either Conference?“ thing?Also, have you been using the hashtag?Green light Questions Yellow light questions Red light questions Open-ended Close-ended Overly complicated/Loaded JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    10. 10. LOGISTICS
    11. 11. FLICSframing Lighting Clutter Sound JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    12. 12. THE ACTUAL INTERVIEW
    13. 13. Interview tipsDo your homeworkWarm them upCoach themKeep it conversationalLISTEN! JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    14. 14. Interview tips (part 2)Stay neutralMinimize your vocalsAvoid making it about youAsk them if there’s anything you missedEnd with an informal chat JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    15. 15. Katie knows bestJESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    16. 16. Q&AJESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12
    17. 17. Contact Mejmclean3@gmail.com@jmclean3 facebook.com/ketteringmcleanlinkendin/in/jessmcleanyoutube.com/wkhstv JESSE MCLEAN | THE ART OF INTERVIEWING | JEA FALL CONFERENCE 2012 | 11/16/12

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