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Activity 3 Mobius Toy, Inc.

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Activity 3 Mobius Toy, Inc.
Team Green
Cross-Border Innovation at Harvard Summer School 2013

Published in: Education, Technology
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Activity 3 Mobius Toy, Inc.

  1. 1. Ideation and Development Processes of Choosing the Prototype Idea: Documentation of Standard Protocol for Playground Meetings 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 1 Activity #3
  2. 2. Designing the Ideation Process 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 2 Approach Steps Brainstorming Image visualization technique: Show random pictures in playground meeting and draw connections to potential problems (ex. Picture of a car can connect to road safety for children) Director/employee suggestions from personal experiences Fieldwork: Observe children in classrooms, playgrounds, and parks Identify key causes of the problems Focus group and/or expert interviews Define focus group and find members (ex. Parents, teachers, children, child psychologists) Conduct focus group with a facilitator for discussion on problems/struggles for parents and children Share and consolidate findings among directors Mind-mapping Organize and cluster ideas to provide more structure Present how ideas connect or differ in a visual manner Market research Observe buying behavior in toy stores or sections Identify currently existing problem-solving products The next product of Mobius Toy, Inc. aims to solve existing problems for parents and children. The following process describes how existing problems will be identified.
  3. 3. Development Process 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 3 Objectives Questions for consideration 1. Level of innovation How different is the product compared to existing products in the marketplace? 2. Target market What is the size of the target market for a given prototype? 3. Estimated cost What is the estimated cost of production and marketing? 4. Educational value and level of parent interest What does this toy teach children? Will parents be interested in buying it? 5. Level of fun and interaction How entertaining is the toy? Does it require interaction with another person? 6. Eco-friendliness Can the toy be made of eco-friendly and sustainably harvested materials? How big is the estimated carbon footprint of its production? Directors will develop prototype ideas to address the chosen problem and vote on the prototype ideas in playground meetings. Votes will assign a value of 1 to 5 for each of the following objectives, with 1 as the worst rank and 5 as the best. The idea with the highest score will be chosen.
  4. 4. Flow Chart of Ideation and Development Process 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 4 Un-met problem identification • Brainstorming: image visualization technique, Director/emplo yee suggestions, fieldwork • Focus group/expert interviews with parents/teachers/children psychologists (dir. Claudia) Identified problems communicated to Claudia, who will keep a log and schedule playground meetings for directors and employees with specific expertise 1st playground meeting: problem presentation Presentations by Claudia (for problems identified through focus group) and directors/employees that have identified potential problems. Vote on problem to be addressed. 2nd playground meeting • Market research presentation (Jean-Luc) • Children psychologist (identification of key causes of the problem) 3rd playground meeting Presentations of prototype. Each director/employee presents a couple of ideas. No Judgment zone 4th playground meeting Ideas brainstorming to refine the initial concept. No judgment zone 5th playground meeting: Prototypes ideas ranking Ideas evaluated (from all directors and employees involved in the process) from 1 to 5 (5 highest score) on the following objectives 1.Level of innovation 2.Target market size 3.Estimated Cost (production+ marketing) 4.Education value and level of parent interest 5.Level of fun and interaction 6.Eco-friendliness 6th playground meeting: Prototype presentation Stefano in collaboration with idea champion and eco-material consultant will build a prototype. Playground members will evaluate prototype and give feedback for improvement. Elizabeth (operation director: selection of companies where to outsource the production) and Jean-Luc (marketing) will direct the product launch in the marketplace
  5. 5. Problem Identification 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 5 Potential problems identified in ideation process: Directors voted to address the problem of teaching children to respect and protect the environment. Children do not know how to manage technology and/or find other ways of entertainment besides technology Children must be taught the importance of respecting and protecting the environment Children often do not know how to stand up for themselves and how to address bullying Children sometimes struggle with physical coordination Children should be educated to accept diversity (cultural and religious) Children need to learn orientation skills and how to take care of themselves Children may have difficulties communicating their feelings clearly Parents have difficulties communicating violent/traumatic events happening (ex. Loss of loved ones or tragic events like Newtown shooting) Parents want their children to learn different languages Parents want to teach their children anger management and patience Parents want to teach their children the importance of eating healthy and leading a healthy lifestyle. Parents want to teach their children math and quantification skills
  6. 6. Ideation 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 6 Idea Description Champion 1. Card Game Each pack comes with 8 collectible cards containing a picture/diagram/icon related with environmental issues. It is played by two children who have to guess the image on the card by making yes/no questions. The one who guesses first wins. Stefano 2. Strategic Board Game This board game requires at least two players, who will take on different roles: environmentalist, corporate representative, and scientist (researcher). Each player has certain responsibilities and abilities designated by the rules. The team of players will work together to try to prevent rapid deforestation that is occurring in different parts of the world. Players will draw cards allowing players to take action or detailing good or bad events. For example, cards could say that trees are being cut down in one region (bad event), or that the environmentalist (for example) can travel to one area to plant seeds (good event), etc. The players lose if the deforestation reaches a certain level in each region, and they win if they're able to plant enough trees and the forests recover to a designated level for each region. Elizabeth 3. Carbon Footprint board game The goal of the game is to reach the final square. The player who reaches it first wins. Players move from space to space by throwing dice and moving their pawn the corresponding number of steps. The various spaces contain actions that can increase or decrease the carbon footprint. When a pawn lands on a cell with a negative action, it will be forced to go back some spaces (depending on how much the actions influence the carbon footprint); vice versa a positive action will allow the player to move its pawn forward. Pawns and dice will be assembled through the origami technique. Claudia 4. Family Trivia The goal of the game is to test the general level of knowledge of eco-friendliness. The toy is shaped like the company logo and represents infinite possibilities of making environmentally friendly choices. The players will either roll dice or spin an arrow that will advance the user on a board that is color coded. There are 4 colors, each representing an environmental area such as Forestation/Water/ Earth/ Energy. Users gain a color card when they respond correctly to a question. The user that has all 4 colors in the shortest time frame wins the game. Users that do not respond correctly have to give up a color that they have already earned. Other options such as skipping a turn will also be included to continue motivating the game. The game teaches the user to think about the different available choices in relation to the environment. The target is that players gain a new understanding in a fun way and begin to practice the choices they have learned. Carine 5. Family Challenge The game revolves around fulfilling tasks that are environmentally friendly in order to earn points that are accumulated on a scoreboard. The family decides on specific measurable tasks and places markers next to the place where the task has to be fulfilled (e.g. saving water while showering). During a week, the family plays the game and collects points so that a winner can be awarded each week. In addition we will provide an online platform and/or mobile app that allows challenges across families. Furthermore whole schools and/or classes can compete and earn prizes that we will collect by sponsors. Jean-Luc The following ideas for prototypes were selected to match with the objectives in the next step:
  7. 7. Development 7/16/2013 Harvard Summer School, Cross-Border Innovation, Team Green: Stefano Angeli, Claudia Dall’Osso, Carine Melhorn, Jean-Luc Winkler, Elizabeth Wu 7 Idea 1 Idea 2 Idea 3 Idea 4 Idea 5 Objective 1 2.8 2.4 2.4 3.6 3.4 Objective 2 4.8 3.8 4 2.4 4.2 Objective 3 3.8 3.8 2.2 3.2 4.2 Objective 4 3.4 4.2 4.2 2.8 5 Objective 5 4.8 4.6 5 3.8 2.6 Objective 6 4.2 4.4 3.2 3.6 4.8 Ø value 3.97 3.87 3.5 3.23 4.03 The ideas were evaluated by voting on the ability to fulfill the objectives. Each Director voted by giving 1 to 5 points, 5 being the best score. The numbers represent the average value of all directors’ votes. Idea #5 has the best ability to meet the objectives. Family Challenge

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