Flipped flipped

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Educause 2013.

Based on data gathered from both students and faculty after a semester of teaching and learning in Michigan State's active learning classrooms, we'll briefly discuss what really works when it comes to flipped and blended environments.

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  • After their first day of teaching in MSU’s brand new active learning spaces, we sent a survey asking basically “how was your day?” followed by several questions surrounding their teaching plans and strategies for the semester.
  • In response to the question “I think my students’ response to their first day in the REAL classroom was:” this was my favorite answer. And quite apt, I think, when you think about people diving into active teaching (and learning) for the first time.
  • Overwhelmingly, faculty thought the first day went well
  • And, overall students seemed to enjoy the REAL classroom experience, of the students who responded to the survey after classes concluded (we had a 15% response rate to our survey)
  • Informally, for this presentation, I asked faculty members around campus what theyhad heard from students as they experimented with active learning. This isn’t IRB, this isn’t formal research. In our IRB we asked how people’s day went. Here, I just casually asked what people were hearing.
  • And we should be scared, in some ways. Because these are feedback snippets I got from workshop attendees who participated in active learning exercises. These are faculty members echoing what we’re afraid to hear from students.Context is important, right? But, there are ways to mediate this. Active learning isn’t easy, ESPECIALLY the first time you encounter it. For the people teaching, or the people learning. I expected this feedback. I knew it would be brutal. But it is valuable, and this teaching style is valuable. And we have to work hard to make it successful. So, finally here are some ways to do that.
  • What works:Scenarios, roundtable discussions, short, in-class group projects – the technology generated a lot of excitement, as did the environment.What sort of works: ice breakers, generating questionsWhat we aren’t trying much, but see put forward as ideas: one minute collaborative papers, web scavenger hunts, cumulative group projects
  • Scenarios and case studies were the most popular by far
  • And, while all classes said overwhelmingly that the group environment promoted their understanding of the class content either somewhat or a lot, I drilled down to our classes with the highest response rate here, for illustrative purposes… the bigger picture tended to be more positive overall.
  • Qualitative student feedback, post-course
  • And we should be scared, in some ways. Because these are feedback snippets I got from workshop attendees who participated in active learning exercises. These are faculty members echoing what we’re afraid to hear from students.Context is important, right? But, there are ways to mediate this. Active learning isn’t easy, ESPECIALLY the first time you encounter it. For the people teaching, or the people learning. I expected this feedback. I knew it would be brutal. But it is valuable, and this teaching style is valuable. And we have to work hard to make it successful. So, finally here are some ways to do that.
  • Flipped flipped

    1. 1. The Flip Side of Flipped: What the data say about engagement in the active learning classroom IT Services Teaching and Learning | Michigan State University Presented by: Jessica Knott, jlknott@msu.edu - @jlknott Teaching and Learning Lightning Round Educause Annual Conference, 2013
    2. 2. “How was your day?”
    3. 3. We hear…
    4. 4. And even from each other…
    5. 5. “So, what works?” According to the students…
    6. 6. “Very cool technology” “I enjoyed the group work environment” “Could be improved if one computer was provided per station”
    7. 7. “So, what works?” According to the faculty…
    8. 8. “Be very explicit in your instruction about teamwork. Be sure to make it part of the course, assign points to some of the activities, and most important, teach students HOW to effectively be a team-member.”
    9. 9. “Competition among the groups seemed to be an effective way to make the groups work more efficiently. I gave them the assignment and the group that finished first would get 6 extra points to their homework grade, group that finished second would get 5 pointes, etc.”
    10. 10. “Make recorded lectures short, faster, and engaging… I would not recommend a recorded lecture longer than 25 minutes (that is when I started getting email complaints).”

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