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1   Introduction2   Where does the IEP Start?3   The Client Interview4   What to Look For? The 7 Principles5   The IEA Rep...
Where to Start?Get in The  Habit                     of                    Habit
The Client Interview1. Interview  a. Occupant and Building History  b. Building Occupants,     • Full time     • Part time...
The Client Interview• An Indoor Environmental Consultant should  interview the client carefully before the inspection  to ...
What to Look For?
What to Look For?
What to Look For?• Many homes fall short of the basic requirements  of a healthy home and contain one or more of  hazards ...
What to Look For?• Mold and pests —    roaches    rodents     dust mites• These housing related hazards can cause and  con...
What to Look For?• Since housing conditions can play a significant  role in respiratory health, these hazards can  greatly...
What to Look For?• For instance, lead poisoning in children causes  reduced IQ and attention  span, hyperactivity, impaire...
What to Look For?• Poisonous gases such as carbon monoxide  and radon also pose threats to health.• Carbon monoxide poison...
What to Look For?• The ideal way to maintain healthy homes and  properties is to practice primary prevention  (addressing ...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes        Dry                      Add title text                                          ...
National Center for Healthy Housingwww.nchh.org   www.healthyhomestraining.org
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes1. Dry: Damp houses provide a nurturing  environment for mites, roaches, rodents, and  mo...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes3. Pest-Free: Recent studies show a causal  relationship between exposure to mice and  co...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes4. Safe: The majority of injuries among children  occur in the home. Falls are the most f...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes5. Contaminant-Free: Chemical exposures  include lead, radon, pesticides, volatile organi...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes6. Ventilated: Studies show that increasing  the fresh air supply in a home improves  res...
The IEA Report
The IEA Report• A professionally prepared Indoor Environmental  or Indoor Air Quality Report should clearly  answer the fo...
The IEA Report• Is there an Indoor Environmental or Indoor Air  Quality Concern in the home or office?• What was the cause...
The IEA Report Interview   Inspection   Correction   ConfirmationClient and     Sight       Contain      Inspect Building ...
The IEA Report• A competent Indoor Environmental Assessment  Report should identify, right up front,• What is important an...
The IEA Report• Interview• Areas of Concern• Site conditions (environmental measurements)  –   Temperature  –   Humidity  ...
The IEA Report• The Indoor Environment should be measured  and recorded both  – at rest (with the air conditioning systems...
Site Conditions
Site Conditions "Spray Foam"
Site Conditions Summary• The measurements showed the home had acceptable  levels of relative humidity and particulate matt...
Site Conditions Summary• The measurements of the relative humidity and respirable  particulates decreased after the HVAC h...
Humidity Bloom
Site Conditions Summary• The measurements showed the home had elevated  relative humidity and particulate matter.• The A/C...
Failed PRVI
Site Conditions Summary• The indoor environment was not a clean dust free  environment as was evident by the levels of air...
Post “Self PRVI” Assessment
Post “Self PRVI” Assessment
Site Conditions Summary• The airborne particulate matter PM 2.5 µm, 5 µm  and 10 µm sizes were elevated in the master  bed...
Site Conditions Summary• The indoor environment was not a clean dust  free environment as was evident by the levels of  ai...
Evaporative PTAC
Evaporative PTAC
Site Conditions Summary• The condo had a slight elevation of VOC’s in  parts per million (ppm).• The measurements showed t...
Site Conditions Summary• The condo was cooled with a PTAC in-wall air  conditioner.• The PTAC was NOT equipped with a cond...
The IEA Report Includes•   Visual Inspection findings•   Site Conditions•   Sampling plan (if necessary)•   Laboratory res...
The IEA Report       Add text title                     Add text titleEnvironmental        Visual        Cause and        ...
Whats in the Report?• A professionally prepared Indoor Environmental  Report or Indoor Air Quality Report must be  useful:...
Whats in the Report?• A Professional Indoor Environmental  Assessment is much more than the  collection of samples.• Unles...
Whats in the Report?• A spore trap sample alone cannot accurately  represent all of the indoor environmental  contaminants...
Whats in the Report?     Site               Sample  Conditions             Plan    Visual              Sampling  Inspection
Whats in the Report?• indentify the indoor environmental Concerns  within the home or office and• provide you with the gui...
The Laboratory Report
The Laboratory ReportQualitative or Quantitative• Qualitative  – What is there (is that mold?)  – Not how much is there   ...
The Laboratory ReportQualitative or Quantitative• Quantitative  – What is there  – How much is there     • Most often to t...
The Laboratory Report• Quantitative• Spore Traps - quantitative collection, the  mold spores collected in the sample are  ...
The Laboratory Report• Qualitative• Surface Samples – Swab, Dust, Tape and  Bulk Samples: qualitative sample collection.• ...
The Laboratory Report• According to ACGIH, ―Data from individual  sampling episodes is often interpreted with  respect to ...
The Laboratory Report• In the absence of established acceptable  exposure limits, it is often necessary to use a  comparis...
The Laboratory Report• An Laboratory Report offers  counts, numbers, percentages, or results.• The Laboratory provides the...
The Laboratory Report• The IEP performs the "Indoor Environmental  Assessment"• The Lab tells the IEP what is there and at...
The Laboratory Report• Certain authorities identify certain molds  whose presence indicates excessive  moisture or are Wat...
The Laboratory Report• IESO ―Standards of Practice for the Assessment  of Indoor Environmental Quality‖. Water Damage  Ind...
The Laboratory Report• Sampling and Analysis of Indoor Microorganisms  by Chin Yang Water Damage Indicator Molds  –   Chae...
The Laboratory Report• The EPA Environmental Relative Moldiness  Index (ERMI) Water Damage Indicator Molds  – Stachybotrys...
The Laboratory Report–   Penicillium crustosum,–   Penicillium chrysogenum,–   Aspergillus niger,–   Aspergillus sclerotio...
The Laboratory Report– Penicillium               – Scopulariopsis  brevicompactum,             chartarum,– Paecilomyces va...
The Laboratory ReportThe EPA Environmental Relative Moldiness Index(ERMI) ―Normal‖ species: – Acremonium strictum,        ...
Additional Laboratory Options
Common Indoor Allergens• Indoor Allergen, Cat   •   Indoor Allergen, Rat• Indoor Allergen,       •   Indoor Allergens Grou...
Soot and Smoke•   Fire Investigation Testing Accelerants•   Carbon Black•   Cigarette Smoke•   Combustion By-Products•   S...
Particle Identification•   Common Particle Identification•   Full Particle Identification SM•   Unknown Particle Identific...
VOC and mVOC• Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Screen  GC-FID (High Boiling Point)• Microbial Volatile Organic Compound...
The Laboratory Report• A superficial air test for mold spores risks leaving  the client with ambiguous results,• or even i...
The Laboratory Report• In many cases air samples for mold  spores come back with no elevations even  though the Client con...
What the Client Wants & Needs
What the Client Wants & Needs• The Client wants to know if there is an indoor air  problem in their home involving any unk...
What the Client Wants & Needs•   Is Indoor Environmental Sampling Necessary?•   If Sampling is necessary Why?•   Where? an...
What the Client Wants & Needs• The Visual Inspection should provide a Sampling  Plan specific to the findings in your home...
What the Client Wants & Needs• Are we looking at a "cosmetic-only" concern?• What is the extent of remediation or cleaning...
What the Client Wants & Needs• An Indoor Environmental Assessments is also an  education on the 7 Seven Principles of Heal...
Seven Principles of Healthy Homes        Dry                      Add title text                                          ...
Tools of the Trade
Tools of the Trade                                             ProtimeterLighthouse                      Fluke            ...
Healthy Homes Specialist
Healthy Homes Specialist• Healthy Homes Specialist Credential• NCHH and the National Environmental Health  Association (NE...
Healthy Homes Specialist• To achieve the credential, individuals must  complete a comprehensive exam on the seven  princip...
Healthy Homes Specialist• Be at least 21 years of age;• Have five years of experience in  housing, environmental health, o...
Healthy Homes Specialist• Apply for the HHS credential by completing an  application downloadable at  www.neha.org/credent...
Healthy Homes Specialist• Candidates should review the on-line references  to prepare for the exam.• They may also want to...
Healthy Homes Specialist• The course covers most - but not all - of the  topics on the exam.• For the convenience of stude...
Questions?
John P. Lapotaire, CIECLydia A. Lapotaire, CIECwww.FloridaIAQ.com
IAQ Assessment / Inspection using the 7 Principals of Healthy Homes - Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS - John Lapotaire,...
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IAQ Assessment / Inspection using the 7 Principals of Healthy Homes - Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS - John Lapotaire, CIEC, Orlando #IAQS #IAQ

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IAQ Assessment can be much more effective if you follow the Seven Principals of Healthy homes. Dry, Clean, Pest-Free, Safe, Contaminant-Free, Ventilated, and Maintained.

Your indoor environment is related to many health effects, ranging from allergies and asthma triggered by dust mites, mold and pest residue to cancer or death from combustion pollutants or dangerous fumes.

The good news is that you can make your house a healthy home for your family by applying these seven principles of healthy homes.

John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS
www.FloridaIAQ.com

Published in: Education
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IAQ Assessment / Inspection using the 7 Principals of Healthy Homes - Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS - John Lapotaire, CIEC, Orlando #IAQS #IAQ

  1. 1. 1 Introduction2 Where does the IEP Start?3 The Client Interview4 What to Look For? The 7 Principles5 The IEA Report6 The Laboratory Report7 What the Client Wants & Needs8 Healthy Homes Specialist9 Questions
  2. 2. Where to Start?Get in The Habit of Habit
  3. 3. The Client Interview1. Interview a. Occupant and Building History b. Building Occupants, • Full time • Part time • Visitors • Pets c. Occupant Specific symptoms d. Occupant Areas of concern
  4. 4. The Client Interview• An Indoor Environmental Consultant should interview the client carefully before the inspection to assist in deciding if such a costly Indoor Environmental Assessment and Testing process is really appropriate and cost-justified.
  5. 5. What to Look For?
  6. 6. What to Look For?
  7. 7. What to Look For?• Many homes fall short of the basic requirements of a healthy home and contain one or more of hazards that adversely affect human health.• Research has shown that these housing-related hazards pose a broad spectrum of risks, including the following:
  8. 8. What to Look For?• Mold and pests — roaches rodents dust mites• These housing related hazards can cause and contribute to asthma allergies Respiratory illnesses
  9. 9. What to Look For?• Since housing conditions can play a significant role in respiratory health, these hazards can greatly increase and intensify susceptibility to respiratory illnesses.• Toxic materials such as lead asbestos pesticidesThese hazards can harm human health in a varietyof ways.
  10. 10. What to Look For?• For instance, lead poisoning in children causes reduced IQ and attention span, hyperactivity, impaired growth, reading and learning disabilities, hearing loss, insomnia, and a range of other health, intellectual, and behavioral problems.
  11. 11. What to Look For?• Poisonous gases such as carbon monoxide and radon also pose threats to health.• Carbon monoxide poisoning results in more than 200 accidental deaths a year and, at much lower levels, causes flu-like symptoms, which often go undiagnosed.• Radon can increase the risk of cancer, which is the second leading cause of death among adults and children in the U.S.
  12. 12. What to Look For?• The ideal way to maintain healthy homes and properties is to practice primary prevention (addressing these hazards before they become dangerous problems) using a holistic approach (tackling many hazards at once).• With this in mind, NCHH has identified 7 principals of Healthy Homes that can help Identify and Correct Indoor Environmental Hazards.
  13. 13. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes
  14. 14. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes Dry Add title text Maintained 7 Principles ofClean Healthy Homes Ventilated Pest-Free Contaminant- Safe Free
  15. 15. National Center for Healthy Housingwww.nchh.org www.healthyhomestraining.org
  16. 16. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes1. Dry: Damp houses provide a nurturing environment for mites, roaches, rodents, and molds, all of which are associated with indoor allergens and asthma triggers.2. Clean: Clean homes help reduce pest infestations and exposure to contaminants.
  17. 17. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes3. Pest-Free: Recent studies show a causal relationship between exposure to mice and cockroaches and asthma episodes in children; yet inappropriate treatment for pest infestations can exacerbate health problems, since pesticide residues in homes pose risks for neurological damage and cancer.
  18. 18. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes4. Safe: The majority of injuries among children occur in the home. Falls are the most frequent cause of residential injuries to children, followed by injuries from objects in the home, burns, and poisonings.
  19. 19. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes5. Contaminant-Free: Chemical exposures include lead, radon, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and environmental tobacco smoke. Exposures to asbestos particles, radon gas, carbon monoxide, and second-hand tobacco smoke are far higher indoors than outside.
  20. 20. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes6. Ventilated: Studies show that increasing the fresh air supply in a home improves respiratory health.7. Maintained: Poorly-maintained homes are at risk for moisture and pest problems. Deteriorated lead-based paint in older housing is the primary cause of lead poisoning, which affects some 240,000 U.S. children.
  21. 21. The IEA Report
  22. 22. The IEA Report• A professionally prepared Indoor Environmental or Indoor Air Quality Report should clearly answer the following questions:
  23. 23. The IEA Report• Is there an Indoor Environmental or Indoor Air Quality Concern in the home or office?• What was the cause?• Where is the problem origin?• What containment and cleaning are needed?• What corrective action is required?• How will you confirm the home has been returned to a pre-loss condition?
  24. 24. The IEA Report Interview Inspection Correction ConfirmationClient and Sight Contain Inspect Building Conditions Repair Sample History Visual Clean Confirm Assess. IEP IEP Contractor IEP
  25. 25. The IEA Report• A competent Indoor Environmental Assessment Report should identify, right up front,• What is important and what needs to be done.• When necessary It should support these opinions with competent detailed, professional, and reliable lab work.
  26. 26. The IEA Report• Interview• Areas of Concern• Site conditions (environmental measurements) – Temperature – Humidity – Particulate Matter – VOC’s – CO, CO2
  27. 27. The IEA Report• The Indoor Environment should be measured and recorded both – at rest (with the air conditioning systems off) and – active (with the air conditioning systems running)• There must always be an indoor environment measurement summary
  28. 28. Site Conditions
  29. 29. Site Conditions "Spray Foam"
  30. 30. Site Conditions Summary• The measurements showed the home had acceptable levels of relative humidity and particulate matter in the .3 through 1. µm with the home at rest.• There were elevations of 2.5 µm throughout with the home at rest.• The volatile organic compounds VOC’s were measured at .4 to .5 throughout the home at rest.• .5 is a level considered to be at the high end of what is acceptable.
  31. 31. Site Conditions Summary• The measurements of the relative humidity and respirable particulates decreased after the HVAC had been running. Home active.• The VOC’s leveled out at .5 throughout the home with the AC running. A level considered to be at the high end of what is acceptable. Home active.• .5 is a level considered to be at the high end of what is acceptable.
  32. 32. Humidity Bloom
  33. 33. Site Conditions Summary• The measurements showed the home had elevated relative humidity and particulate matter.• The A/C and power had just been turned on for the inspection.• There was a visible humidity bloom with microbial growth throughout.
  34. 34. Failed PRVI
  35. 35. Site Conditions Summary• The indoor environment was not a clean dust free environment as was evident by the levels of airborne particulate matter.• The measurements were collected after the remediator had ―Self Cleared‖ his remediation.• The visual, environmental measurements and the collected air samples identified a remaining S-520 Condition 2 an indoor environment which is primarily contaminated with settled spores that were dispersed directly or indirectly from a Condition 3 area, and which may have traces of actual growth.
  36. 36. Post “Self PRVI” Assessment
  37. 37. Post “Self PRVI” Assessment
  38. 38. Site Conditions Summary• The airborne particulate matter PM 2.5 µm, 5 µm and 10 µm sizes were elevated in the master bedroom where remediation was performed.• Measurements after the home had been active (A/C running) all environmental measurements decrease.• This reduction of PM eliminates the AC as a possible contributor to the previously recorded elevations.
  39. 39. Site Conditions Summary• The indoor environment was not a clean dust free environment as was evident by the levels of airborne particulate matter.• The measurements were collected after the remediator had ―Self Cleared‖ his remediation.• The visual, environmental measurements and the collected air samples identified a remaining S-520 Condition 2.
  40. 40. Evaporative PTAC
  41. 41. Evaporative PTAC
  42. 42. Site Conditions Summary• The condo had a slight elevation of VOC’s in parts per million (ppm).• The measurements showed the condo had elevated relative humidity with the home at rest that increased with the air conditioner running.• The condo had an elevation of respirable particulate matter throughout with a minimal decrease of particulate matter when the air conditioner was running or Home Active
  43. 43. Site Conditions Summary• The condo was cooled with a PTAC in-wall air conditioner.• The PTAC was NOT equipped with a condensate drain line and was set up to be an evaporative cooling air conditioner.• Not ideal for the hot humid climate of Florida, more suited for dry climates.• The design continually introduced humidity into the condo supporting a humidity bloom.
  44. 44. The IEA Report Includes• Visual Inspection findings• Site Conditions• Sampling plan (if necessary)• Laboratory results• Cause and Origin• Specific recommendations• Executive summary• Inspection Pictures
  45. 45. The IEA Report Add text title Add text titleEnvironmental Visual Cause and Origin SummaryMeasurements Inspection Add text title
  46. 46. Whats in the Report?• A professionally prepared Indoor Environmental Report or Indoor Air Quality Report must be useful: – in exchange for being paid a professional fee to investigate a home or office, an IEP should provide • accurate and useful diagnostic and prescriptive information to his or her client, and • should include not only an identification of Indoor Environmental Concerns, but • Include a cause and origin
  47. 47. Whats in the Report?• A Professional Indoor Environmental Assessment is much more than the collection of samples.• Unless the sample collection was combined with a Visual Indoor Environmental Assessment using the 7 Principals of Healthy Homes, no one can be certain of the extent or presence of any indoor environmental hazards in a home.
  48. 48. Whats in the Report?• A spore trap sample alone cannot accurately represent all of the indoor environmental contaminants or indoor air quality contaminants present in a home.• A spore trap will only include or exclude mold spores as a contributor to elevated respirable particulates measured in the home.
  49. 49. Whats in the Report? Site Sample Conditions Plan Visual Sampling Inspection
  50. 50. Whats in the Report?• indentify the indoor environmental Concerns within the home or office and• provide you with the guidance to take specific corrective action to quickly improve your indoor environment and indoor air quality.
  51. 51. The Laboratory Report
  52. 52. The Laboratory ReportQualitative or Quantitative• Qualitative – What is there (is that mold?) – Not how much is there • Most often to the genus not species • These methodologies do not differentiate between viable and non-viable fungal spores. • Identification to the genus does not allow for the differentiation between Aspergillus and Penicillium spores. – Bulk – Tape - Swab
  53. 53. The Laboratory ReportQualitative or Quantitative• Quantitative – What is there – How much is there • Most often to the genus not species • These methodologies do not differentiate between viable and non-viable fungal spores. • Identification to the genus does not allow for the differentiation between Aspergillus and Penicillium spores. – Spore Trap
  54. 54. The Laboratory Report• Quantitative• Spore Traps - quantitative collection, the mold spores collected in the sample are counted and reported as spores per cm2, spores per gram (or 1000mg), – These methodologies do not differentiate between viable and non-viable fungal spores. – This technique does not allow for the differentiation between Aspergillus and Penicillium spores.
  55. 55. The Laboratory Report• Qualitative• Surface Samples – Swab, Dust, Tape and Bulk Samples: qualitative sample collection.• Swab, Dust and Tape samples are mounted on a glass slide and observed under a bright field microscope and visually identified to the genus – This technique does not allow for the differentiation between Aspergillus and Penicillium spores.
  56. 56. The Laboratory Report• According to ACGIH, ―Data from individual sampling episodes is often interpreted with respect to baseline data from other environments or the same environment under anticipated low exposure conditions.‖
  57. 57. The Laboratory Report• In the absence of established acceptable exposure limits, it is often necessary to use a comparison standard when interpreting data. In this instance, it will be necessary to sample the suspect area as well as a non-suspect area. According to ACGIH,
  58. 58. The Laboratory Report• An Laboratory Report offers counts, numbers, percentages, or results.• The Laboratory provides the results of the samples collected by the IEP who has preformed a thorough visual assessment.• The Laboratory provides the results of the samples collected by the IEP who has prepared a sampling plan resulting from the visual assessment.
  59. 59. The Laboratory Report• The IEP performs the "Indoor Environmental Assessment"• The Lab tells the IEP what is there and at what level – – Qualitative or Quantitative information• The IEP interprets the results
  60. 60. The Laboratory Report• Certain authorities identify certain molds whose presence indicates excessive moisture or are Water Damage Indicator Molds.• The presence of a few spores of indicator mold should be interpreted with caution.• Additionally, it should be recognized that these named molds are not necessarily the only ones of potential significance.
  61. 61. The Laboratory Report• IESO ―Standards of Practice for the Assessment of Indoor Environmental Quality‖. Water Damage Indicator Molds. (currently repealed for review) – Aureobasidium – Penicillium – Aspergillus – Trichoderma – Chaetomium – Stachybotrys – Fursarium – Ulocladium
  62. 62. The Laboratory Report• Sampling and Analysis of Indoor Microorganisms by Chin Yang Water Damage Indicator Molds – Chaetomium – Stachybotrys – Memnoniella – Ulocladium – Aspergillus-Penicillium Group
  63. 63. The Laboratory Report• The EPA Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) Water Damage Indicator Molds – Stachybotrys chartarum, – Eurotium – Chaetomium globosum, (A.)amstalodami, – Cladosporium – Penicillium variabile, sphaerospermum, – Aspergillus flavus, – Aspergillus versicolor, – Aspergillus restrictus,
  64. 64. The Laboratory Report– Penicillium crustosum,– Penicillium chrysogenum,– Aspergillus niger,– Aspergillus sclerotiorum,– Penicillium purpurogenum,– Aspergillus fumigatus,– Penicillium corylophilum,– Aureobasidium pullulans,– Aspergillus ochraceus
  65. 65. The Laboratory Report– Penicillium – Scopulariopsis brevicompactum, chartarum,– Paecilomyces variotii, – Aspergillus– Aspergillus sydowii, penicillioides,– Penicillium spinulosum, – Trichoderma viride.– Wallemia sebi,– Aspergillus unguis,– Scopulariopsis brevicaulis,
  66. 66. The Laboratory ReportThe EPA Environmental Relative Moldiness Index(ERMI) ―Normal‖ species: – Acremonium strictum, cladosporioides v2, – Alternaria alternata, – Cladosporium herbarum, – Aspergillus ustus, – Epicoccum nigrum, – Cladosporium – Mucor & Rhizopus group, cladosporioides v1, – Penicillium chrysogenum, – Cladosporium – Rhizopus stolonifer
  67. 67. Additional Laboratory Options
  68. 68. Common Indoor Allergens• Indoor Allergen, Cat • Indoor Allergen, Rat• Indoor Allergen, • Indoor Allergens Group Cockroach - Cat Dander, Dog• Indoor Allergen, Dog dander, Cockroach,• Indoor Allergen, Dust Dust Mites Mites• Indoor Allergen, Latex• Indoor Allergen, Mouse
  69. 69. Soot and Smoke• Fire Investigation Testing Accelerants• Carbon Black• Cigarette Smoke• Combustion By-Products• Soot• Wood Smoke
  70. 70. Particle Identification• Common Particle Identification• Full Particle Identification SM• Unknown Particle Identification• Nuisance Dust and PM-10 / TSP• Formaldehyde (Off-gassing in Products/Materials)• Formaldehyde in Air NIOSH 2016 / NIOSH 3500• Formaldehyde in Bulk material (Dry)
  71. 71. VOC and mVOC• Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Screen GC-FID (High Boiling Point)• Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Screen TO-15 (Low Boiling Point)• Volatile Organic Scan by GC/MS with Lib Search (req. for IAQ)• Volatile Organic Scan by GC/MS (62 compound list) TO-15 mod.
  72. 72. The Laboratory Report• A superficial air test for mold spores risks leaving the client with ambiguous results,• or even if the test suggests that a problem with mold is present,• the client has no idea – where the problem is, – What is causing the problem or – what to do about it.
  73. 73. The Laboratory Report• In many cases air samples for mold spores come back with no elevations even though the Client continues to have symptoms or reports nuisance odors in their home.• The IEP that only collected air-o-cell spore trap samples with no visual assessment or measured site conditions can provide no professional guidance for the Client.
  74. 74. What the Client Wants & Needs
  75. 75. What the Client Wants & Needs• The Client wants to know if there is an indoor air problem in their home involving any unknown Allergens Asthma Triggers Mold text title
  76. 76. What the Client Wants & Needs• Is Indoor Environmental Sampling Necessary?• If Sampling is necessary Why?• Where? and• Which Type of Sampling is Recommended? – Qualitative or Quantitative – Culturable or non-Culturable – Allergen – Dust, Bulk – Chemical
  77. 77. What the Client Wants & Needs• The Visual Inspection should provide a Sampling Plan specific to the findings in your home or office so you can then determine; – If there is a mold, allergen, asthma trigger, or similar environmental problem in the home or office? – If there is a problem, where is it and how big is it? – Based on the lab results, what is the level of containment and care needed? – What does the lab work indicate about the level of risk to occupants or workers?
  78. 78. What the Client Wants & Needs• Are we looking at a "cosmetic-only" concern?• What is the extent of remediation or cleaning necessary, and• What needs to be changed or repaired on the home or office so that problems dont reoccur?• and, after the cleanup has been completed, was it proper and complete?
  79. 79. What the Client Wants & Needs• An Indoor Environmental Assessments is also an education on the 7 Seven Principles of Healthy Homes.
  80. 80. Seven Principles of Healthy Homes Dry Add title text Maintained 7 Principles ofClean Healthy Homes Ventilated Pest-Free Contaminant- Safe Free
  81. 81. Tools of the Trade
  82. 82. Tools of the Trade ProtimeterLighthouse Fluke MiniRae MMS+Particulate Thermal VOC Meter Moisture Counter Camera Meter Site Site Building MoistureConditions Conditions Envelope Content •Air •Confirm•Temperature •VOC’s Infiltration Moisture •Humidity •mVOC’s •Moisture •Identify wet •Particulates Intrusion building material
  83. 83. Healthy Homes Specialist
  84. 84. Healthy Homes Specialist• Healthy Homes Specialist Credential• NCHH and the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) offer a ―Healthy Homes Specialist‖ credential, designed for health and housing professionals in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors.
  85. 85. Healthy Homes Specialist• To achieve the credential, individuals must complete a comprehensive exam on the seven principles of healthy housing, which include keeping homes: Dry, Clean, Pest- Free, Contaminant-Free, Ventilated, Safe, and Maintained. Individuals seeking the Healthy Homes Specialist credential must:
  86. 86. Healthy Homes Specialist• Be at least 21 years of age;• Have five years of experience in housing, environmental health, or public health;• Achieve a minimum score of 70% on the qualifying examination; and• Successfully complete an online home assessment exercise.
  87. 87. Healthy Homes Specialist• Apply for the HHS credential by completing an application downloadable at www.neha.org/credential/HHS.• Cost of applying for and taking the HHS exam is $150 NEHA members or $205 non-members.• For more information on this credential you can visit www.neha.org to read the fact sheet or contact NEHA’s Credentialing Staff at 303.756.9090 ext. 339.
  88. 88. Healthy Homes Specialist• Candidates should review the on-line references to prepare for the exam.• They may also want to take NCHHs two-day Essentials for Healthy Homes Practitioners Course.
  89. 89. Healthy Homes Specialist• The course covers most - but not all - of the topics on the exam.• For the convenience of students who take the course, the exam will usually be offered at the end of the second day of the training.
  90. 90. Questions?
  91. 91. John P. Lapotaire, CIECLydia A. Lapotaire, CIECwww.FloridaIAQ.com

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