Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Inferring
Goals for this Webinar <ul><li>Be able to explain the difference between an  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an opinio...
Inference -vs- Opinion <ul><li>Opinion - what you think about a text.  This is based on your experiences and understanding...
Example <ul><li>Snow White </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence that the witch is an antagonist, a bad character </li></ul><ul><ul><...
Inference -vs- Assumption <ul><li>An assumption is an inference not based on facts in the text.  It is a random inference....
Example <ul><li>When reading the story about the professor offering a B for not taking the test you assumed, </li></ul><ul...
Inference -vs- Prediction <ul><li>A predication is a specific type of inference.  Making a prediction infers what will hap...
Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>If there is a  question , predict you find an answer. </li></ul><ul...
Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ for example” “such as” </li><...
Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ in other words” “that is” </l...
Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ however” “but” </li></ul></ul...
Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ just as” “likewise” </li></ul...
Inferring - Method 1 <ul><li>Literal Facts, clues, or information from  the text. </li></ul>+ Link facts to topic. How mig...
Inferring Method 2 Text Background  Knowledge inference Think about evidence Think about what you know Make it a logical c...
Goals for this Webinar <ul><li>Be able to explain the difference between an  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an opinio...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Inferring

4,252 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

Inferring

  1. 1. Inferring
  2. 2. Goals for this Webinar <ul><li>Be able to explain the difference between an </li></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an opinion. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an assumption. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and a predication </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Choose the inferring strategy that fits your thinking style and use it to practice inferring. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Inference -vs- Opinion <ul><li>Opinion - what you think about a text. This is based on your experiences and understanding. </li></ul><ul><li>Inference - figuring out what the author thinks of a topic. It is based on the information the author gives you as well as your own personal understanding. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Educated guess not just an opinion </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Example <ul><li>Snow White </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence that the witch is an antagonist, a bad character </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Poisonous apple, evil plans for Snow White, wears black, wants to be the “fairest”, goes nuts when she is not the “fairest.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If I think that all people who wear black are bad, I am expressing an opinion. It is not based on fact. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Inference -vs- Assumption <ul><li>An assumption is an inference not based on facts in the text. It is a random inference. It is not consider the clues or information the author gives. </li></ul><ul><li>An inference is a based on the evidence from the text and, to a lesser extent, on your background knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Too many novice readers base inferences totally on what they know and ignore the author’s information. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Example <ul><li>When reading the story about the professor offering a B for not taking the test you assumed, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The B was a good deal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How lucky the students were </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How stupid those students who remained to take the test really were </li></ul></ul><ul><li>This was not based on clues given by the author. It was an assumption based on your personal experience. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Inference -vs- Prediction <ul><li>A predication is a specific type of inference. Making a prediction infers what will happen next based on what has already happened . Think: “What am I reading to find out?” </li></ul><ul><li>Predications need to be adjusted based on what does happen. Too many readers make outlandish predictions based on “what could happen.” These are not wise predication. </li></ul><ul><li>Predications need to be confirmed to help your reading. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>If there is a question , predict you find an answer. </li></ul><ul><li>If there is a subheading , predict there will be information about that topic. </li></ul><ul><li>If “ therefore ” is used the author is telling you his or her conclusion. Pay attention to it. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ for example” “such as” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ for instance” “in fact” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ to illustrate this point” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You should predict that the paragraphs that follow will illustrate the main idea of a section. An example will follow. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ in other words” “that is” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ consists of” “means” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A restatement of a definition or explanation in simpler language will be made. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ however” “but” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ whereas” “on the other hand” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ in contrast” “in comparison” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ yet” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A difference or unexpected outcome is about to be presented </li></ul>
  12. 12. Examples of Logical Predictions Based on Text. <ul><li>Signal Words: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ just as” “likewise” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ also” “just like” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ similarly” “in the same way” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ moreover” “furthermore” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A continuation or comparison of an earlier idea will be continued. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Inferring - Method 1 <ul><li>Literal Facts, clues, or information from the text. </li></ul>+ Link facts to topic. How might the topic be connect? What else do you know about the facts from the text? = What does the author want me to infer about the topic, based on the facts or clues in the text?
  14. 14. Inferring Method 2 Text Background Knowledge inference Think about evidence Think about what you know Make it a logical connection between the two
  15. 15. Goals for this Webinar <ul><li>Be able to explain the difference between an </li></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an opinion. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and an assumption. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>inference and a predication </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Choose the inferring strategy that fits your thinking style and use it to practice inferring. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have not met the goals, you need to go back through the webinar until you have met the goals. </li></ul>

×