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Phenomenology: Moving from philosophical underpinnings to a practical way of doing

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Ranse J. (2018). Phenomenology: Moving from philosophical underpinnings to a practical way of doing; presentation at the University of Newcastle, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Research Week, Newcastle, NSW, 10th August.

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Phenomenology: Moving from philosophical underpinnings to a practical way of doing

  1. 1. PHENOMENOLOGY: moving from philosophical underpinnings to a practical way of doing Dr Jamie Ranse RN PhD Research Fellow, Emergency Care www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse
  2. 2. • Phenomenologies • Hermeneutics and phenomenologies • Research question(ing) • Doing phenomenology overview
  3. 3. • Relationship with psychology • Influential phenomenologists • Edmund Husserl • Martin Heidegger • Jean-Paul Sartre • Maurice Merleau-Ponty • Hans-Georg Gadamer historical phenomenologies
  4. 4. • Relationship with psychology • Influential phenomenologists • David Jacob van Lennep • Jan Hendrik Van Den Berg • Bas Levering • Max van Manen historical phenomenologies
  5. 5. Essence of things as they are appearing in the conscious awareness of the first person •Properties •Uniqueness and singularity •Thingness of a thing phenomenologies
  6. 6. The stethoscope transforms me from a layperson into a nurse, with tools ready-at- hand. My stethoscope is ready to be used for a particular purpose, auscultation. When I use my stethoscope I am interested in the patient as a whole, but I am concentrating on the sound that is reverberating through the tubing of the stethoscope. I am concentrating on the intricacies of the sound that is being listened to, such as the lub-dub of a heartbeat. Whilst the stethoscope amplifies a sound of interest, I find it difficult to hear the conversations of those nearby or the sound of monitors alarming in the distance. External sounds are reduced to a muffle. I need to concentrate, I need to listen. The stethoscope allows for the unheard to be heard. The unheard provides insight into the patient’s condition. I hear what the patient themselves do not hear; I know what the patient themselves do not know. My auditory insight provides knowledge about the patient’s condition for the sake of planning and evaluating care. phenomenologies
  7. 7. Essence of things as they are appearing in the conscious awareness of the first person •Properties •Uniqueness and singularity •Thingness of a thing •Epoche phenomenologies
  8. 8. Essence of things as they are appearing in the conscious awareness of the first person •Past •The now •The future phenomenologies
  9. 9. Essence of things as they are appearing in the conscious awareness of the first person •Backdrop to the world •Intentionality phenomenologies
  10. 10. Essence of things as they are appearing in the conscious awareness of the first person •Being (dasein) •Perception phenomenologies https://www.theage.com.au/national/victor ia/hospital-woes-hit-ambulance-services- hard-20130709-2pnbn.html
  11. 11. • Hermeneutics / phenomenology relationship • Texts • Hermeneutic circle • Historical horizons • Co-create hermeneutics and phenomenology
  12. 12. . . . being in a hotel room . . . being at home sick . . . sharing a secret . . . caring for someone at end-of-life • What may it be like . . . research question(ing) Ranse, J. & Arbon, P. (2008). Graduate nurses’ lived experience of in-hospital resuscitation: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Australian Critical Care, 21(1), 38–47. Ranse, J. (2017). Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of an out-of-hospital environment following a disaster. Doctorate of Philosophy, Flinders University, South Australia. Ranse K, Ranse J, Pelkowitz M. (2018). Third year nursing students’ lived experience of caring for the dying: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological approach. Contemporary Nurse. 19:1-11. Langeveld, M. J. (1944). The stillness of the secret place. Phenomenology and Pedagogy, 1(1), 11–17. Van Den Berg, J. H. (1972). The psychology of the sickbed. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press. Van Lennep, D. (1987). The hotel room. Phenomenological Psychology (Vol. 103, pp. 209–215). Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands. . . . being a nurse following a disaster . . . being a graduate nurse in a resuscitation
  13. 13. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative a way of doing phenomenology
  14. 14. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative a way of doing phenomenology
  15. 15. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description a way of doing phenomenology
  16. 16. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description a way of doing phenomenology
  17. 17. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description a way of doing phenomenology
  18. 18. a way of doing phenomenology Het melkmeisje (the milkmaid), Painting by Johannes van der Meer, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
  19. 19. a way of doing phenomenology Winter Landscape with Skaters, Painting by Hendrick Avercamp, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
  20. 20. a way of doing phenomenology I stepped off the aeroplane, walked down the air bridge and my feet touched the tarmac. I was home. I have never been so tired. Colleagues, friends and family wanted to hear about my experience. After a while, I needed some time alone. When I returned to work in the hospital, patient and staff concerns relating to the Australian health system seemed insignificant. Patients presenting to the ED were complaining about extended waiting times for what seemed to be trivial ailments. Patients seemed to have a complete disregard for those affected by the disaster on the other side of the world. At times, there were too many people around me. Ranse, J. (2017). Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of an out-of-hospital environment following a disaster. Doctorate of Philosophy, Flinders University, South Australia.
  21. 21. a way of doing phenomenology After a restless and disturbed sleep, I wake up in the morning, not feeling too well. I get out of bed, however, intending to start the day in the usual manner. But soon I notice that I cannot. I have a headache; I feel sick. I notice an uncontrollable urge to vomit and I deem myself so incapable of facing the day that I convince myself that I am ill. I return to the bed I just left with every intention of staying there for a while. The thermometer shows that my decision was not unreasonable. My wife’s cautious inquiry whether I would like something for breakfast makes the reason much clearer. I am really ill. Van Den Berg, J. H. (1972). The psychology of the sickbed. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press.
  22. 22. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoché-reduction a way of doing phenomenology
  23. 23. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoché-reduction a way of doing phenomenology
  24. 24. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoché-reduction • Phenomenological existentials • Spatiality (lived-space) • Corporeality (lived-body) • Communality (lived-relationships) • Temporality (lived-time) a way of doing phenomenology
  25. 25. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoché-reduction • Phenomenological existentials • Protection of human participants a way of doing phenomenology
  26. 26. a way of doing phenomenology I stepped off the aeroplane, walked down the air bridge and my feet touched the tarmac. I was home. I have never been so tired. Colleagues, friends and family wanted to hear about my experience. After a while, I needed some time alone. When I returned to work in the hospital, patient and staff concerns relating to the Australian health system seemed insignificant. Patients presenting to the ED were complaining about extended waiting times for what seemed to be trivial ailments. Patients seemed to have a complete disregard for those affected by the disaster on the other side of the world. At times, there were too many people around me. Ranse, J. (2017). Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of an out-of-hospital environment following a disaster. Doctorate of Philosophy, Flinders University, South Australia.
  27. 27. On the way to the disaster Prior to starting work Working the shift in a disaster End of the shift Returning home Temporality(lived-time) Communality(lived-relationships) Corporeality(lived-body) Spatiality(lived-space) Livedexperience description Reflections a way of doing phenomenology
  28. 28. • Space • Shrinking, then open wide • Drawn-in and shrinking • Drawn-in and looking out • Wide-open and crowded • Occupying, sharing and giving back • Occupying • Sharing • Giving back • Relationships • Being close • Starting relationships • Close, as work becomes home • Relational widening • With patients and their families • Being an insider • With self • By (my)self • Carrying an emotional burden • Questioning the effort examples
  29. 29. Body •When nursing following a disaster • Without technology • Being autonomous •For patients following a disaster • Endless bodies • Injured and ill • Death • Psychosocial well-being • Returning to the hospital patient Time •Speeding up •Slowing down examples
  30. 30. • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From individual narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoché-reduction • Phenomenological existentials • Protection of human participants • Phenomenological appraisal doing phenomenology
  31. 31. PHENOMENOLOGY: moving from philosophical underpinnings to a practical way of doing Dr Jamie Ranse RN PhD Research Fellow, Emergency Care www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse

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