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MEDICAL EMERGENCY TEAMS: graduate nurses interactions, attitudes and perceptions during resuscitation events in the non-cr...
OVERVIEW<br /><ul><li>Background
Purpose
Methods
Findings
Discussion
Recommendations</li></li></ul><li>BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>Previous research has explored the resuscitation experience of:
Bystanders
Laypersons
Volunteer first aiders
Junior doctors
Critical care nurses and
General nurses
Graduate Nurse transition experience</li></li></ul><li>PURPOSE<br />The purpose of this research was to explore, describe ...
METHODS<br />Design<br /><ul><li> Hermeneutic phenomenological</li></ul>Population and Sample<br /><ul><li> Convenience sa...
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Medical emergency teams: graduate nurses interactions, attitudes and perceptions during resuscitation events in the non-critical care environment.

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Paper presented at the ANZICS/ACCCN Intensive Care Annual Scientific Meeting, Rotorua, New Zealand, 26th October 2007.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Medical emergency teams: graduate nurses interactions, attitudes and perceptions during resuscitation events in the non-critical care environment.

  1. 1. MEDICAL EMERGENCY TEAMS: graduate nurses interactions, attitudes and perceptions during resuscitation events in the non-critical care environment<br />Jamie Ranse<br />Research Coordinator<br />Intensive Care Unit<br />The Canberra Hospital<br />
  2. 2. OVERVIEW<br /><ul><li>Background
  3. 3. Purpose
  4. 4. Methods
  5. 5. Findings
  6. 6. Discussion
  7. 7. Recommendations</li></li></ul><li>BACKGROUND<br /><ul><li>Previous research has explored the resuscitation experience of:
  8. 8. Bystanders
  9. 9. Laypersons
  10. 10. Volunteer first aiders
  11. 11. Junior doctors
  12. 12. Critical care nurses and
  13. 13. General nurses
  14. 14. Graduate Nurse transition experience</li></li></ul><li>PURPOSE<br />The purpose of this research was to explore, describe and interpret the lived experience of graduate nurses who have participated in an in-hospital resuscitation event within the non-critical care environment.<br />
  15. 15. METHODS<br />Design<br /><ul><li> Hermeneutic phenomenological</li></ul>Population and Sample<br /><ul><li> Convenience sample
  16. 16. Six graduate nurses</li></ul>Data Collection and Analysis<br /><ul><li> Focus groups
  17. 17. Thematic analysis</li></li></ul><li>FINDING<br />Four main themes:<br /><ul><li>Needing to decide
  18. 18. Having to act
  19. 19. Feeling connected
  20. 20. Being supported</li></li></ul><li>FINDINGS: needing to decide<br />… the CNC was just outside, so I said “come in, have a look, I need to call a MET” … (Liz)<br />One of the educators said to me “they [the MET] are not going to be happy that you called it” … (Ali)<br />… it started off smoothly … once the MET came in they push you out of the road … it went to utter chaos … (Kathy)<br />… there are too many people involved … too many Chiefs and not enough Indians. (Zoe)<br />
  21. 21. FINDINGS: having to act<br />… [I was] unsure as to the first step to take … (Ali)<br />… I will just try, do the best that I can, but don’t expect me to have the knowledge and the skill. (Liz)<br />You secure yourself in that role, like you were as a student … I have no responsibility here. (Zoe)<br />… I found it [a simulated resuscitation event] was similar to a real code (resuscitation event), it’s kind of chaotic … (Zoe)<br />
  22. 22. FINDINGS: feeling connected<br />I just wanted to run the other way. (Megan)<br />… I felt very, very stressed … [the patient in cardiac arrest]<br />was lying in the corridor, I had just pushed the emergency<br />trolley down [to the patients location] and [I decided] I will get<br />the oxygen and the mask. So I ran to a patient’s bedside to<br />grab a mask … I didn’t even think it’s in the trolley that I have just pushed. (Zoe)<br />… they’re interesting ... an amazing experience, sometimes you think that was great. (Liz)<br />It was exciting … and gave me a lot more confidence. (Jess)<br />
  23. 23. FINDINGS: being supported<br /> … the MET team comes and everyone disappears …<br />everyone goes and you’re stuck there … [the MET] need things and you can’t go because you are scribing … (Megan)<br />… [ward nurses will support you] if you are in tears. (Megan)<br />
  24. 24. DISCUSSION<br /><ul><li>Graduate nurses feel stressed in new situations
  25. 25. Similar experience to other cohort
  26. 26. Lack of an opportunity to debrief
  27. 27. Resuscitation events are chaotic
  28. 28. Decision making
  29. 29. Graduate nurses don’t feel publicly tested</li></li></ul><li>RECOMMENDATIONS: practice<br /><ul><li>Non-critical care nurses need to be encouraged to remain involved in the resuscitation process following the arrival of the Medical Emergency Team
  30. 30. Strategies should be employed to ensure an optimal number of people are involved
  31. 31. Participants should be provided with an opportunity to participate in a formal debriefing session</li></li></ul><li>RECOMMENDATIONS: education<br /><ul><li>Non-critical care staff should undertake education and training in advanced life support
  32. 32. Extend beyond basic life support
  33. 33. Simulation that replicates the realities of resuscitation</li></li></ul><li>RECOMMENDATIONS: research<br /><ul><li>Holistic picture of in-hospital resuscitation from other cohorts
  34. 34. Determine the effectiveness of coping strategies</li></li></ul><li>MORE INFORMATION<br />Ranse J, Arbon P. Graduate nurses’ lived experience of in-hospital resuscitation: a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Australian Critical Care. 2008. [accepted]<br />

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