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Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: Psychosocial aspects

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Ranse J, (2019). Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: Psychosocial aspects. Paper presented at the WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, Brisbane, 7th May.

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Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: Psychosocial aspects

  1. 1. Dr Jamie Ranse RN PhD Research Fellow, Emergency Care www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: Psychosocial aspects
  2. 2. overview • Introduction • Methodology • Findings • Discussion
  3. 3. ROLE IN A DISASTER
  4. 4. Ranse J, Lenson S. (2012). Beyond a clinical role: Nurses were psychosocial supporters, coordinators and problem solvers in the Black Saturday and Victorian bushfires in 2009. Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal. 15(3):156-163.
  5. 5. methodology • Phenomenology • Individuals who have had experience(s) • Obtaining narrative • From narrative to a lived-experience description • Epoche-reduction Ranse J. (2017). Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of an out-of-hospital environment following a disaster. Doctorate of Philosophy, Flinders University, South Australia.
  6. 6. Space •Shrinking, then open wide • Drawn-in and shrinking • Drawn-in and looking out • Wide-open and crowded •Occupying, sharing and giving back Relationships •Being close • Starting relationships • Close, as work becomes home • Relational widening •With patients and their families • Being an insider •With self • By (my)self • Carrying an emotional burden • Questioning the effort Time •Speeding up •Slowing down Body •When nursing following a disaster • Without technology • Being autonomous •For patients following a disaster • Endless bodies • Injured and ill • Death • Psychosocial well-being • Returning to the hospital patient findings
  7. 7. Space •Shrinking, then open wide • Drawn-in and shrinking • Drawn-in and looking out • Wide-open and crowded •Occupying, sharing and giving back Relationships •Being close • Starting relationships • Close, as work becomes home • Relational widening •With patients and their families • Being an insider •With self • By (my)self • Carrying an emotional burden • Questioning the effort Time •Speeding up •Slowing down Body •When nursing following a disaster • Without technology • Being autonomous •For patients following a disaster • Endless bodies • Injured and ill • Death • Psychosocial well-being • Returning to the hospital patient findings
  8. 8. Space • Shrinking, then open wide • Drawn-in and shrinking • Drawn-in and looking out • Wide-open and crowded • Occupying, sharing and giving back Relationships • Being close • Starting relationships • Close, as work becomes home • Relational widening • With patients and their families • Being an insider • With self • By (my)self • Carrying an emotional burden • Questioning the effort Time •Speeding up •Slowing down Body •When nursing following a disaster • Without technology • Being autonomous •For patients following a disaster • Endless bodies • Injured and ill • Death • Psychosocial well-being • Returning to the hospital patient findings
  9. 9. Space •Shrinking, then open wide • Drawn-in and shrinking • Drawn-in and looking out • Wide-open and crowded •Occupying, sharing and giving back Relationships •Being close • Starting relationships • Close, as work becomes home • Relational widening •With patients and their families • Being an insider •With self • By (my)self • Carrying an emotional burden • Questioning the effort Time •Speeding up •Slowing down Body •When nursing following a disaster • Without technology • Being autonomous •For patients following a disaster • Endless bodies • Injured and ill • Death • Psychosocial well-being • Returning to the hospital patient findings
  10. 10. discussion • Psychosocial well-being of people affected by disaster • Psychosocial well-being of self
  11. 11. Dr Jamie Ranse RN PhD Research Fellow, Emergency Care www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse Australian civilian hospital nurses’ lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: Psychosocial aspects

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