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Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the
out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-spa...
acknowledgements
• : Annie M Sage Memorial Scholarship
• Supervisors
• Participants
jamieranse
background
• Single events
• Simple descriptive case reports
• Phenomenological perspective lacking
Research question:
• W...
methodology
• Design
• Phenomenology
• Doing phenomenology
• Individual who’ve had experience(s)
• Narrative
• Moments
• L...
findingsMoments
On the way to the disaster
Prior to starting work
Working the shift in a disaster
End of the shift
Returni...
findingsMoments
On the way to the disaster
Prior to starting work
Working the shift in a disaster
End of the shift
Returni...
findings
• Spatiality (lived-space)
jamieranse
Zillman, 2016, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) News Online
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking
In preparing to go to...
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking
• Drawn-in, looking-o...
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking
• Drawn-in, looking-o...
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving b...
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving b...
findings
• Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide
• Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving b...
discussion
• Seems easier to go to a disaster than it does to come home.
• A change to the physical space results in a cha...
conclusion
• Provides insight into what it may be like being an Australian civilian in-hospital
nurse working in the out-o...
Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the
out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-spa...
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Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-space perspective

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Ranse J, Arbon P, Cusack L, Shaban R. (2017) Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-space perspective; paper presented at the 17th WADEM Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine. Toronto, Canada 25th April.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-space perspective

  1. 1. Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-space perspective Jamie Ranse Supervisors: Prof. Paul Arbon, A/Prof. Lynette Cusack and Prof. Ramon Shaban www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse
  2. 2. acknowledgements • : Annie M Sage Memorial Scholarship • Supervisors • Participants jamieranse
  3. 3. background • Single events • Simple descriptive case reports • Phenomenological perspective lacking Research question: • What may it be like being an Australian civilian in-hospital nurse working in the out-of-hospital disaster environment being deployed as part of a health team? jamieranse
  4. 4. methodology • Design • Phenomenology • Doing phenomenology • Individual who’ve had experience(s) • Narrative • Moments • Lived experience description • Epoche-Reduction jamieranse
  5. 5. findingsMoments On the way to the disaster Prior to starting work Working the shift in a disaster End of the shift Returning home jamieranse
  6. 6. findingsMoments On the way to the disaster Prior to starting work Working the shift in a disaster End of the shift Returning home Reflections Spatiality(lived-space) Corporeality(lived-body) Communality(lived-relationships) Temporality(lived-time) jamieranse
  7. 7. findings • Spatiality (lived-space) jamieranse Zillman, 2016, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) News Online
  8. 8. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking In preparing to go to the disaster I started to read about the country, the culture, religion, and the existing health infrastructure. I tried to get a general overview of the countries socio-economic-health status prior to the disaster occurring. I asked others who had been to a previous disaster, “what did you take?” … “what do you think it will be like? What do you think we will see?” jamieranse
  9. 9. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking • Drawn-in, looking-out The temporary health service was established on a local sports field … The final temporary health facility was a combination of a number of individual tents. These tents combined provided a space to provide a variety of health services. At the end of the shift I would call home. I had access to a communal phone. However, I was restricted in the amount of time I could phone home. jamieranse
  10. 10. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Intentionality, drawing-in and shrinking • Drawn-in, looking-out • Wide-open, crowded I walked into the supermarket and there was a large variety of food on the shelves. The options were extensive. Colleagues, friends and family wanted to hear about my experience. After a while, I needed periods of time alone jamieranse
  11. 11. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving back • Occupying During the immediate aftermath of the disaster, normal health clinics were not open to receive patients. The local pharmacies and general practitioners were closed longer than anticipated. So people could not access their prescription medications via their normal means. jamieranse
  12. 12. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving back • Occupying • Sharing Local health care professionals from the closed health clinics assisted us throughout the deployment. I remember working with a local community health nurses, a maternal child health nurse and some local general practitioners. These health professionals had knowledge of the area and links to community health services. jamieranse
  13. 13. findings • Lived-space as shrinking then opening too-wide • Disaster health lived-space as occupying, sharing and giving back • Occupying • Sharing • Giving back As the local health services were re-established, we started to handover our services to the local health care professionals as a strategy to withdraw our services from the region. jamieranse
  14. 14. discussion • Seems easier to go to a disaster than it does to come home. • A change to the physical space results in a change to the way the space is lived. jamieranse
  15. 15. conclusion • Provides insight into what it may be like being an Australian civilian in-hospital nurse working in the out-of-hospital disaster environment being deployed as part of a health team? • Insight that can inform practice, policy, education • A phenomenological perspective raising many questions about an experience jamieranse
  16. 16. Australian civilian hospital nurses' lived experience of the out-of-hospital environment following a disaster: A lived-space perspective Jamie Ranse Supervisors: Prof. Paul Arbon, A/Prof. Lynette Cusack and Prof. Ramon Shaban www.jamieranse.com twitter.com/jamieranse youtube.com/jamieranse linkedin.com/in/jamieranse

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