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Reading Visual Text

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A presentation of Walter Werner's 2002 article titled Reading Visual Texts published in Theory and Research in Social Education

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Reading Visual Text

  1. 1. Reading Visual Text<br />A review of Walter Werner’s 2002 article in Theory and Research in Social Education<br />
  2. 2. Call to use students’ agency to enhance visual reading<br />Active and critical capacities to understand and know<br />Framed by the Birmingham tradition of Cultural Studies<br />Movement rooted in Marxist thought and informed by the work of Antonio Gramsci<br />Cultural hegemony<br />
  3. 3. Peter Seixas’ call for centering social education around cultural studies<br />What does this image tell us about Lincoln the Emancipator?<br />&quot;The Coming Man&apos;s Presidential Career, à la Blondin&quot; by Jacob Dallas. Harper&apos;s Weekly, Aug 25, 1860, p. 544<br />
  4. 4. Three conditions for reading visual texts<br />Authority<br /> Opportunity and Capacity<br /> Community for Engaging<br />
  5. 5. Authority<br />“If students are to engage in multiple readings of an image, they need to be positioned as interpreters”<br />
  6. 6. Open?<br />Closed?<br />Figure 1: “The Industrial Revolution.” Source: William McNeill, The Rise of the West: A History of the Human Community (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1963), 743. © by the University of Chicago.  All rights reserved. <br />http://www.bu.edu/historic/staley.html<br />
  7. 7. Opportunity and Capacity<br />“Multiple readings of images disturb taken-for-granted assumptions underlying “reading” itself (‘Why are different readings possible?’), and focus on the interplay between text and reader.”<br />
  8. 8. Ways to Reading Visual Texts<br />Instrumental<br />Narrative<br />Iconic<br />Editorial<br />Indicative<br />Oppositional <br />Reflexive<br />Closed<br />Resource<br />Storyline<br />Icon<br />Editorial<br />Index<br />Positioning<br />Mirror<br />text as<br />Open<br />
  9. 9. Werner, 2002, p. 408<br />
  10. 10. Instrumental<br />Narrative<br />Iconic<br />Editorial<br />Indicative<br />Oppositional <br />Reflexive<br />Figure 3:  “Hammurabi’s Great Society.”  Source: Source: William McNeill, The Rise of the West: A History of the Human Community (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1963), 57. © by the University of Chicago.  All rights reserved. <br />http://www.bu.edu/historic/staley.html<br />
  11. 11. Community<br />“Multiple readings of images require a supportive classroom discourse (i.e., norms, beliefs, practices, and exemplars) that encourages student authority in reading, and provides ongoing opportunity to engage with multiple readings.”<br />

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