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What is government and articles

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What is government and articles

  1. 1. What is Government???
  2. 2. Government
  3. 3. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies
  4. 4. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power
  5. 5. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive
  6. 6. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive • The power to execute, enforce and administer laws
  7. 7. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive • The power to execute, enforce and administer laws • Legislative
  8. 8. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive • The power to execute, enforce and administer laws • Legislative • The power to make and frame public policies
  9. 9. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive • The power to execute, enforce and administer laws • Legislative • The power to make and frame public policies • Judicial
  10. 10. Government • An institution through which a society makes and enforces public policies • All governments have and exercise three kinds of power • Executive • The power to execute, enforce and administer laws • Legislative • The power to make and frame public policies • Judicial • The power to interpret laws and settle disputes
  11. 11. Democracy
  12. 12. Democracy 1. A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of each person
  13. 13. Democracy 1. A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of each person 2.A respect for the equality of each person
  14. 14. Democracy 1. A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of each person 2.A respect for the equality of each person 3.A faith in the majority rule and instance on protection of minority rights
  15. 15. Democracy 1. A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of each person 2.A respect for the equality of each person 3.A faith in the majority rule and instance on protection of minority rights 4.An acceptance of the necessity of compromise
  16. 16. Democracy 1. A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of each person 2.A respect for the equality of each person 3.A faith in the majority rule and instance on protection of minority rights 4.An acceptance of the necessity of compromise 5.An instance on individual freedom
  17. 17. Free Enterprise
  18. 18. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics
  19. 19. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism
  20. 20. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system
  21. 21. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods
  22. 22. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods • Based of four fundamental factors
  23. 23. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods • Based of four fundamental factors 1. Private ownership
  24. 24. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods • Based of four fundamental factors 1. Private ownership 2. Individual initiative
  25. 25. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods • Based of four fundamental factors 1. Private ownership 2. Individual initiative 3. Profit
  26. 26. Free Enterprise • The American system of economics • Usually referred to as Capitalism • As important as the political system • Private and corporate ownership of capital goods • Based of four fundamental factors 1. Private ownership 2. Individual initiative 3. Profit 4. Competition
  27. 27. American Democracy
  28. 28. Articles of Confederation
  29. 29. Articles of Confederation • The United States’ first attempt at government
  30. 30. Articles of Confederation • The United States’ first attempt at government • Created by the original 13 states
  31. 31. Articles of Confederation • The United States’ first attempt at government • Created by the original 13 states • Adopted March 1, 1781 and remained until March, 1789
  32. 32. Articles of Confederation • The United States’ first attempt at government • Created by the original 13 states • Adopted March 1, 1781 and remained until March, 1789 • Very weak because the states feared one central power
  33. 33. Articles of Confederation
  34. 34. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure
  35. 35. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote
  36. 36. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body
  37. 37. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states
  38. 38. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations
  39. 39. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations • Pledged to obey the decisions of the Congress
  40. 40. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations • Pledged to obey the decisions of the Congress • Provide the funds and troops requested by Congress
  41. 41. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations • Pledged to obey the decisions of the Congress • Provide the funds and troops requested by Congress • Respect decisions made in other states
  42. 42. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations • Pledged to obey the decisions of the Congress • Provide the funds and troops requested by Congress • Respect decisions made in other states • Allow open travel between states
  43. 43. Articles of Confederation • Government Structure • Unicameral Congress, each state had one vote • Lead by the “Presiding Officer” chosen by the body • Could make war and treaties, borrow money, establish post offices, build a navy, raise and army, and settle disputes among states • State Obligations • Pledged to obey the decisions of the Congress • Provide the funds and troops requested by Congress • Respect decisions made in other states • Allow open travel between states • Protect life and property and promote the general welfare
  44. 44. Weaknesses of the Articles
  45. 45. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation
  46. 46. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax
  47. 47. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds
  48. 48. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money
  49. 49. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade
  50. 50. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states
  51. 51. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states • Crippled the early economic system
  52. 52. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states • Crippled the early economic system • Enforcement
  53. 53. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states • Crippled the early economic system • Enforcement • No way to force the states to comply
  54. 54. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states • Crippled the early economic system • Enforcement • No way to force the states to comply • 9 of 13 states had to agree
  55. 55. Weaknesses of the Articles • Taxation • Congress did not have the power to tax • Had to borrow and ask states for funds • Congress was in debt from the revolution and states did not contribute enough money • Trade • No way to regulate commerce between states • Crippled the early economic system • Enforcement • No way to force the states to comply • 9 of 13 states had to agree • Articles could only be changed with unanimous consent
  56. 56. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787)
  57. 57. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt
  58. 58. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt • Foreign and interstate trade laws were complicated under the Articles
  59. 59. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt • Foreign and interstate trade laws were complicated under the Articles • Many people lost jobs
  60. 60. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt • Foreign and interstate trade laws were complicated under the Articles • Many people lost jobs • Farmers were unable to sell their goods at a decent price
  61. 61. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt • Foreign and interstate trade laws were complicated under the Articles • Many people lost jobs • Farmers were unable to sell their goods at a decent price • People were put in jail and their land was seized for not paying taxes
  62. 62. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Western Massachusetts citizens could not pay their debt • Foreign and interstate trade laws were complicated under the Articles • Many people lost jobs • Farmers were unable to sell their goods at a decent price • People were put in jail and their land was seized for not paying taxes
  63. 63. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787)
  64. 64. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Daniel Shay (former Captain in the Continental Army) took up arms and lead 1200 farmers in a revolt against the MA government
  65. 65. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Daniel Shay (former Captain in the Continental Army) took up arms and lead 1200 farmers in a revolt against the MA government • The rebellion focused on a building used for storing weapons
  66. 66. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • Daniel Shay (former Captain in the Continental Army) took up arms and lead 1200 farmers in a revolt against the MA government • The rebellion focused on a building used for storing weapons • The weapons were owned by the national government, but the protestors didn’t care
  67. 67. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787)
  68. 68. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • The national government was weak and couldn’t do anything
  69. 69. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • The national government was weak and couldn’t do anything • Massachusetts was able to call up a militia to put down the revolt
  70. 70. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • The national government was weak and couldn’t do anything • Massachusetts was able to call up a militia to put down the revolt • Four protestors died in the fighting
  71. 71. Shay’s Rebellion (1786-1787) • The national government was weak and couldn’t do anything • Massachusetts was able to call up a militia to put down the revolt • Four protestors died in the fighting • Showed a need for a strong central government
  72. 72. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787
  73. 73. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787 • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: May 25, 1787
  74. 74. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787 • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: May 25, 1787 • Delegates met to fix the Articles
  75. 75. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787 • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: May 25, 1787 • Delegates met to fix the Articles • They ended up creating an entirely new document
  76. 76. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787 • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: May 25, 1787 • Delegates met to fix the Articles • They ended up creating an entirely new document • The new law of the United States was framed in 1787 and ratified by all of the states in 1789
  77. 77. SECOND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION of 1787 • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: May 25, 1787 • Delegates met to fix the Articles • They ended up creating an entirely new document • The new law of the United States was framed in 1787 and ratified by all of the states in 1789 • The new document is fluid and has systems for modifying and amending

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