Digital Exposure of English Place-Names (DEEP) -Stuart Dunn

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Presentation given at the Geospatial in the Cultural Heritage Domain - Past, Present & Future event in London on 7th March 2012. The event was organised as part of the JISC GECO project.

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Digital Exposure of English Place-Names (DEEP) -Stuart Dunn

  1. 1. The Digital Exposure of English Place-names Stuart Dunn Department of Digital Humanities Kings College London 7th March 2012http://englishplacenames.cerch.kcl.ac.uk
  2. 2. Place names• Dynamic• Attested•Contested• Documented and...
  3. 3. ...ResearchedPhotos courtesy of Jo Walsh
  4. 4. DEEP in numbers• 80 years of scholarship• 32 English counties• 86 volumes• 6157 elements• 30,517 pages• c 4,000,000 individual place-name forms• ??? Bibliographic references (we will know soon – it’s quite a lot)
  5. 5. Contestedinterpretations andetymologies
  6. 6. Dates/references
  7. 7. Previous work: CHALICE pilot
  8. 8. Current work (in progress)
  9. 9. Our approach to geography: a point-based historicgazetteer
  10. 10. Our approach to geography: a point-based historicgazetteer
  11. 11. Points, lines and polygons are problematic!•Pre-OS there is very little data on geographicassociations of place-names(http://chalice.blogs.edina.ac.uk/files/2011/06/VCH_FINAL1.pdf) Hadrian’s Wall Roman•Points are arbitrary bridgeheaddependent on scale Modern• Administrative course of R. Irthinggeographies change overtime • Even natural features can mislead
  12. 12. We need crowd sourcing to: •Correct errors/omissions in the NLP •Validate our output with local knowledge •Add geographic data where it is lacking (e.g. field names) • Identify crossovers with users of other sources (e.g. VCH) • Enrich our point data with raster and string data • More about sourcing communities than crowds
  13. 13. New project! • AHRC-funded scoping study under Connected Communities • Feb-November 2012 • Research crowd-sourcing models for the humanities • 2 expert seminars • Develop a typology of crowd-sourcing methods • Report/roadmapstuart.dunn@kcl.ac.uk mark.hedges@kcl.ac.uk

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