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KHADI

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KHADI

  1. 1. SUBMITTED BY: JITENDRA PATHAK(08) SHAMBHAVI MOHAN(20)
  2. 2. KHADI  KHADI is an Indian fabric. Khadi is also known by another name “Khaddar”. It is made by spinning the threads on an instrument known as “Charkha”  KHADI is a hand woven cloth using hand spun yarn containing natural fibers like cotton, silk and wool only, spun and woven in natural environment.  Mahatma Gandhi it as a symbol for political agendas during the fight for independence in India against the British rule. It was primarily a means to provide employment to the unemployed rural population of India at that time
  3. 3. KHADI AND VILLAGE INDUSTRIES COMMISSION (KVIC)  Khadi & Village Industries Commission (KVIC) established under the Khadi and Village Industries Commission Act, 1956  The functions of the Commission is to plan, promote, organize and assist in the establishment and development of khadi and village industries in the rural area in coordination with other agencies engaged in rural development wherever necessary.
  4. 4. MAIN OBJECTIVES OF KVIC oThe social objective of providing employment opportunities in the rural areas oThe economic objective of producing salable articles oThe wider objective of creating self- reliance amongst people and building up a strong rural community.
  5. 5. TYPE OF KHADI FABRICS Cotton khadi Poly khadi khadi wool Khadi muslin Khadi silk
  6. 6. GHANDHI JI AND KHADI  Promoted the spinning of khadi.  Rural employment.  Self reliance.  A weapon for defense against Britishers.  The first true Indian designers’ fabric.  He lead from the front and promoted this fabric of freedom.
  7. 7. PROCESS OF MAKING KHADI 1.Hand picking of the cotton 2.Ginning 3.Opening and cleaning 4.Carding 5.Drawing and combing 6.Roving 7.Spinning 8.Sizing 9.Wraping 10.Drawing and drafting 11.Weaving 12.Finishing
  8. 8. KHADI AND FASHION  These days Khadi has become a brand name and under the name of this brand many other products is being launched some of the products are:  Woolen Products  Hospital Linen  Leather Products  Organic Manure  Handmade Paper and products .
  9. 9. .  Khadi is the only fabric which is said to be “eco friendly” and hence increases its extent in fashion world.  Khadi today represents an exquisite, heritage product, which is ‘ethnic’ as well as ‘ethical’.  Khadi totally handcrafted and containing natural fibres, this natural flavour offers ample scope for fashion statement for the creative expression of fashion designers
  10. 10. GARMENTS MADE OF KHADI Madras checks on cotton fabric
  11. 11. FASHION DESIGNERS USING “KHADI” IN THEIR COLLECTION  DAVID ABRAHAM  BESS NIELSEN  CHRISTINA KIM  RITU KUMAR  SABYASACHI MUKHERJEE Ritu Kumar David Abraham Sabyasachi
  12. 12. Sabyasachi’s collection Ritu Kumar's show Bess Nielsen Kim's collection Bess Nielsen's collection David Abraham's collection Christina Kim
  13. 13. REVIVING KHADI IN INDIA (CORPORATE RESTRUCTURE) To display Khadi's potential, KVIC organized a fashion show in Mumbai in 1989. Nearly 85 dazzling garments created by Devika Bhojwani were presented at the show. This was the first step towards changing Khadi's earlier image of being unfashionable.
  14. 14. •In 1990, the Delhi based designer, Ritu Kumar presented her first Khadi collection, Tree of Life, which helped put Khadi in the fashion circuit. With increasing interest of the western world in use of handloom and Khadi, many Indian designers began to use Khadi for their designs. • In September 2000, Vasundhara Raje, Minister for Small Scale Industries, initiated a movement to revive all the 7,000 KVIC shops in India and make Khadi more fashionable and affordable. The KVIC Board hired the services of leading fashion designers to help create a new range and brand of Khadi wear
  15. 15. State-wise annual sale of khadi (Rs crore) Srl.no state 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 1 Jammu& Kashmir 16.5 14.52 11.17 11.82 2 Himachal Pradesh 8.47 8.75 9.61 10.02 3 Punjab 12.85 10.18 8.15 8.55 4 UT Chandigarh 1.32 1.34 1.34 1.95 5 Uttarakhand 24.79 26.85 30.13 31.64 6 Haryana 39.99 76.28 84.81 89.69 7 Delhi 23.57 25.08 25.72 26.87
  16. 16. 8 Rajasthan 51.57 57.41 59.08 62.16 9 Uttar Pradesh 278.41 283.41 274.61 288.69 10 Bihar 13.23 16.37 17.16 17.85 11 Sikkim 0.01 0.1 0.1 0.11 12 Arunachal Pradesh 0.17 0.26 0.24 0.25 13 Nagaland 0.83 0.96 0.96 1.01 14 Manipur 0.73 0.76 0.78 0.81
  17. 17. 15 Mizoram 0.04 0.07 0.07 0.07 16 Tripura 0.58 0.59 0.59 0.62 17 Meghalaya 0.06 0.08 0.09 0.09 18 Assam 7.4 7.94 8.39 8.86 19 West Bengal 28.18 35.31 47.92 50.56 20 Jharkhand 9.17 9.21 29.11 30.86 21 Odisha 2.9 2.92 4.16 4.35 22 Chhattisgarh 7.88 9.69 10.22 10.74
  18. 18. 23 Madhya Pradesh 19.04 12.7 13.29 14.06 24 Gujarat* 47.5 48.82 50.6 53.18 25 Maharashtra ** 14.04 14.08 13.26 13.91 26 Andhra Pradesh 11.45 12.96 14.21 14.97 27 Karnataka 42.64 44.5 32.59 34.48 28 Goa 0.53 0 0 0 29 Lakshadweep 0 0 0 0 30 Kerala 46.47 48 66.39 70.44 31 Tamilnadu 88.44 97.4 102.04 108.77 32 Puducherry 0.84 0.47 0.47 0.49 33 Andaman & Nicobar Islands 0 0 0 0 Total 799.6 867.01 917.26 967.87 * including Daman & Diu ** including Dadra & Nagar Haveli Note: The figures for 2012-13 are under compilation by KVIC.
  19. 19. MALKHA "Malkha fabrics are woven by skilled weaver families on handlooms in Indian villages from cotton grown by smallholder farmer families. Malkha combines thousands of years of Indian experience of cotton with modern Indian engineering skills
  20. 20. The MALKHA process puts the intermediate stage of cotton spinning back in the village, making the entire textile chain from cotton to cloth village-based. They handle the delicate cotton fibers gently, avoiding the force and violence of conventional processing, keeping the springiness of the live fibers all the way into the cloth. That’s what gives malkha fabric its swing & drape. Malkha fabric is soft, it breathes, absorbs, holds color, reflects its handmade heritage in its texture.
  21. 21. SPECIALTIES OF MALKHA  Malkha is pure cotton cloth made directly from raw cotton in the village close to cotton fields  Combines traditional Indian principles of cloth making with modern small-scale technology.  Energy efficient - avoids baling and unbaling of cotton by heavy machinery and unnecessary transport.  Malkha has a beautiful texture, is soft, and keeps its shape for ages.  The DCY* technology-decentralised cotton yarn technology which exploits the natural buoyancy of cotton
  22. 22. AMBAR CHARKHA-E CHARKHA  The e-charkha developed by KVIC in association with Flexitron, Bangalore enables a spinner, living in the hinterland of the country, to spin yarn and also generate enough power to light up her home and listen to transistor. Such e-charkha is available in all spindle-age i.e. single, 2 spindle and 8 spindle
  23. 23. AMBAR CHARKHA-E CHARKHA Features of e – charkha  The e-charkha is provided with a generator.  Spinning on the 2 spindle e-charkha just for 2 hours would give yarn of length 2.4 km (2.4 hanks) and a light output / back up for 7.5 hours, which is sufficient for one day use.  The generator can easily be connected to / disconnected from charging simply by flipping a switch to on / off mode.
  24. 24. .  Components of e – charkha  Spinning unit contain one / two / eight spindle charkha.  The lighting unit has the LED of 1 watt.  The transistor radio – normal AM/FM tuner.  Battery.  Spinning of e-charkha for only two hours a day would render the following benefits  Lighting of LED lamp and listening transistor continuously for 7 ½ hours.  Spinning on 2 spindle e-charkha for 25 days in a month will produce yarn sufficient for a single bed-sheet, a bath towel and a shirt.
  25. 25. S.W.O.T ANALYSIS OF "KHADI"  STRENGTH  Khadi has a very good drape and contains a great potential  Ecofriendy  Connects to freedom movement  Statement about your lifestyle and values/austere  WEAKNESS  Less awareness and preference to foreign brands  Lack of artisans  Lack of promotional activities  Lack of funds  Low wages for artisans
  26. 26. .  OPPORTUNITY  Only 4% of khadi is contributed in India’s annual fabric production so it can be increased with few efforts.  New technologies –like DCY technology and ambar charkha(e-charkha)  New markets  New products  THREAT  Preparation of Khadi is an expensive procedure which kills the scope of its popularity.  Online market  Intense competition
  27. 27. CONCLUSION What really works for Khadi is its texture.  Khadi works better generally in tunics and simpler shapes because of its fall and drape.  Khadi has breathability which works in its favour.  Khadi’s unique thermal effect lends warmth in winter and makes it a cool summer fabric.  Khadi is ecologically viable as it does not use harmful chemicals
  28. 28. REFERENCES .  http://www.realbuzz.com/articles/the-importance-of-khadi-to-runners-in-en/  http://www.active.com/gear/Articles/The_Science_Behind_khadi  http://www.bigskyfishing.com/snow-boots/winter-sock.shtm  http://journal.stylealphabet.com/the-importance-of-socks-for-men/  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5Z9NB3Q2EM  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uvL_KUq7Pg  http://www.renfroindia.com/  http://www.booruguindia.com/  http://www.gainup.in/  http://www.shuishan.com/en/z.asp  http://sansilou.gmc.globalmarket.com/products/details/sock-knitting-machine- 265850.html  http://www.fibre2fashion.com/eurowell/  http://www.malkha.in/index.html  BOOKS REFERRED  “KHADI-Fabric of freedom “ By AMR VASTRA KOSH  MATERIAL SCIENCE BY HAZRA CHAUDHARY  JOURNALS REFERRED  THE INDIAN TEXTILE JOURNAL  THE KVIC JOURNAL

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