Singapore Math Administrators Symposium, Chicago

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This national edition of the symposium was held in Chicago. This was Dr Yeap Ban Har's day-long presentation. Dr Duriya Aziz, Andy Clark, Dr Richard Bisk and Dr Steve Leinwand were among the other presenters.

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Singapore Math Administrators Symposium, Chicago

  1. 1. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Singapore Math Administrators Symposium<br /> Chicago  27 – 29 January 2011<br />Yeap Ban Har banhar@sg.marshallcavendish.com<br />www.marshallcavendish.com/education/mci<br />
  2. 2. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Session <br /> Mathematics as a Thinking Tool<br /> Importance of Initial Concrete Experiences<br /><ul><li>Emphasis on Conceptual Understanding</li></li></ul><li>mathematics<br />a thinking<br />tool<br />
  3. 3. Revision of the Curriculum <br />1992<br />2001<br />2007<br />2013<br />thinking<br />curriculum and standards<br />
  4. 4. TIMSS 2007<br />Trends in International Mathematics and Science Studies<br />Indonesia<br />Thailand<br />Malaysia<br />Singapore<br />International<br />Grade 8<br />Advanced<br />2<br />3<br />0<br />40<br />2<br />High<br />15<br />12<br />4<br />70<br />18<br />Intermediate<br />46<br />44<br />14<br />88<br />50<br />Low<br />75<br />66<br />48<br />97<br />82<br />Method Used in Singapore Textbooks<br />
  5. 5. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />A<br />C<br />B<br />In the diagram, ACEG and BDFH are squares. AB, CD, EF and GH are of the same length. The ratio of AB : BC is 2 : 1.<br />What fraction of square ACEG is shaded?<br />Grade 6 National Test Item <br />Singapore Examination and Assessment Board 2010<br />H<br />D<br />G<br />E<br />F<br />
  6. 6. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />A<br />C<br />B<br />H<br />D<br />G<br />E<br />F<br />
  7. 7. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />A<br />C<br />B<br /><br />H<br /><br />D<br />G<br />E<br />F<br />
  8. 8. concrete<br />introduction<br />
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  11. 11.   <br />“… in which at some simple level a set of ideas or operations were introduced in a rather intuitive way …” <br />Bruner 1975, p.3-4 <br />
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  24. 24. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  25. 25. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  28. 28. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  39. 39. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  42. 42. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Traditional Gift from Singapore ‘Five Stones’<br />
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  44. 44. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Session <br /> From Concrete to Pictorial<br />
  45. 45. emphasis <br />visualization<br />
  46. 46. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  47. 47. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  48. 48. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  55. 55. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  56. 56. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Session <br /><ul><li>Bar Model Method
  57. 57. Where Does It All Lead To?</li></li></ul><li>emphasis <br />visualization<br />
  58. 58. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  59. 59. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  60. 60. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Dolphin show<br />1235<br />275<br />Bird show<br />960 <br />1235 – 275 = ? <br />1235 – 235 – 40 = <br />960 <br />1235 + 960 = ? <br />2235 – 40 = 2235 – 35 – 5 = <br />2195 <br />2195 people attend both shows.<br />
  61. 61. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />2 units = $24<br />2 units = $24<br />1 unit = $12<br />The book costs $12.<br />
  62. 62. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
  63. 63. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />3 units = $24<br />3 units = $24<br />1 unit = $8<br />The book costs $16.<br />2 units = $16<br />
  64. 64. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />3 units = $24<br />1 unit = $8<br />4 units = $32<br />The book costs $32 ÷ 3 = $10.67.<br /> $24<br />
  65. 65. emphasis <br />variation<br />
  66. 66. emphasis <br />variation<br />
  67. 67. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Session <br /><ul><li>Variation, Not Repetition
  68. 68. Teach Less, Learn More</li></li></ul><li>Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  71. 71. emphasis <br />variation<br />connections<br />
  72. 72. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />
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  85. 85. How to make sure the butterfly cannot flyHow do you get a butterfly?First there is the egg which hatches into a caterpillar. The caterpillar eats and grows. At the right time, it makes a cocoon out of its own body. While in the cocoon, the caterpillar changes into a butterfly.When the butterfly is ready, it starts to break through the cocoon. First a hole appears. Then the butterfly struggles to come out through the hole. This can take a few hours.If you try to "help" the butterfly by cutting the cocoon, the butterfly will come out easily but it will never fly. Your "help" has destroyed the butterfly.The butterfly can fly because it has to struggle to come out. The pushing forces lots of enzymes from the body to the wing tips. This strengthens the muscles, and reduces the body weight. In this way, the butterfly will be able to fly the moment it comes out of the cocoon. Otherwise it will simply fall to the ground, crawl around with a swollen body and shrunken wings, and soon die.If the butterfly is not left to struggle to come out of the cocoon, it will never fly.We can learn an important lesson from the butterfly.If we do not have struggles and challenges in our work, we will never grow strong and capable. If life has no difficulties, we will become weak and helpless.Lim Siong GuanHead, Civil Service<br />
  86. 86. Experiencing <br />Singapore Math<br />Session <br /><ul><li>Current Developments </li></ul>in Mathematics Instruction in Singapore<br />
  87. 87. Revision of the Curriculum <br />1992<br />2001<br />2007<br />2013<br />thinking<br />curriculum and standards<br />
  88. 88. thinking<br />textbooks<br />
  89. 89. thinking<br />pedagogy<br />
  90. 90. PERI Report<br />2010<br />engagement<br />pedagogy<br />
  91. 91. engagement<br />pedagogy<br />
  92. 92. thinking<br />national test<br /> of a group of children are boys. <br /> of the boys and 210 girls chose to go on a school trip. <br /> of the children chose not to go on the school trip. <br />How many children chose to go on the school trip?<br /><br />210<br />960 children chose to go.<br />
  93. 93. technology<br />national test<br />A type of candy costs 40 cents each.<br />Find the largest number of candies that can be bought with $95.<br />$95 ÷ 40 cents = 367.5<br />The largest number of candies that can be bought is 367.<br />
  94. 94. struggling<br />learners<br />system-wide strategies<br />learning support programs<br />foundation programs<br />
  95. 95. lessonstudy<br />professional development<br />
  96. 96. Singapore Math Summer Institute<br />Worchester State University, MA      6-8 July 2011<br />where content meets pedagogy<br />DrYeap Ban Har Dr Richard Bisk  Several Other Singapore Presenters <br />Contact melissaooi@sg.marshallcavendish.com<br />

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