Presentation with donkey

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  • Taught through multiple exposures, word charts, vocabulary building, text talk, etc.
  • Context can be provided by pictures, words, sentences, and paragraphs that occur before and after the unknown word.
  • 1-general2-directive
  • NondirectiveMisdirective
  • 1. Prevaricated-telling half truths. 2. Wheedle-persuade with flattery. 3. Schmoozing-chatting. 4. Taciturn-quiet.
  • Presentation with donkey

    1. 1. Conventional Understanding Problem
    2. 2. Students read widely enough to encounter a considerable number of unfamiliar words. Students have the skills to infer word meaning information from the context.
    3. 3.  Both wide reading and explicit instruction help to build a new vocabulary. To be most effective, teachers should teach the most useful words (high utility words), and students should have the opportunity to apply their knowledge of these words in multiple subject areas and fictional texts. (Beck, Perfetti & McKewon, 1982; Beck, McKeown, & Kucan 2002.)
    4. 4.  Using context clues is a powerful tool for vocabulary building and is most valuable when used to learn the meanings of the most frequently occurring words.  Context can be provided by pictures, words, sentences, and paragraphs that occur before and after the unknown word.
    5. 5. (Beck et al., 2002)
    6. 6.  Misdirective Contexts ◦ Lead readers to incorrect meanings of words. After learning that held in his possession the winning ticket to multi -million dollar lottery, and realizing that all of his financial dreams would be achieved, Eric gazed at the ticket with melancholy eyes.
    7. 7.  Nondirective Contexts ◦ Do not direct the reader toward any precise meaning for a word. While laying in bed listening to the stillness of the night, she was quite relieved to hear the jake and to know he was finally home.
    8. 8.  General Contexts ◦ Provide adequate information for a reader to place a word in a general category. The elderly man noted that even though the temperature was in the single digits, the children repeatedly climbed the snow hills and slid down them on their bellies, laughing the whole time. Their ambition made him feel vivacious.
    9. 9.  Directive Contexts ◦ Are more likely to lead a reader to a specific, correct meaning for a word. Elation showed in the glowing face of the young toddler. After many attempts of standing up and falling down, she was finally able to balance herself and put one foot in front of the other. At last, she was walking!
    10. 10. 1. When chatting with his buddies about fishing, the fisherman prevaricated, stating that his fish weighed 11 pounds and was 36 inches long. 2. The young man was able to wheedle his grandmother into reading one more story before bed, by batting is long eyelashes and smiling a toothless grin.
    11. 11. 3. He does not know the difference between a strike or a spare—he just likes schmoozing at the bowling alley. 4. The taciturn pup in the litter of three wolf pups grew into the honorable position of alpha male.
    12. 12. 1. When chatting with his buddies about fishing, the fisherman prevaricated, stating that his fish weighed 11 pounds and was 36 inches long. Answer: General 2. The young man was able to wheedle his grandmother into reading one more story before bed, by batting is long eyelashes and smiling a toothless grin. Answer: Directive 3. He does not know the difference between a strike or a spare—he just likes schmoozing at the bowling alley. Answer: Nondirective 4. The taciturn pup in the litter of three wolf pups grew into the honorable position of alpha male. Answer: Misdirective
    13. 13. Misdirective Contexts lead readers to incorrect meanings of words. Nondirective Contexts Do not direct the reader toward any precise meaning for a word. General Contexts Provide adequate information for a reader to place a word in a general category. Directive Contexts Are more likely to lead a reader to a specific, correct meaning for a word.

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