The Convergence of IntelligentTransportation Systems and the Smart Grid:Communication Standards & The Dividends           ...
Why Communication Standards?      -The dividends of interoperability!• Receive revenue from electric vehicle charging stat...
How do you get there? Open Standards!Open Standards as opposed to Proprietary Standards, rely on a broadly consultative an...
Where Have Open Standards Been Employed?• Personal computers - no wiring DB9 connectors anymore, your webcam,         mous...
What common issue did all these industries face?      - A failure to communicate!Mechanical, electrical and software syste...
The 7 OSI LayersThe Open Systems Interconnection                                                                7(OSI) Mod...
The 7 OSI LayersLayers 4 through 7 are the Host Layers                                                                    ...
The 7 OSI LayersLayers 1 through 3 are the Media Layers                                                                  7...
To Assure Interoperability,       - All 7 OSI Layers Must Be Supported7                         US DOT NTCIP 1213         ...
The Open StandardsZigbee®• The ZigBee Alliance is a group of companies that maintain and publish the ZigBee standard.• Goo...
The Open Standards – NTCIP 1213 known as “ELMS”The United States Department of Transportation’s Intelligent Transportation...
The Open Standards – NTCIP 1213 known as “ELMS”• Approved by vote of full membership of:     - Institute of Transportation...
Communication Standards &The Dividends of Interoperability!• Features get created faster, at a lower cost• Hardware trends...
Communication Standards &The Dividends of Interoperability!Advocate open standards that address all 7 OSI layersIn return ...
Questions?                 Jim Frazer          1907 N Federal Hwy #106          Pompano Beach, FL 33064               954 ...
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The Convergence of Intelligent transportation Systems and The Smart Grid

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Presentation to the Department of Energy\'s Municipal Solid State Lighting Consortium, March 8 2011. Smart Grid, energy, transportation, lighting, roadway, safety, standards, interoperability, illumination, streetlight

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The Convergence of Intelligent transportation Systems and The Smart Grid

  1. 1. The Convergence of IntelligentTransportation Systems and the Smart Grid:Communication Standards & The Dividends of Interoperability Jim Frazer 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 4
  2. 2. Why Communication Standards? -The dividends of interoperability!• Receive revenue from electric vehicle charging stations - without crashing the network• Employ Adaptive Lighting by using data from other sub-systems - from vehicle counts, weather information, road reflectivity etc.• Allow competition within the streetlight control system - dont be held hostage by one vendor• Plug in NATIVELY to the Smart Grid, using Department of Energy standards• Prevent and diagnose dangerous ground faults• Ensure a fixed level of light output over the entire life of the fixture• Bid to buy and sell power in real-time on the open market• Future proof your system• Receive funding from the US DOE, and DOT through - the Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transportation Administration and other sources 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 5
  3. 3. How do you get there? Open Standards!Open Standards as opposed to Proprietary Standards, rely on a broadly consultative and inclusive groupincluding representatives from vendors, academicians and others holding a stake in the development.This group discusses and debates the technical and economic merits, demerits and feasibility of aproposed common protocol. After the doubts and reservations of all members are addressed, the resultingcommon document is endorsed as a common standard. This document is released to the public, becomingan open standard.It is published and is available freely to any and all comers, with no further encumbrances.Vendors and individuals (including those who were not part of the original group) can use the standardsdocument to make products that implement the common protocol defined in the standard, and are thusinteroperable by design, with no specific liability or advantage for any customer for choosing one productover another on the basis of standardized features.The vendors products compete on the quality of their implementation, user interface, ease of use,performance, price, and a host of other factors, while keeping the customers data intact and transferableeven if he or she chooses to switch to another competing product for business reasons. 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 6
  4. 4. Where Have Open Standards Been Employed?• Personal computers - no wiring DB9 connectors anymore, your webcam, mouse, keyboard just works• Building automation – in the 1980s all proprietary, now all plug and play• Mobile phone networks - cameras, GPS, Skype™ & related applications• The US Department of Transportation’s Intelligent Transportation System• The US Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Interoperability Program 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 7
  5. 5. What common issue did all these industries face? - A failure to communicate!Mechanical, electrical and software systems (both languages/profiles andunderlying media layers) could not seamlessly, transparently talk to each other.With intelligence and diligence these obstacles were overcome.Similarly we need to find a way to easily and reliably connect to everything fromthe vehicle counter at the traffic signal to the Smart GridHow did other industries accomplish this task? - Host application and media standards were developed 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 8
  6. 6. The 7 OSI LayersThe Open Systems Interconnection 7(OSI) Model was developed byInternational Organization for 6Standardization (ISO) in the 1980s asan attempt to make communication 5between any two systems possible. 4Before this, every equipmentmanufacturer implemented its own 3set of rules (protocols). Therefore, twocomputers made by different 2companies could not "understand"each other. 1 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 9
  7. 7. The 7 OSI LayersLayers 4 through 7 are the Host Layers 77) The Application Layer represents the interface between the end-user and the network. Applications reside here. 66) The Presentation Layer transforms data to make a general 5interface to the Application layer. It decodes, encodes andcompresses data for the upper layer. 45) The Session Layer includes the sessions between computers. It 3opens, maintains and terminates the connections 24) The Transport Layer provides data flow between computers; itrelieves the upper layers of the concern of getting and sending the 1data. 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 10
  8. 8. The 7 OSI LayersLayers 1 through 3 are the Media Layers 73) The Network Layer makes it possible to transport the databetween networks. The beginning of each message 6possesses a network header, which includes the address ofthe sender and of the recipient. The end of the message 5typically contains a checksum that confirms data integrity. 42) The Data Link Layer takes the bits from layer one andarranges them into data structures called frames 31) The Physical Layer defines the electrical part of the 2communication: the binary signals that aretransmitted and received in the data exchange. As you 1probably expected, the data packet looks something likethis: 110011000011001100. 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 11
  9. 9. To Assure Interoperability, - All 7 OSI Layers Must Be Supported7 US DOT NTCIP 1213 7 Other Electrical Lighting &6 Applications Management Systems 6 Standard5 54 LonWorks™ Technology 4 EIA & De facto Standard3 Other 3 Media2 Technologies ZigBee® Technology 21 1 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 12
  10. 10. The Open StandardsZigbee®• The ZigBee Alliance is a group of companies that maintain and publish the ZigBee standard.• Good for long distance low bandwidth applications• Widely supported• However no functional profiles under development for street lighting, circuit breakers,ground fault sensors etc.• Thus no applications have been built upon these non-existent functional profiles.• Zigbee devices from different manufacturers do not work together.• OSI Layers 1 - 3LonWorks™ Technology• A control networking platform built for networking devices over media such as twisted pair,power lines, fiber optics.• Limited use in US for utility streetlight applications due to power line communications only• Good for circuit based streetlight controls with many luminaires per circuit• ANSI standard for control networking (ANSI/CEA-709.1-B)• OSI Layers 1 – 3 and beyond 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 13
  11. 11. The Open Standards – NTCIP 1213 known as “ELMS”The United States Department of Transportation’s Intelligent Transportation System(ITS) Standard for Electrical Lighting and Management Systems (ELMS)• Addresses remote control and monitoring of all the electrical assets in the publicright of way, including lighting, metering, and safety equipment i.e. ground faultdetection• The result of a very broad consultative and inclusive group including representativesfrom vendors, academicians and others holding a stake in the development.• Joins 20+ Other ITS standards, including -ITS Vehicle counters, traffic signals, toll booth, cameras, dynamic message signs, rain, snow and road reflectivity sensors.• Allows for plug & play development of cross system applications like adaptivelighting, and power buy/sell agreements• Allows for plug & play of various internal parts of a streetlight system, includingground fault detectors, meters, metering streetlight controllers 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 14
  12. 12. The Open Standards – NTCIP 1213 known as “ELMS”• Approved by vote of full membership of: - Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), - National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) - The American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO)• Referenced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology as a Departmentof Energy Smart Grid Interoperability Standard• Continued significant Federal funding available from - US Department of Transportation - US Department of Energy• Pending Bills in Washington DC include a focus -on ITS in general and -ELMS in particular• Significant ELMS initiatives underway within -The Illuminating Engineering Society - The International Municipal Signal Association• Supports OSI Layers 4 – 7• Media independent 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 15
  13. 13. Communication Standards &The Dividends of Interoperability!• Features get created faster, at a lower cost• Hardware trends to commodity status faster• Federal funding offsets capital cost• Allowing you to easily install innovative applications with extremelyattractive paybacks 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 16
  14. 14. Communication Standards &The Dividends of Interoperability!Advocate open standards that address all 7 OSI layersIn return you’ll receive• Features that get created faster, at a lower cost• Hardware trending to commodity status faster• Federal funding to offset capital cost• The ability to easily create and install innovative systems and applications with extremely attractive paybacks 2011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 17
  15. 15. Questions? Jim Frazer 1907 N Federal Hwy #106 Pompano Beach, FL 33064 954 309 95142011 Central Region Workshop – Kansas City, MO 18

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