The Future is Here
Next Level Global Education and Social
Studies Design Workshop
Teaching in a Time of Transition, World
...
General Bernard
Schriever
Feb. 19, 1957
Inaugural Air Force Office of
Scientific Research
Astronautics Symposium in
San Di...
“The path of technological innovation is knowable at least
several decades in advance of the future. It is simply not
true...
STEM Knowledge Mergers
Skill Mergers
?
http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Earth-View-From-The-Moon.jpg
July 20, 1969
May 25, 2008
Phoenix Mars Probe
ROBOTS
Forces of Change
Transformation of Technology
Globalization of Economy
Changing Demography
New Value System
and Structure of:
Knowledge
Organizations
Industries
Markets
Technical Systems
Human Capital
Curricula
The Commission reported:
1. There was a widespread interest in the subject of industrial education.
2. The lack of skilled...
On June 7, 1905, Massachusetts Governor William Douglas appointed a
Commission on Industrial and Technical Education that ...
Agrarian Age
Input to production
– human labor
Industrial Age
Input to production –
machine labor
American Industrial Revo...
Sun
Orbits
Earth
Earth
Orbits
Sun
Transition
Paradigm Shift
Change
From
To
Paradigm Shift
Transition
Change
Agrarian Age
Input to production
– human labor
Industrial Age
What changed with regard to
education, identity, gender
role...
Morrill Act, July 2, 1862
Practical
Arts
Liberal
Arts
S&T
Motivates
New
Ed
“...promote the liberal and practical education...
Hail the skillful
cunning hand!
Hail to the
cultural mind!
Contending for
the world’s
command,
Here let them
be combined.
...
Activity #1
Transitions &
Changes
Activity #2
Transitions &
Changes
Structure of
Technology
What do you
think of
when I say?
Robot
John Hart / AP
http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
29
Lost in Space
Control Robot
The Day the Earth Stood Still - Gort
We need to think
beyond these.
v
v
Robots are now
fundamental to how
we live, work, and play
in the 21st century.
36
37
Origo may be the last
toy you ever have to
buy for your child. The
prototype 3D printer
under development by
Artur Tcho...
38
http://img9.joyreactor.com/pics/post/gif-cats-iRobot-vacuum-cleaner-278519.gif
3939
http://www.gadgetspage.com/wp-content/uploads/inside-redbox.jpg
DEFINE
ROBOT
http://perfectpollypet.com/
Robots are now
part of the fabric
of 21st
century
life, work and
play.
Home Technology
http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1-
wp_02_1280_1024.jpg
http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/a...
Your car is a robot.
TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
Software Computer
ElectricalActuator
ROBOT
Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-473040/The-car-stops-drink-driving.html
Computer
Communication and
Control of Information
Cyber
Physical
Computing
Communication and
Control of Physical
Processes...
http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDus
Berkeley’s Golem Dust
11.7 mm3 total circumscribed ...
GlucoboyThe video game that runs on blood.
“Dentist and
engineer
partner in
Israel.”
MIT Technology Review, January, 2005
New H2M
Relations
p://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf
el-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp
rkeley.intel-research.net/paul...
Control a
pan/tilt/zoom
camera and a
firearm to shoot at
real targets in real
time.
Currently, shooters
will be able to fi...
charmedlabs.com
Machine Actors
“Robots at same
stage as 1978 PCs.”
--Baylor University,
Carbonara and Korpi
New
M2M
(Harbor Research, 2003)
(Harbor Research, 2003)
1994 - 2004
(Harbor Research, 2003)
(Harbor Research, 2003)
2004 - 2014
Source: Harbor
Research, 2003Industries
http://www.heartonline.org/images/defibrillator1.jpg
A Pacemaker the Size
of a Tic Tac -
Medtronic is using
microelectronics to
make a pacemaker so
small it can be
injected. T...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/20950196/PaceMaker-HAcking#
Cyberspace has
recently been
characterized as
a domain of
bullying, crime,
warfare,
terrorism and civil
development.
July ...
Sea Land
SpaceAir
Cyberspace
Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
AIR
CELL PHONE BOMB
http://www.weblogsinc.com/common/images/2522954530774841.JPG?0.7474910150383662
LAND
SEA – OCEAN IT
Skill Mergers
?
Space
Social Cognitive
ArtificialNatural
5th World
Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/
http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
NANO
Design of things.
Mixed Reality
Imagine the
games we can
play…
Star Wars TIE FIGHTER for I-Phone
Social
Cognitive
Learning
& Behavior
VirtualPhysical
Private
5th World
Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
The first time in
history our toys
are also our
weapons.
Electronics Actuator
SoftwareComputer
Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
Knowledge
Innovation
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20927943.800-smart-contact-lenses-for-health-and-headup-displays.html
Babak Parviz a...
A living, breathing lung-on-a-chip has been
developed. As well as mimicking the cellular structure
of the lung, the chip c...
MIT Tech Review, 2005
Sensors
Physical
Chemical
Biological
http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16
Act...
Information Society
1973-2003
1973
Post
Industrial Age
Input to production
– knowledge,
technology, and
information
Indust...
Similar to space in 1957, cyberspace is
now the the platform and engine of
education, workforce, economic
development, and...
Cyber Physical Society
2003 - X
2003
Age of
Robotics
Input to production
– artificial labor,
intelligence, and
design
Post...
Activity #3
Ideal State
The Bellwether Sounds - The Role of
CTE in S.T.E.M. Education, by Jim
Brazell, Consulting Analyst, The
Schriever Institute...
Activity
Using the blossom
method, please identify
the key characteristics
of student learning and
teaching excellence in
...
Activity #4
Be the change
Everyone is a scribe on this one…
Activity #5
Failure
Classical
Contemporary
Education
“There are kids on Maui
who have never been to
the top of the mountain or
to Hana much less have
they traveled off of the
...
TEAMS
“Ahupua’a”
The Whole, not a part but
how all parts are connected.
http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
TEAMS
“Ho’ohanalima”
Learning by doing
.
Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Fishpond
located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
Waipulani Longitudinal
Algae Research
Project – Kihei Charter
School
Makena Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle Fibropapiloma Virus Study– Kihei Charter
School
Applied
Problem
Solving
World
Knowledge
The key literacy of the 21st
century is
transdiscipline.
Transdiscipline
Transdiscipline is the organization of
people across institutional silos to
innovate. Innovation is the cr...
http://www.olin.edu/
http://www.olin.edu/
http://www.olin.edu/
http://www.olin.edu/
The key to Project-based Learning is learner
engagement in the public sphere. The learning theory
flows from Piaget’s cons...
Health
Arts
CTE
Academics
Leadership
Character
Citizenship
How do we cultivate
innovation and innovators?
Los Alto Academy of Engineering
1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
http://www.dentonrc.com/sharedcontent/utilities/clickedimage/index.html
Cyber Patriot
uscyberpatriot.org
http://www.mysanantonio.com/default/article/Students-hoping-to-ridethe-cybersecurity-wave...
Health
Arts
CTE
Academics
Leadership
Character
Citizenship
Classical Contemporary
Education
TE(a)MS Model Schools
Classical Contemporary Education
• High degree of faculty interaction across disciplines
and grades ...
Activity #6
Revolution
The end…
Or is it the beginning?
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.

1,790 views

Published on

The Future is Here: Next Level Global Education and Social Studies Design Workshop, June 24-28. 2013. STEM+Humanities: A workshop for Teaching in a Time of Transition, World Affairs Council, Summer Institute on International Affairs, June 24-28. 2013.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,790
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
84
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Defense Secretary Charles Wilson
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8 October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born » Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building. http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian ’ s launch Sputnik Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Apollo 11 was the spaceflight which landed the first humans, Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, on Earth's Moon on July 20, 1969, The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images) The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images) The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images) The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images). The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8 October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born » Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building. http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian ’ s launch Sputnik Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of re gulator y feed back. T he ter m c yber neti cs stems fro m the Gr eek kybe rnetes ( meaning st eersm an, governor, pilot, or rudd er). Cybernet ics i s the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal , one of the pioneers of cybernetics in th e 19 30s , conside rs cybe rnet ics a s "the ar t of assuring ef fic iency of action" (see external links for referen ce).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback . The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal , one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s , considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of re gulator y feed back. T he term c yberneti cs stems fro m the Gr eek kybernetes (meaning st eersm an, governor, pilot, or rudd er). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal , one of the pioneers of cybernetics in th e 19 30s , conside rs cybernetics a s "the art of assuring effic iency of action" (see external links for referen ce).
  • On September 6, 1880, the St. Louis Manual Training School of Washington University opened. Calvin Woodward, the director of the school, inscribed the following aspirations for the new venture in American education: The new school did not tear down the essential parts of the old but merely added a new method of developing ideas based on procedural instruction in the use of tools and the construction of models to demonstrate scientific principles and artistic craftsmanship. Woodward was careful in stating that the Manual School was not a manual labor school, or an industrial school, or a trade school: The school was designed to connect the new pathways leading to the cultured mind and the skillful hand. Manual training was not without its critics: Technical education was called a deceptive farce by zealous guardians of the liberal education who c onsidered it a threat to the intellect and unacceptable in public schools.
  • Mutton Busting
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of re gulator y feed back. T he term c yberneti cs stems fro m the Gr eek kybernetes (meaning st eersm an, governor, pilot, or rudd er). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal , one of the pioneers of cybernetics in th e 19 30s , conside rs cybernetics a s "the art of assuring effic iency of action" (see external links for referen ce).
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology: Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars Internal spacecraft monitoring Land/space comm. networks Chemical/biological sensors Weapons stockpile monitoring Defense-related sensor networks Inventory Control Product quality monitoring Smart office spaces Sports - sailing, balls For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above). Brief description of the operation of the mote: The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote. Longer description of the operation of the mote: The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again. Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn't see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes.
  • Anti depressant, AIDS and Parkinsons dry mouth effects speech and sleepDentist and engineer
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “ pervasive computing ” , “ hidden computing ” , “ invisible computing ” and “ ubiquitous computing . ” Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or… An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing. As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device. A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data. Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects.   Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer ’ s skin. “ The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal, ” says Paulos. “ This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues. ” For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device. And for those times when good vibes just aren ’ t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze. Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “ muscle wire ” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape. For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “ Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You ’ d probably feel really annoyed, ” says Paulos. “ It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you ’ re on the receiving end of a lovers ’ quarrel. ” “ Yea, ” says Paulos, “ there is an eerie side to this device. I don ’ t think anyone want to know what spam feels like. ”
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later. A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011 BY EMILY SINGER E-mail | Audio »|Print Medtron ic, t he world's largest medical-device maker, is using microelectronics and chip manufacturing to shrink pacemakers—implanted devices that regulate the heart's rhythm. Whereas current pacemakers are about as big as a silver dollar, Medtronic's device would be smaller than a tic tac. At that size, the device would be small enough to be inserted via catheter, rather than invasive surgery. The device is still a research instrument, says  Stephen Oesterle , Medtronic's seni or vice president for medicine and technology, but it could be on the market in five years. So far, Medtronic has developed most of the components—a circuit board, an oscillator to generate current, a capacitor to store and rapidly dispense charge, memory to store data, and a telemetry system to wirelessly transfer that data. The company has used chip manufacturing technology to assemble these components onto a wafer. Oesterle estimates that 60 to 70 pacemakers can be made from a single six-inch wafer, which the company creates at its own wafer fabrication plant in Arizona. "What we don't have that is fundamental to a pacemaker is a way to power the chip," says Oesterle. The company is working with startups that make thin-film batteries and other innovative power sources, though Oesterle declined to give further details. Medtronic's current-generation device houses all of the components in a small case implanted under the clavicle. Jolts of electricity are delivered to the heart via intercardiac leads. Eliminating the need for leads, which Oesterle calls "invasive and inefficient," is one of the major motivators in shrinking the device. Impedance between the wires and biological tissue ups the power requirement for the device. And the leads can cause complications if they fail. "You are stuck with either putting in new leads, which takes up space in the vein, or you can pull the leads out, which can risk tearing the heart or blood vessels," says  Emile Georges Daoud , a physician a nd professor of car diovascular medicine at Ohio State University. A system small enough to be placed exactly where the electricity is needed would eliminate these issues. "If you have the pacing element at the area you want to pace, it doesn't take much power," says Oesterle. "All you need to do is stimulate one cell in the heart and create a wave of depolarization." A smaller device would also be much easier to implant than existing versions. Scientists envision delivering it via the same procedure used in cardiac catheterization, in which a doctor inserts a thin plastic tube into an artery or vein, threading the tube all the way to the heart. The procedure is less invasive than surgical implantation, and more physicians are capable of doing it. "You can almost shoot these things in like bullets," says Oesterle.
  • The first portable pacemakers were about the size of a small paperback book. Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later. (Photo Courtesy of Medtronic)
  • “ For at least the past six years the US Department of Defense, nuclear laboratory sites and other sensitive US civilian government sites have been deeply penetrated, multiple times, by other nation states.
  • Lung-on-a-chip points to alternative to animal tests 19:00 24 June 2010 by Duncan Graham-Rowe A living, breathing lung-on-a-chip has been developed that can mimic the boundary between the lung's air sacs and its capillaries. It's at this boundary that inhaled pathogens and potentially harmful nanoparticles pass into the bloodstream. Reproducing those processes on a chip could one day provide an alternative to animal testing for drug development and toxicity screening. The coin-sized lung-on-a-chip consists of a simple network of microfluidic channels etched into a rubbery, transparent polymer called polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The central channel contains two layers of human cells, separated by a porous membrane (see image). In the upper layer the cells come from alveoli, the cavities deep inside the lung where gases pass between the lungs and the bloodstream. The lower layer contains endothelium cells from the capillaries that carry oxygen-rich blood away. Breathe in… As well as mimicking the cellular structure of the lung, the chip copies its behaviour too: it can "breathe". As air pressure in two channels flanking the main channel is periodically reduced and increased, the central membrane is widened, stretching the cells as it does to, before they contract once more as the pressure is increased, says Donald Ingber , director of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, and leader of the lung-on-a-chip team. Because the device is transparent, it's possible to make real-time measurements of the inflammatory response that occurs when pathogens or silica nanoparticles are introduced into the airflow chamber. The measurements are made using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. The extent to which these particles pass into the simulated bloodstream can also be recorded, Ingber says. These measurements show that the "breathing" mechanism appears to encourage the uptake of silica nanoparticles – a result that the team found also occurs when they introduced the same nanoparticles into a mouse lung connected to a ventilator. Lifelike response The fact that the lung-on-a-chip behaves so much like the real mouse lung is an encouraging sign that ethically acceptable and cheaper alternatives to animal testing may be on the way. Cell-culture techniques, which are also being investigated as an option, cannot take into account important mechanical influences that help regulate the organs, such as the stretching of lung tissue caused by breathing. "This is something that has been missing from almost all in vitro models," Ingber says. Anthony Holmes, of the UK National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research in London, agrees. "There's lot of evidence that the normal functions of organs require certain physical stimulations," he says. The lungs are one example but it applies equally to bone, cartilage and other tissues. "It's a nice model and an interesting approach." "It's wonderful that it breathes, and definitely a step in the right direction," says Kelly BéruBé , a cell biologist at Cardiff University, UK, who acts as scientific adviser to the UK's Safer Medicines Trust . But she warns that the immortalised cell lines used in the lung-on-a-chip tend not to have the same properties as "primary" cells taken from patients. "Unless they can get primary cells, they are not going to be able to replace animal tests." Journal reference: Science , DOI: 10.1126/science.1188302
  • By information I mean data processing in the broadest sense; the storage, retrieval, and processing of data becomes the essential resource for all economic and social exchanges... By knowledge, I mean an organized set of statements of facts or ideas, presenting a reasoned judgment or an experimental result, which is transmitted to others through some communication medium in some systematic form. - Daniel Bell (1979) Daniel Bell is perhaps the most famous sociologist of our time. He put forth the concept of a post-industrial society or information age in his book The Coming of Post-Industrial Society (1973). Later, he re-named this concept the information society, for which he is generally considered as the creator of the term (1979). By an information society, Bell means that we move from a producer of goods (manufacturing) to service economy and that theoretical knowledge, technology, and information become the major mode of commodity. Information, and those who know how to create, assemble, and disperse, are more valued than labor. Information is normally costly to produce , but cheap to reproduce . That is, the cost of producing the first copy of an information good (such as writing a book or recording a CD) is normally quite costly, but reproducing those goods is often negligible. In The Coming of Post Industrial Society , he wrote that we need to learn how to predict the future, rather than to forecast it in order to raise the number of possibilities so as to the directions in which society should be changing. In the coming century, the emergence of a new social framework of telecommunications may be decisive for the way in which economic and social exchanges are conducted, the way knowledge is created and retrieved, and the character of the occupations and work in which men engage. - Daniel Bell in The Social Framework of the Information Society 1980.
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8 October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born » Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building. http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/ LG SPUT IMAGE « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian ’ s launch Sputnik Ads by GoogleSputnik Huge selection, great deals on Sputnik items. Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth On Your Desktop. Free Download! www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet ’ s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik. Wikipedia says: “ Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was. ” Quotes: “ Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder. The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There ’ s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that ’ s what happened. ” - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138). ___________________ www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm U-2 Product SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur TOP of LAUNCH IMAGE Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration. Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000. _____________ Apollo 17 http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html Apollo 17 _ 1 http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg Apollo 17 _ 2 Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972: http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm Mars http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif Moon http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg Kennedy http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif November 21, 1963 Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm SPACE TEAMS MCD KANE Toursit Russian http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814 U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10. The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday. Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange. In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV) ___________ Tito http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E MIR http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY HAWKING http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source: No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release. Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA) Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11 Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party. From the Go Zero G Website: The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable. Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13. Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/history_knowledge/bell.html By information I mean data processing in the broadest sense; the storage, retrieval, and processing of data becomes the essential resource for all economic and social exchanges... By knowledge, I mean an organized set of statements of facts or ideas, presenting a reasoned judgment or an experimental result, which is transmitted to others through some communication medium in some systematic form. - Daniel Bell (1979) Daniel Bell is perhaps the most famous sociologist of our time. He put forth the concept of a post-industrial society or information age in his book The Coming of Post-Industrial Society (1973). Later, he re-named this concept the information society, for which he is generally considered as the creator of the term (1979). By an information society, Bell means that we move from a producer of goods (manufacturing) to service economy and that theoretical knowledge, technology, and information become the major mode of commodity. Information, and those who know how to create, assemble, and disperse, are more valued than labor. Information is normally costly to produce , but cheap to reproduce . That is, the cost of producing the first copy of an information good (such as writing a book or recording a CD) is normally quite costly, but reproducing those goods is often negligible. In The Coming of Post Industrial Society , he wrote that we need to learn how to predict the future, rather than to forecast it in order to raise the number of possibilities so as to the directions in which society should be changing. In the coming century, the emergence of a new social framework of telecommunications may be decisive for the way in which economic and social exchanges are conducted, the way knowledge is created and retrieved, and the character of the occupations and work in which men engage. - Daniel Bell in The Social Framework of the Information Society 1980.
  • How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “ create ” the “ civilizing effect? ” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam “ What are the essential questions ” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam/Tanik How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “ relevant cultural and social value factors ” in the next generation? Kozmetsky What is the “ learning[-life] experience ” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik How will we achieve the “ civilizing effect ” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • 200 studenst involved
  • 2013, Cyber Social Studies, Next Level Global Education, & STEM+Humanities by Jim Brazell.

    1. 1. The Future is Here Next Level Global Education and Social Studies Design Workshop Teaching in a Time of Transition, World Affairs Council, Summer Institute on International Affairs, June 24-28. 2013 Jim Brazell jimbrazell@ventureramp.com
    2. 2. General Bernard Schriever Feb. 19, 1957 Inaugural Air Force Office of Scientific Research Astronautics Symposium in San Diego. Commander of Western Development Division Headquarters Charles Wilson
    3. 3. “The path of technological innovation is knowable at least several decades in advance of the future. It is simply not true that we can not determine the structure, path and strategy of technology for planning and operations. All we have to do is lift our eyes up from the ground to look over the horizon.” October 23, 2010
    4. 4. STEM Knowledge Mergers Skill Mergers ?
    5. 5. http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Earth-View-From-The-Moon.jpg July 20, 1969
    6. 6. May 25, 2008 Phoenix Mars Probe
    7. 7. ROBOTS
    8. 8. Forces of Change Transformation of Technology Globalization of Economy Changing Demography
    9. 9. New Value System and Structure of: Knowledge Organizations Industries Markets Technical Systems Human Capital Curricula
    10. 10. The Commission reported: 1. There was a widespread interest in the subject of industrial education. 2. The lack of skilled workmen was not chiefly a want of manual dexterity but a want of what what may be called industrial intelligence. 3. There was a growing feeling of inadequacy of the existing public school system to fully meet the needs of modern industrial and social conditions. The schools were too exclusively literary in their spirit, scope, and methods. 4. To the question of who should bear the expense of technical education, the common answer was the state.
    11. 11. On June 7, 1905, Massachusetts Governor William Douglas appointed a Commission on Industrial and Technical Education that later became known as the Douglas Commission. The Commission reported: 1. There was a widespread interest in the subject of industrial education. 2. The lack of skilled workmen was not chiefly a want of manual dexterity but a want of what what may be called industrial intelligence. 3. There was a growing feeling of inadequacy of the existing public school system to fully meet the needs of modern industrial and social conditions. The schools were too exclusively literary in their spirit, scope, and methods. 4. To the question of who should bear the expense of technical education, the common answer was the state. (Barlow, 2001 Years of Education 1776-1976, Feb. 1976) Vocational Education, 1826-1917
    12. 12. Agrarian Age Input to production – human labor Industrial Age Input to production – machine labor American Industrial Revolution 1812-1973 1812
    13. 13. Sun Orbits Earth Earth Orbits Sun Transition Paradigm Shift Change
    14. 14. From To Paradigm Shift Transition Change
    15. 15. Agrarian Age Input to production – human labor Industrial Age What changed with regard to education, identity, gender roles, society, politics, history, economics, ecology, religion, geography, anthropology, and civil society? What changed in the shift from agrarianism to industrialism? 1812-1973 1812
    16. 16. Morrill Act, July 2, 1862 Practical Arts Liberal Arts S&T Motivates New Ed “...promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes.” (Barlow, 2001 Years of Education 1776-1976, Feb. 1976)
    17. 17. Hail the skillful cunning hand! Hail to the cultural mind! Contending for the world’s command, Here let them be combined. (Barlow, 2001 Years of Education 1776-1976, Feb. 1976) St. Louis Manual Training School, 1880 Steam-driven threshing machine near Hallock, Minnesota. Photo from 1882, scanned from H. Arnold Barton, A Folk Divided: Homeland Swedes and Swedish Americans, 1840—1940, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 1994. Held by Nordiska Museet, Stockholm. Public domain by reason of age in Wikipedia.
    18. 18. Activity #1 Transitions & Changes
    19. 19. Activity #2 Transitions & Changes
    20. 20. Structure of Technology
    21. 21. What do you think of when I say?
    22. 22. Robot
    23. 23. John Hart / AP
    24. 24. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    25. 25. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    26. 26. 29
    27. 27. Lost in Space Control Robot
    28. 28. The Day the Earth Stood Still - Gort
    29. 29. We need to think beyond these. v v
    30. 30. Robots are now fundamental to how we live, work, and play in the 21st century.
    31. 31. 36
    32. 32. 37 Origo may be the last toy you ever have to buy for your child. The prototype 3D printer under development by Artur Tchoukanov and Joris Peels allows children aged ten and up to design figurines and shapes on a computer, and then print them out to play with. Instead of buying your children more toys, let them make their own. Cost: $800.00 http://singularityhub.com/2011/10/12/origos-3d-printer-could-be-the-last-toy-your-ten-year-old-will-ever-need/
    33. 33. 38 http://img9.joyreactor.com/pics/post/gif-cats-iRobot-vacuum-cleaner-278519.gif
    34. 34. 3939 http://www.gadgetspage.com/wp-content/uploads/inside-redbox.jpg
    35. 35. DEFINE ROBOT http://perfectpollypet.com/
    36. 36. Robots are now part of the fabric of 21st century life, work and play.
    37. 37. Home Technology
    38. 38. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1- wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp • 1,000th of a second sensor measures gap between heel and a magnet • 20-MHz microcontroller measures changes in compression • Motor spins at 4000 rpm turns a screw loosens cable • Environmentally and operator adaptive shoe sole
    39. 39. Your car is a robot. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
    40. 40. Software Computer ElectricalActuator ROBOT Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
    41. 41. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-473040/The-car-stops-drink-driving.html
    42. 42. Computer Communication and Control of Information Cyber Physical Computing Communication and Control of Physical Processes Computing Shift
    43. 43. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDus Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
    44. 44. GlucoboyThe video game that runs on blood.
    45. 45. “Dentist and engineer partner in Israel.” MIT Technology Review, January, 2005 New H2M Relations
    46. 46. p://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf el-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp rkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ Intel/Berkeley Connexus www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley Motes New H2H Relations
    47. 47. Control a pan/tilt/zoom camera and a firearm to shoot at real targets in real time. Currently, shooters will be able to fire 10 (ten) .22 caliber rounds at paper and silhouette targets. $5.95 for 10 shots and 20 minutes. New H2M2Enviro
    48. 48. charmedlabs.com Machine Actors “Robots at same stage as 1978 PCs.” --Baylor University, Carbonara and Korpi New M2M
    49. 49. (Harbor Research, 2003)
    50. 50. (Harbor Research, 2003) 1994 - 2004
    51. 51. (Harbor Research, 2003)
    52. 52. (Harbor Research, 2003) 2004 - 2014
    53. 53. Source: Harbor Research, 2003Industries
    54. 54. http://www.heartonline.org/images/defibrillator1.jpg
    55. 55. A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac - Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected. Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/32436/?nlid=4177
    56. 56. http://www.scribd.com/doc/20950196/PaceMaker-HAcking#
    57. 57. Cyberspace has recently been characterized as a domain of bullying, crime, warfare, terrorism and civil development. July 2010
    58. 58. Sea Land SpaceAir Cyberspace Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
    59. 59. AIR
    60. 60. CELL PHONE BOMB http://www.weblogsinc.com/common/images/2522954530774841.JPG?0.7474910150383662 LAND
    61. 61. SEA – OCEAN IT
    62. 62. Skill Mergers ? Space
    63. 63. Social Cognitive ArtificialNatural 5th World Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
    64. 64. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/
    65. 65. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    66. 66. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    67. 67. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    68. 68. NANO Design of things.
    69. 69. Mixed Reality
    70. 70. Imagine the games we can play…
    71. 71. Star Wars TIE FIGHTER for I-Phone
    72. 72. Social Cognitive Learning & Behavior VirtualPhysical Private 5th World Artificial design, intelligence, and labor.
    73. 73. The first time in history our toys are also our weapons.
    74. 74. Electronics Actuator SoftwareComputer Artificial design, intelligence, and labor. Knowledge Innovation
    75. 75. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20927943.800-smart-contact-lenses-for-health-and-headup-displays.html Babak Parviz at the University of Washington in Seattle created a prototype contact lens containing a single red LED. Using the same technology, he has now created a lens capable of monitoring glucose levels in people with diabetes.
    76. 76. A living, breathing lung-on-a-chip has been developed. As well as mimicking the cellular structure of the lung, the chip copies its behavior too: it can "breathe.“About the size of a rubber eraser, the device was developed by a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital Boston. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19085-lungonachip- points-to-alternative-to-animal-tests.html
    77. 77. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
    78. 78. Information Society 1973-2003 1973 Post Industrial Age Input to production – knowledge, technology, and information Industrial Age Input to production – machine labor
    79. 79. Similar to space in 1957, cyberspace is now the the platform and engine of education, workforce, economic development, and national security. Cyberspace is a domain of civil society, commerce, and governance while simultaneously representing an emerging domain of warfare, terrorism, and crime. The integration of computers, networks, software, and machines (cyber physical systems) has given birth to a new age.
    80. 80. Cyber Physical Society 2003 - X 2003 Age of Robotics Input to production – artificial labor, intelligence, and design Post Industrial Age Input to production – knowledge, technology, and information
    81. 81. Activity #3 Ideal State
    82. 82. The Bellwether Sounds - The Role of CTE in S.T.E.M. Education, by Jim Brazell, Consulting Analyst, The Schriever Institute, August 2008, Volume 1, Issue 2 When our predecessors stood at the edge of the world and gazed at Sputnik orbiting, they did not respond with a narrow focus on science and mathematics. The vanguard of military strategy-education, strategic weapons and technology forecasting-responded by advocating the expansion of military training, education, and learning to include unified classical and technical education. Brigadier Gen. Robert F. McDermott, the founding dean of the U.S. Air Force Academy was the first teacher to use a computer to teach astronauts space physics. A student of classical education from the K- 12 Latin School in Boston-to-Harvard, McDermott built the U.S. Air Force Academy programs on the integration of technical, scientific and mathematical education with classical studies such as philosophy, history, economics, and the arts. Gen. Bernard A. Schriever, who gave the famous “space speech” prior to the launch of the Sputnik, and Francis X. Kane of the U.S. Air Force supported McDermott’s pursuits. The last survivor, Kane, who is president of the Schriever Institute, continues to advocate the importance of both technical and academic learning in his speeches about Mars and the imperative for an American educational renaissance to support human development necessary for the mission. This renaissance, according to Kane, focuses on the integration of academic disciplines, the integration of thinking and doing in real world contexts, the integration of vocational and academic practice, and the integration of a global perspectives and languages into US curricula. Kane points out that competition is important; however, if there is to be hope for peace and prosperity-not to mention colonization of Mars- global collaboration will work hand-in-hand with technological innovation.
    83. 83. Activity Using the blossom method, please identify the key characteristics of student learning and teaching excellence in the 21st century.
    84. 84. Activity #4 Be the change Everyone is a scribe on this one…
    85. 85. Activity #5 Failure
    86. 86. Classical Contemporary Education
    87. 87. “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the mountain or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.” http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/
    88. 88. TEAMS “Ahupua’a” The Whole, not a part but how all parts are connected.
    89. 89. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    90. 90. TEAMS “Ho’ohanalima” Learning by doing
    91. 91. . Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Fishpond located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
    92. 92. Waipulani Longitudinal Algae Research Project – Kihei Charter School
    93. 93. Makena Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle Fibropapiloma Virus Study– Kihei Charter School
    94. 94. Applied Problem Solving World Knowledge The key literacy of the 21st century is transdiscipline.
    95. 95. Transdiscipline Transdiscipline is the organization of people across institutional silos to innovate. Innovation is the creation of transformative knowledge, tools, processes, and systems.
    96. 96. http://www.olin.edu/
    97. 97. http://www.olin.edu/
    98. 98. http://www.olin.edu/
    99. 99. http://www.olin.edu/
    100. 100. The key to Project-based Learning is learner engagement in the public sphere. The learning theory flows from Piaget’s constructivism (V word) and is extended by Papert’s Constructionism (N word): "Constructionism-the N word as opposed to the V word- shares contructivism's view of learning as "building knowledge structures "through progressive internalization of actions... It then adds the idea that this happens especially felicitously in a context where the learner is consciously engaged in constructing a public entity, whether it's a sand castle on the beach or a theory of the universe ( Papert, 1991, p.1 in Ackermann, n.d.)
    101. 101. Health Arts CTE Academics Leadership Character Citizenship How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    102. 102. Los Alto Academy of Engineering
    103. 103. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    104. 104. http://www.dentonrc.com/sharedcontent/utilities/clickedimage/index.html
    105. 105. Cyber Patriot uscyberpatriot.org http://www.mysanantonio.com/default/article/Students-hoping-to-ridethe-cybersecurity-wave-1043235.php#ixzz1IBe4Gqls
    106. 106. Health Arts CTE Academics Leadership Character Citizenship Classical Contemporary Education
    107. 107. TE(a)MS Model Schools Classical Contemporary Education • High degree of faculty interaction across disciplines and grades (systems) • Integrating CTE, Arts and Academics (systems) • Learning laboratories and worldly experience with industry-standard tools, processes and problems (systems) • Emerging P-20 systems (P-20) -- Sequenced, integrated and transferable courses HS to CTC to University (systems) • Transdisciplinary culture (systems) -- Context and frame for learning is real world, purpose driven and action oriented.
    108. 108. Activity #6 Revolution
    109. 109. The end… Or is it the beginning?

    ×