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  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • 200 studenst involved
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Design an architecture for the next generation of SES/SDPS and its relatinship to the world.“
    How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • Mutton Busting
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later.
    A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac
    Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected.
    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
    BY EMILY SINGER
    E-mail|Audio »|Print
    Medtronic, the world's largest medical-device maker, is using microelectronics and chip manufacturing to shrink pacemakers—implanted devices that regulate the heart's rhythm. Whereas current pacemakers are about as big as a silver dollar, Medtronic's device would be smaller than a tic tac. At that size, the device would be small enough to be inserted via catheter, rather than invasive surgery.
    The device is still a research instrument, says Stephen Oesterle, Medtronic's senior vice president for medicine and technology, but it could be on the market in five years.
    So far, Medtronic has developed most of the components—a circuit board, an oscillator to generate current, a capacitor to store and rapidly dispense charge, memory to store data, and a telemetry system to wirelessly transfer that data. The company has used chip manufacturing technology to assemble these components onto a wafer. Oesterle estimates that 60 to 70 pacemakers can be made from a single six-inch wafer, which the company creates at its own wafer fabrication plant in Arizona.
    "What we don't have that is fundamental to a pacemaker is a way to power the chip," says Oesterle. The company is working with startups that make thin-film batteries and other innovative power sources, though Oesterle declined to give further details.
    Medtronic's current-generation device houses all of the components in a small case implanted under the clavicle. Jolts of electricity are delivered to the heart via intercardiac leads. Eliminating the need for leads, which Oesterle calls "invasive and inefficient," is one of the major motivators in shrinking the device. Impedance between the wires and biological tissue ups the power requirement for the device. And the leads can cause complications if they fail. "You are stuck with either putting in new leads, which takes up space in the vein, or you can pull the leads out, which can risk tearing the heart or blood vessels," says Emile Georges Daoud, a physician and professor of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University.
    A system small enough to be placed exactly where the electricity is needed would eliminate these issues. "If you have the pacing element at the area you want to pace, it doesn't take much power," says Oesterle. "All you need to do is stimulate one cell in the heart and create a wave of depolarization."
    A smaller device would also be much easier to implant than existing versions. Scientists envision delivering it via the same procedure used in cardiac catheterization, in which a doctor inserts a thin plastic tube into an artery or vein, threading the tube all the way to the heart. The procedure is less invasive than surgical implantation, and more physicians are capable of doing it. "You can almost shoot these things in like bullets," says Oesterle.
  • Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later.
    A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac
    Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected.
    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011
    BY EMILY SINGER
    E-mail|Audio »|Print
    Medtronic, the world's largest medical-device maker, is using microelectronics and chip manufacturing to shrink pacemakers—implanted devices that regulate the heart's rhythm. Whereas current pacemakers are about as big as a silver dollar, Medtronic's device would be smaller than a tic tac. At that size, the device would be small enough to be inserted via catheter, rather than invasive surgery.
    The device is still a research instrument, says Stephen Oesterle, Medtronic's senior vice president for medicine and technology, but it could be on the market in five years.
    So far, Medtronic has developed most of the components—a circuit board, an oscillator to generate current, a capacitor to store and rapidly dispense charge, memory to store data, and a telemetry system to wirelessly transfer that data. The company has used chip manufacturing technology to assemble these components onto a wafer. Oesterle estimates that 60 to 70 pacemakers can be made from a single six-inch wafer, which the company creates at its own wafer fabrication plant in Arizona.
    "What we don't have that is fundamental to a pacemaker is a way to power the chip," says Oesterle. The company is working with startups that make thin-film batteries and other innovative power sources, though Oesterle declined to give further details.
    Medtronic's current-generation device houses all of the components in a small case implanted under the clavicle. Jolts of electricity are delivered to the heart via intercardiac leads. Eliminating the need for leads, which Oesterle calls "invasive and inefficient," is one of the major motivators in shrinking the device. Impedance between the wires and biological tissue ups the power requirement for the device. And the leads can cause complications if they fail. "You are stuck with either putting in new leads, which takes up space in the vein, or you can pull the leads out, which can risk tearing the heart or blood vessels," says Emile Georges Daoud, a physician and professor of cardiovascular medicine at Ohio State University.
    A system small enough to be placed exactly where the electricity is needed would eliminate these issues. "If you have the pacing element at the area you want to pace, it doesn't take much power," says Oesterle. "All you need to do is stimulate one cell in the heart and create a wave of depolarization."
    A smaller device would also be much easier to implant than existing versions. Scientists envision delivering it via the same procedure used in cardiac catheterization, in which a doctor inserts a thin plastic tube into an artery or vein, threading the tube all the way to the heart. The procedure is less invasive than surgical implantation, and more physicians are capable of doing it. "You can almost shoot these things in like bullets," says Oesterle.
  • The first portable pacemakers were about the size of a small paperback book. Within a year of their introduction to the market, researchers in Sweden developed the first implantable pacemaker. Medtronic licensed the first implantable pacemaker in the U.S. a few years later. (Photo Courtesy of Medtronic)
  • Parkinson's disease - Deep brain stimulation is most commonly used for treatment of Parkinson's disease     symptoms such as tremor, walking problems, stiffness and slowed movement.
    Essential tremor - A chronic condition that causes uncontrollable trembling of the voice or body part; the most common areas affected are the hands and arms. DSB is mainly used to control the tremor in the hand and arm.
    Dystonia - A neurological disorder characterized by repetitive muscle contractions, which causes twisting and jerking of the body or body part. Deep brain stimulation is generally used to help control abnormal movement of the body.
  • Design an architecture for the next generation of SES/SDPS and its relatinship to the world.“
    How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition
    College level cyber competition
    Sponsored by industry and academic partners
    2010 participation: 86 schools, over 600 students
    Multi-stage competition with finals in San Antonio
    Defensive in nature
    for more info
  • We have a lot of competition
    DCI is not unique in this mission. There are many strong competitors out there. Descriptions of some of the strengths of these regions available in DCI report available on line.
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam/Tanik
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • Design an architecture for the next generation of SES/SDPS and its relatinship to the world.“
    How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • In ancient Japan the haiku poets used phonemes--rather than symbols--therefore the counts may be off a bit when you are reading these haiku as a reference.
    The moment two bubbles
    are united, they both vanish.
    A lotus blooms.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
    (5) The moment two are
    (7) united they both vanish, A
    (5) lotus blooms here.
    Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell
    http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time
  • Design an architecture for the next generation of SES/SDPS and its relatinship to the world.“
    How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • Need source
  • Defense Secretary Charles Wilson
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Apollo 11 was the spaceflight which landed the first humans, Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr, on Earth's Moon on July 20, 1969, The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle'
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle'
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle'
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle'
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images). The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle'
    The Apollo 11 Lunar Module 'Eagle' begins its ascent to rendezvous with the Command/Service Module 'Columbia' after its successful lunar landing, 21st July 1969. Picture taken from the Columbia. (Photo by Space Frontiers/Getty Images)
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam/Tanik
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • How can SDPS/SES engage non-computer-software-engineering societies to “create” the “civilizing effect?” Ramamoorthy, Yeh, Weinberg, Tanik and Sadasivam
    “What are the essential questions” SDPS/SES must ask related to concentration, creativity, visualization, immersion, formailization, compassion, transformative research and the civilizing effect in order to have a constructive impact in the world? Sadasivam/Tanik
    How can this SDPS/SES movement account for “relevant cultural and social value factors” in the next generation? Kozmetsky
    What is the “learning[-life] experience” that characterizes transformative and transdisciplinary systems? Ramamoorthy
    The Surprise: All science is wrong. There is no such thing as failure—only feedback. We believe in and value intuition. Interpretation of Piaget/Tanik
    How will we achieve the “civilizing effect” grand vision while balancing the practical day-to-day expectation and constraints? Weinberg and Yeh
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Michiganworks

    1. 1. Future Next Exit: What’s Next in Technology, Education, Jobs & Economic Development Michigan Works, Jim Brazell
    2. 2. “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the mountain or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.” http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/
    3. 3. http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/
    4. 4. “I do not think Maui is any different than the mainland…post industrialization has placed greater demands on math and education.” –Rose Yamada, elder
    5. 5. “I am looking at the intersection of these technologies—where they overlap.” --Mark Hoffman, ECET Program Coordinator, MCC
    6. 6. Mechatronics The synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control systems and computers. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Optics
    7. 7. Hawiian Translation
    8. 8. “Ahupua’a”
    9. 9. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    10. 10. “Ahupua’a” Integrated, holistic system
    11. 11. “Ho’ohanalima”
    12. 12. . Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Fishpond located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
    13. 13. Opihi Population Health Assessment Research Study– Kihei Charter School
    14. 14. Waipulani Longitudinal Algae Research Project – Kihei Charter School
    15. 15. “Alignment of culture and STEM is the underpinning of everything we do.” –Jeanne Unemori Skog, CEO, medb
    16. 16. Applied Problem Solving World Knowledge The key literacy of the 21st century is transdisciplinarity.
    17. 17. Innovation is a function of moving beyond the disciplines, solving real world problems and integrating theory and applied techniques to create new knowledge, tools, processes, and systems. In a word transdisciplinarity.
    18. 18. http://www.dentonrc.com/sharedcontent/utilities/clickedimage/index.html
    19. 19. SURVIVAL ENVIRO SECURITY LIFE QUALITY WEALTH JOBS INNOVATION How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    20. 20. Indian River State College Current and Emerging Pattern Languages Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Leadership Humanities-Law-Human Development Engineering-Design-*C.S. Medical-Bio-Life Sciences Architecture, Media & Arts Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Leadership FLOW: A Pattern for Play, Learning, Cooperation and Invention *C.S. - Computer science Faculty Students World Community
    21. 21. STEMacademic and CTE
    22. 22. Technology Engineering Mathematics Science ARTS How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    23. 23. How CyberPatriot works • Multi-round competition – Qualifying rounds are virtual and teams compete simultaneously – Teams download VMware images and attempt to secure them over a given period of time – Teams connected to centralized scoring platform – Teams graded against known solution sets • Finals held in Orlando and Washington DC
    24. 24. Engineering Design Scientific Inquiry Computer Science Mathematics Convergence
    25. 25. What’s Next
    26. 26. CTE Arts Health Academics Classical Contemporary Education How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    27. 27. Organizing for STEM Education Shift Organizing TEAMS for Innovation
    28. 28. http://www.olin.edu/
    29. 29. http://www.olin.edu/
    30. 30. http://www.olin.edu/
    31. 31. http://www.olin.edu/
    32. 32. Activity BLOSSOM - What is the ideal future state of ed, workforce and economic development collaboration?
    33. 33. 52
    34. 34. ? What is the ideal future state of ed, workforce and economic development collaboration?
    35. 35. ? What is the ideal future state of ed, workforce and economic development collaboration?
    36. 36. ? What is the ideal future state of ed, workforce and economic development collaboration?
    37. 37. 56
    38. 38. Workforce Economic Development Education
    39. 39. What do you think of when I say?
    40. 40. Robot
    41. 41. John Hart / AP
    42. 42. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    43. 43. http://ae45ipb.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/masa-depan-pertanian-ada-di-tangan-robotikabisakah/
    44. 44. 63
    45. 45. Lost in Space
    46. 46. The Day the Earth Stood Still
    47. 47. Robots are now part of the fabric of 21st century life, work and play.
    48. 48. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 PLEO
    49. 49. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 “A robotic life form with an evolving Personality.” --Ugobe PLEO by Tom Atwood, ROBOT Spring 2008
    50. 50. Home Technology
    51. 51. http://www.coaster-net.com/park-gallery/37-islands-of-adventure/photos/90-harry-potter-and-the-forbidden-journey-artwork/12887 Harry Potter & the Forbidden Journey
    52. 52. Software Computer Electrical Mechanical ROBOT How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    53. 53. http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
    54. 54. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    55. 55. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-473040/The-car-stops-drink-driving.html
    56. 56. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    57. 57. Information-based computing Cyber physical proces control & communications Emerging Tech
    58. 58. Information Age Robot Age Emerging Tech
    59. 59. Knowledge Jobs Skill Jobs Jobs Today
    60. 60. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 D-J Engineering Engineering Design $50K - $180K Machinists & Sheet Metal $22K - $42K --Razaul A. Chowdhury, President
    61. 61. Specialized Knowledge & Skills Systems Knowledge & Skills Emerging Jobs
    62. 62. Wyoming ACTE, June 2009
    63. 63. “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    64. 64. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
    65. 65. http://medgadget.com/archives/2010/01/corventis_gets_us_ok_for_wireless_cardiac_arrhythmia_monitoring_system.html PiiX® monitors physiological signals including heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, fluid status, posture and activity are automatically collected throughout the course of use. Proprietary algorithms embedded in the PiiX also enable the automatic capture of ECG when arrhythmias are detected.
    66. 66. MedApps HealthPAL http://www.flickr.com/photos/timgee/3533875453/sizes/o/in/photostream/
    67. 67. Wesley Medical Center, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    68. 68. http://medgadget.com/archives/2010/01/corventis_gets_us_ok_for_wireless_cardiac_arrhythmia_monitoring_system.html “... the atrial fibrillation patch could detect when a congestive heart patient requires a “20-cent diuretic” — which, in the long run, could avoid a “$6,000 hospital admission” Darrell Drinan, CEO, Philometorn, San Diego.
    69. 69. In 1958, engineer Earl Bakken of Minneapolis, Minnesota, produced the first wearable external pacemaker http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2007/10/29/batterypacemaker/
    70. 70. A Pacemaker the Size of a Tic Tac - Medtronic is using microelectronics to make a pacemaker so small it can be injected. Technology Review http://www.technologyreview.com/biomedicine/32436/?nlid=4177
    71. 71. Software Computers Electrical Machines Chemistry How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    72. 72. Software Computers Electrical Machines Biology How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    73. 73. National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Peoria, IL Agricultural Genomics
    74. 74. JohnBlangero,Ph.D. ComputationalGenetics
    75. 75. Software Computers Electrical Machines Physics How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    76. 76. 4.16.2007, Baylor Waco
    77. 77. Electronics Machines Software Computers 21st Century Architecture PHYS CHEM NEURO BIO Systems
    78. 78. Medtronic – Deep Brain Stimulation Parkinson's disease, Essential Tremor and Dystopia http://www.neurotexasinstitute.com/our-procedures/deep-brain-stimulation.aspx
    79. 79. FIRST LEGO® LEAGUE Over 80,000 middle- school students in 34 countries participate in the Nano Quest Challenge. 2006 NANO QUEST CHALLENGE
    80. 80. STEM Jobs
    81. 81. 5.5% STEM JOBS In 2010, 5.5% of jobs, or 7.6 million jobs (1 in 18), in the U.S. are considered STEM jobs according to the US Bureau of Economics. STEM occupations are projected to grow by 17.0 percent from 2008 to 2018, compared to 9.8 percent growth for non-STEM occupations. http://www.esa.doc.gov/sites/default/files/reports/documents/stemfinalyjuly14_1.pdf
    82. 82. 5.5% STEM JOBS ½ of STEM Jobs are Network and Information Tech
    83. 83. There are between 3.8 and 5.8 million people in the US employed in NIT. Computer and mathematical occupations are projected to add 785,700 new jobs from 2008 to 2018. As a group, these jobs are forecast to grow more than twice as fast as the average for all occupations in the economy. http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-nitrd-report-2010.pdf
    84. 84. Technology impacts all jobs and academic disciplines—all aspects of life. 5.5% STEM JOBS
    85. 85. Eng. Math TECHScience INNOVATION How do we cultivate innovation and innovators? Innovation Technology Processes & Design ARTS
    86. 86. Of the two million U.S. arts jobs requiring significant technology proficiency: • 10% architects • 11% artists, art directors and animators • 7% producers and directors and • 7% photographers The products of these disciplines represent 6.4% of the U.S. economy and over $126 billion annually in revenue from foreign trade. Read more at Arts in the Workforce. http://www.nea.gov/research/ArtistsInWorkforce.pdf and Siwek in http://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/pub4199.pdf
    87. 87. How many degrees do you have built around this?
    88. 88. 115 Origo may be the last toy you ever have to buy for your child. The prototype 3D printer under development by Artur Tchoukanov and Joris Peels allows children aged ten and up to design figurines and shapes on a computer, and then print them out to play with. Instead of buying your children more toys, let them make their own. Cost: $800.00 http://singularityhub.com/2011/10/12/origos-3d-printer-could-be-the-last-toy-your-ten-year-old-will-ever-need/
    89. 89. Tools for Schools
    90. 90. 118118
    91. 91. Activity SPEED DESIGN
    92. 92. Activity - Speed Design • Identify as many obstacles to your ideal state of ed, workforce and economic development collaboration. • When time is called, STOP!
    93. 93. Activity - Speed Design • Scribes rotate to the next table. • Circle the BIGGEST OBSTACLE on the list and for 5 minutes, propose as many strategies to mitigate your obstacles. • When time is called STOP!
    94. 94. Activity - Speed Design • Scribes rotate to the next table. • Circle the most promising strategy for mitigating the obstacle and for 5 minutes list the resources you will need to successfully execute the strategy. • When time is called STOP!
    95. 95. What do you think of when I say?
    96. 96. Computer Model
    97. 97. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review How many of you have a cell phone in your pocket?
    98. 98. Mixed Reality
    99. 99. Social Cognitive VirtualPhysical cyberSPACE How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    100. 100. Sea Land SpaceAir cyberSPACE How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    101. 101. 5th World
    102. 102. Imagine the games we can play…
    103. 103. Star Wars TIE FIGHTER for I-Phone
    104. 104. What’s Next
    105. 105. 139 Googles’Project Glass
    106. 106. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20927943.800-smart-contact-lenses-for-health-and-headup-displays.html Babak Parviz at the University of Washington in Seattle created a prototype contact lens containing a single red LED. Using the same technology, he has now created a lens capable of monitoring glucose levels in people with diabetes.
    107. 107. Implications
    108. 108. Education Civil Society Econ Dev Workforce Cyber How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    109. 109. There are between 3.8 and 5.8 million people in the US employed in NIT. Computer and mathematical occupations are projected to add 785,700 new jobs from 2008 to 2018. As a group, these jobs are forecast to grow more than twice as fast as the average for all occupations in the economy. http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-nitrd-report-2010.pdf
    110. 110. Special emphasis should be placed on the intersection of network and information technology (NIT). Cyber and the arts, cyber security, games and simulations, health, energy, transportation, environmental science, physical science and health science. http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-nitrd-report-2010.pdf
    111. 111. Innovation Model
    112. 112. Health Arts Academics CTE Cyber How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    113. 113. Sparkfun.com
    114. 114. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
    115. 115. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
    116. 116. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    117. 117. Holmes High School and San Antonio Cyber Initiative
    118. 118. Cyber Patriot highschoolcdc.com Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/default/article/Students-hoping-to-ridethe-cybersecurity-wave-1043235.php#ixzz1IBe4Gqls
    119. 119. http://www.defense.gov/dodcmsshare/homepagephoto/2007-05/hires_070530-D-7203T-001a.jpg
    120. 120. Source, DIAC, Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR), Pattern Languages for the 21st Century, Brazell and Monroe, 2003
    121. 121. Tools for Schools
    122. 122. Scratch.MIT.edu
    123. 123. C CS2N.org
    124. 124. cyberwatchcenter.org
    125. 125. How CyberPatriot works • Multi-round competition – Qualifying rounds are virtual and teams compete simultaneously – Teams download VMware images and attempt to secure them over a given period of time – Teams connected to centralized scoring platform – Teams graded against known solution sets • Finals held in Orlando and Washington DC Cyber Patriot highschoolcdc.com
    126. 126. nationalccdc.org
    127. 127. How many degrees do you have built around this?
    128. 128. What do you think of when I say?
    129. 129. Video Game
    130. 130. http://www.asian-central.com/stuffasianpeoplelike/wp-content/uploads/HLIC/60b946b73917e466527e739ecf1ebe1a.jpg
    131. 131. Your body controls the computer
    132. 132. Or, is the computer controlling us? Who is controlling whom?
    133. 133. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    134. 134. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    135. 135. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html
    136. 136. Imagine how this changes e-learning.
    137. 137. 92 Demo! Randy Brown randy.brown@virtualheroes.com Virtual Heroes Inc. http://www.virtualheroes.com
    138. 138. http://andrewchee.com/work/nike-fuel/
    139. 139. http://andrewchee.com/work/nike-fuel/
    140. 140. What’s Next
    141. 141. 185 A wide array of electrical components, including sensors, transistors, power supplies such as solar cells and wireless antennas, can be combined on a single device that is a wearable tattoo. UC San Diego http://neurogadget.com/2011/08/16/high-tech-gadget-sticks-to-skin-like-temporary-tattoo/2551
    142. 142. Implications
    143. 143. Technology Engineering Mathematics Science ARTS How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    144. 144. Of the two million U.S. arts jobs requiring significant technology proficiency: • 10% architects • 11% artists, art directors and animators • 7% producers and directors and • 7% photographers The products of these disciplines represent 6.4% of the U.S. economy and over $126 billion annually in revenue from foreign trade. Read more at Arts in the Workforce. http://www.nea.gov/research/ArtistsInWorkforce.pdf and Siwek in http://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/pub4199.pdf
    145. 145. National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts K-12 Schools Bring computer science into the National Curriculum as an essential discipline. Use video games and visual effects at school to draw greater numbers of young people into STEM and computer science. Encourage art-tech crossover and work-based learning through school clubs. http://www.nesta.org.uk/home1/assets/features/next_gen
    146. 146. Emerging Technopolis US Digital Convergence Centers • New York City • Washington DC MSA • Central Florida • San Francisco/Silicon Valley • Los Angeles • San Diego MSA • Phoenix • Denver • Las Vegas • Austin-San Antonio- Waco Global Digital Convergence Centers • South Korea • Finland • China • Taiwan • Sweden • Denmark • Germany • UK • Israel • Malaysia • Japan Evans, Eliza, Michael Sekora, Alexander Cavalli, Kinman Chan, Jeeyoung Heo Kenneth Kan, Yue Kuang, Prakash Mohandas, Xiaoxiang Zhang, and Jim Brazell. Digital Convergence Initiative: Creating Sustainable Competitive Advantage in Texas. San Marcos, Texas: Greater Austin- San Antonio Corridor Council, 2005. Full Report: http://www.dcitexas.org/DCI_report.pdf
    147. 147. California IT2 - UCSD
    148. 148. Engineering Design Scientific Inquiry Computer Science Mathematics Arts Convergence
    149. 149. transitioning from a manufacturing to an innovation economy http://mit.edu/cre/research/ncc/proceedings/ncc-casestudies.pdf
    150. 150. http://www.flickr.com/photos/rosrusspix/3537368960/sizes/o/in/photostream/
    151. 151. Today, Finland’s progressive strategy includes: multi-disciplinary and multi-industry collaboration to integrate nano science-, bio science-, information science- and cognitive science-based research and development (Tieke, 2005, p.9); converging design, art and science in the contexts of education and human development (Tahkokallio and Koivusilta, 2004, p.1); national R&D policy and urban-rural development establishing connected regional centers of innovation; partnering with global high tech markets and industries (Embassy of Switzerland, Beijing, 2005, p.12); and leading the world in “Public-Private Partnership” (with efforts dating back to the year of their independence, 1917) (Tieke, 2005, p.12-15).
    152. 152. “…newer programs like Pre- engineering, Biomedical Sciences, Manufacturing Engineering Technologies, and Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness are attracting more and more students.” Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    153. 153. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    154. 154. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    155. 155. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    156. 156. http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/F8A34712-B21E-4DC2-A186-9144565375F2/18653/InteractiveMediaProduction1.doc
    157. 157. TEAMS Model Schools Systems of Systems • High degree of faculty interaction across disciplines and grades (systems) • Integrating CTE, Arts and Academics (systems) • Learning laboratories and worldly experience with industry-standard tools, processes and problems (systems) • Emerging P-20 systems (P-20) -- Sequenced, integrated and transferable courses HS to CTC to University (systems) • Transdisciplinary culture (systems) Context and frame for learning is real world, purpose driven and action oriented.
    158. 158. Innovation Model
    159. 159. Technology Engineering Mathematics Science ARTS How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    160. 160. Ocoee Demonstration Middle School
    161. 161. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    162. 162. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    163. 163. Orlando FIEA University Program
    164. 164. College University Econ Dev Workforce K-12 How do we cultivate innovation and innovators?
    165. 165. Tools for Schools
    166. 166. ©numedeon,inc.2004 SPACE STATION
    167. 167. Whyville.net
    168. 168. http://www-01.ibm.com/software/solutions/soa/innov8/cityone/index.html
    169. 169. ALICE.org
    170. 170. How many degrees do you have built around this?
    171. 171. Activity - Revolution! • Based on everything we’ve done today, write and present a narrative declaration about the ideal ed, workforce and economic development collaboration. • Make it a powerful story telling us what you will commit to doing to achieve the goal so we’ll know where you stand! • Hint: You have an ideal system and obstacles, strategies, & resources, engineer the obstacles out of the system in the declaration. • On the last frame, design a flag or logo. • If you draw - Create a story board of key frames depicting your tale.
    172. 172. 226
    173. 173. 227
    174. 174. We the people of Evergreen believe that working as a community is important. We will work to connect mentors and networks of professionals in technology, engineering, arts, mathematics, and science (TEAMS) to the school for teacher professional development where it is wanted. We will be mentors, build a mentor network, and discuss TEAMS careers, academics, and arts with our children and share technology with the community as a whole. We will foster programs that integrate human touch with technology and creativity to create a new generation of Silicon Valley leaders, entrepreneurs, and innovators born of the Evergreen school system. We promise to help bring in experts from local high technology industry who can teach about free software and web services we can use in the schools. Evergreen is a green field where we can design and pioneer the future of education with a Silicon Valleyculture of  innovation.
    175. 175. Education Workforce Economic Development
    176. 176. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    177. 177. Wealth  Creation Sustainability Security Quality of  Life YOU How do we cultivate innovation and  innovators?
    178. 178. Activity - Pick One • Pick the ONE most important, success-defining implementation of action that MUST OCCUR to achieve your ideal for teaching and learning. • Write on a piece of paper and give it to us.
    179. 179. • Process all the input from today • Prepare a report on the session work • Create a short video as a reminder of your work   What we’ll do next
    180. 180. That’s a Wrap! Thanks It has been GREAT FUN working with all of you!It has been GREAT FUN working with all of you!
    181. 181. Innovation Nation:  What’s Next in CO Education, Workforce & Economic Development CO State CTE Conference, July 16, 2012, Jim Brazell
    182. 182. Activity Write a haiku describing the change necessary to achieve your ideal for teaching and learning at Santa Rosa ISD.
    183. 183. Haiku is a Japanese poem composed of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Haiku usually emphasizes a season, intense emotion and vivid image designed to lead to an enlightened insight. (5) The moment two are (7) united they both vanish (5) A lotus blooms here. Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time Haiku the art of it all
    184. 184.   Keystrokes on canvas Mixed paints in a petri dish And murals of math Authors, Pre-Kindergarten-to-12th Grade Academic, Arts and CTE Teachers, Schools and Classrooms for Tomorrow: Instructional Leadership in the 21st Century, The David O. McKay School of Education and The Brigham Young University, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 9-11, 2011
    185. 185.   A culture at risk needs cooperation to create rewards Metropolitan Community College Omaha, NE
    186. 186. Self determined child iPhone in hand all day long Educators scream Authors, High School CTE Teachers and Community College Faculty, Roane State Community College Faculty Convocation and Regional Tech Prep Consortia Workshop, Roane, TN, August 24-25, 2011
    187. 187. Haiku - Christian Brothers, US (5) While reaching for stars (7) keep Frankenstein at heart (5) or worlds fall apart
    188. 188. Haiku (Syllables 5, 7, 5) (5) The moment two are (7) united they both vanish (5) A lotus blooms here. Murakami, Kijo. (1865-1938), Adapted by Brazell http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/#time Bonus - Cinquain (Syllables 2, 4, 6, 8, 2) Write a haiku describing the ideal future state of teaching and learning at Santa Rosa ISD.
    189. 189. Activity How can GOAL Academy engage students through purposeful action (projects, service learning, student defined capstone) resulting in higher motivation, relevance, and completion rates.
    190. 190. 2020 Horizons Work as a group at your table. Discuss only YOUR topic.  Select someone to take notes and be able to report your  table’s findings back to the entire group. What is the state of the world in 2017 with respect to: Science & Technology Civil Society Media & Communications Jobs The World Economy Pop Culture Culture Education
    191. 191. • Pick a card out of the hat • Walk in the shoes of this person • Write a short 1-paragraph story IN THE VOICE OF THIS PERSON telling us in detail about how this person is living (part of) the ideal future state of Goal Academy. • Teacher • Parent • Interventionist • Academic Director • Employer • Student
    192. 192. Innovation Nation:  What’s Next in CO Education, Workforce & Economic Development CO State CTE Conference, July 16, 2012, Jim Brazell
    193. 193. Humanities & Sciences Cultural & Technical Arts Indian River State College Current and Emerging Pattern Languages Act 3 – FUSION: Quantitative and qualitative rearticulation of the Whole
    194. 194. TEAMS Why are we here? What is our purpose? What do we know about the past? What is the human condition? How does science and technology relate to our current condition? What are we designing for the future? What are our future prospects?
    195. 195. Asimov’s Last Question
    196. 196. Indian River State College Current & Emerging Pattern Languages P-20 Integration: Networking the Points and Institutional Silos Primary Ed Secondary Ed College University Pre-K & K
    197. 197. $7.5 million project that immerses students in the hectic environment of a hospital's intensive care unit and places them in a first-person role as a health-care professional. Funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Pulse!! is being developed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, which in turn hired Hunt Valley (Md.)-based BreakAway to produce and design the platform. –Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2006/id20060410_051875.htm Pulse!!
    198. 198.  USC ISI and Tactical Language Training (ITSEC 2005)
    199. 199. Case study: Emergency Response  Training, Pjotr van Schothorst VSTEP BV, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    200. 200. seriousgames.dk
    201. 201. http://thewe.cc/thewe_/images_5/-/child-labor/two-child-workers-eating-lunchi.jpe
    202. 202. “In this plant, in the  next three years we  will need nine  Instrumentation and  Numerical Control  (INC) technicians.”  Edward C. Trump  Plant Manager Entergy 4/2007,  TSTC Marshall
    203. 203. General Bernard  Schriever  Feb. 19, 1957 Inaugural Air Force Office of Scientific Research Astronautics Symposium in San Diego. Commander of Western Development Division Headquarters Charles Wilson
    204. 204. STEM  Knowledge Mergers Skill Mergers ?
    205. 205. http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Earth-View-From-The-Moon.jpg July 20, 1969
    206. 206. May 25, 2008 Phoenix Mars Probe
    207. 207. ROBOTS
    208. 208. Globalization Education Security Environment
    209. 209. Knowledge Organizations Industries Markets Technical Systems Human Capital Curricula
    210. 210. Workshop Activity #2 It’s 5 years in the future and your ideal CTE has failed. Discuss with your group and document your failure drivers from your team’s assigned perspective. Hint: Take responsibility for what will cause you* personally to fail.
    211. 211. Workshop Activity #2 Blossom - Define the ideal state of CTE in CO from your team’s assigned perspective.
    212. 212. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition  plus career and  academic exploration.
    213. 213. Organizing for STEM Education shift – Beyond the disciplines Organizing  TEAMS for  Innovation 
    214. 214. “STEM education,” as used in this report, includes the subjects of mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics, which have traditionally formed the core requirements of many state curricula at the K-12 level. In addition, the report includes other critical subjects, such as computer science, engineering, environmental science and geology, with whose fundamental concepts K-12 students should be familiar.
    215. 215. is used in national education policy, it is not implemented in a way that reflects the interdependence of the four STEM subjects.” NAE/NRC Committee on K-12 Engineering Education (2009)
    216. 216. applied mathematics, and engineering and technology, and their interconnections— which is to say the scientific enterprise as a whole. The basic point is that the ideas and practice of science, mathematics, and technology are so closely intertwined that we do not see how education in any one of them can be undertaken well in isolation from the others.” -Benchmarks for Science Literacy (1993)

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