pii2011: The Accidental Chief Privacy Officer

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privacy, identity, innovation 2011 Conference
May 2011

The first generation of chief privacy officers were typically attorneys, charged with the formulation and enforcement of privacy policies. Times have changed. Given the speed and complexity of technology, the privacy policy is necessary but hardly sufficient. Because we live much of our lives in public, both online and offline, the Internet is transforming the anonymity of our cities into the familiarity of small towns. Privacy is deeply ingrained within the technology that manages this personal data. The products and services driving this transformation must consider privacy from the earliest design sessions. Today’s engineer CPO, and I’m one, must deeply involve themselves with the technology and design process to bake-in privacy. This new breed of CPO is comfortable in an engineering scrum, product focus group, reviewing pending regulations, or analyzing A/B test results. The promise of the engineer CPO is that products, not only safeguard privacy, but compete on it.

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pii2011: The Accidental Chief Privacy Officer

  1. 1. The Accidental Chief Privacy Officer<br />privacy, identity, innovation 2011 conference<br />Jim AdlerChief Privacy Officer & General Manager, Data Systems@jim_adlerhttp://jimadler.me<br />Austin Alleman@allemanau<br />
  2. 2. Jim AdlerChief Privacy Officer & General Manager, Data Systems<br />Intelligence<br />I am not an<br />Attorney<br />Geek<br />Dweeb<br />Nerd<br />SocialIneptitude<br />Obsession<br />Dork<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Mark Zuckerberg<br />Real Names<br />Richard Feynman<br />Physics<br />Norio Ohga<br />Sony President<br />74 min CD<br />Jeff Jonas<br />Big Data<br />Privacy by Design<br />Steve Jobs<br />‘nuff said<br />Eclectic Innovators<br />
  5. 5. Evolution of Privacy<br />Austin Alleman@allemanau<br />Innocence<br />Frontier<br />Regulation<br />Innovation<br />
  6. 6. “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors”<br />− Robert Frost<br />“The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about.”<br />− Oscar Wilde<br />
  7. 7. ~20Exabytes<br />(20B GB)<br />Data from <br />dawn of civilization<br />through 2002<br />Data from <br />April 2011<br />
  8. 8. 2/3 of social network users have made adjustments to privacy settings <br />80% “very concerned” if photos used for marketing<br />68% “very concerned” if data used to serve them ads<br />Pew Internet and American Life Project<br />Frontier<br />
  9. 9. A Prescient Venn Diagram?<br />
  10. 10. Compliance is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for innovation. <br />Regulation<br />
  11. 11. Innovation<br />Hilary Mason’s Axiom<br />𝑀𝑎𝑡h+𝐶𝑜𝑑𝑒=𝐴𝑤𝑒𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒<br /> <br />
  12. 12. Quants<br />Making a killing on Wall Street but still can’t impress the chicks<br />Weakonomics.com<br />
  13. 13. Innovation<br />Corollary to Mason’s Axiom<br />𝑽𝒂𝒍𝒖𝒆𝒔 ∗𝑀𝑎𝑡h+𝐶𝑜𝑑𝑒=𝑆𝑢𝑝𝑒𝑟 𝐴𝑤𝑒𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒<br /> <br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Jim Adler“Accidental” Chief Privacy Officer & GM of Data Systemstwitter: @jim_adlerhttp://jimadler.me<br />

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