Successfully reported this slideshow.
DIKULT103: DIGITAL GENRES<br />General theories and introduction<br />Jan 20, 2011<br />Jill Walker Rettberg, Førsteamanue...
Readings:<br />Egenfeldt-Nielson, Simon, Jonas Heide Smith and Susana Pajares Tosca. Understanding Video Games: The Essent...
Also: a reading list of electronic literature, games, and digital art that you will be expected to be familiar with. These...
Pre-digital.<br />Len Lye: Swinging the Lambeth Walk. Video animation, 1937.<br />http://video.google.com/<br />videoplay?...
Digital.<br />Chris Milk: The Johnny Cash Project. (2010) <br />http://www.thejohnnycashproject.com<br />
Is there an essential difference between digital art and non-digital art?<br />
Manovich, 2001.<br />
Media and computing have developed in parallel for 200 years, almost converging again and again. <br />Manovich, Lev (2001...
The Jacquard Loom (1801)<br />
Daguerrotypes as new media infatuation<br />
Difference Engine (Babbage 1823)<br />
Analytical Engine (1837)<br />The first general purpose computer. <br />
(what if they had succeeded in building computers back then?)<br />
Fabrikkene fortsatte<br />
The Universal Turing Machine<br />(Alan Turing)<br />
“Zuse strip” –  KonradZuse used discarded 35mm movie film to make the first punched tape computer programs.<br />(Image fr...
There are five key differences between old and new media. <br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press....
1. Numerical Representation<br />
Media is programmable.<br />
This generates that.<br />Ted Warnell: “Poem Binary”<br />http://codepo.blogspot.com/2008/12/poem-binary.html<br />
2. Modularity<br />
“elements are assembled into larger objects but maintain their separate identities”<br />
3. Automation<br />
Numerically encoded modules pulled together on the fly (low-level automation)<br />
High-level automation<br />Kismet, the MIT robot that responds to your tone of voice (late 1990s)<br />
Easy access to data, search, re-use, remix<br />“War President” by Joe of American Leftist<br />
4. Variability<br />
content / interface<br />
Customise the work for each individual<br />Reason magazine’s customised covers, 2004.<br />http://www.npr.org/templates/s...
Customisation using Facebook Connect is popular these days<br />http://cnnbc.moveon.org/?rc=fbauto.txt5.pic3<br />
Or using Google’s immense databases<br />http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/<br />
Manovich talks about“branching interactivity”andhypermedia<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ba1BqJ4S2M<br />
Pressreturn or Y<br />sometimes pressing returnworks<br />Certainwords in thetext ”yield” and takeyou to a newpagewhenyouc...
yes<br />
Or ifyoupressedno:<br />
Sold as a book<br />afternoon, a story<br />av Michael Joyce<br />ISBN 1-884511-01-5<br />Macintosh eller Windows <br />US...
Ted Nelson:<br />”Well, by ”hypertext” I meannon-sequentialwriting – textthatbranches and allowschoices to thereader, best...
Tor Åge Bringsværd<br />”Faen. Nå har de senket takhøyden igjen. Må huske å kjøpe nye knebeskyttere.”<br />Med Jon Bing, S...
(you’ll hear more about hypertext)<br />
Is variability a useful term for thinking about a game?<br />
Variability seems to fit this well?<br />
(is this an example of variability?)<br />50 People See Their Own Shadow, by Neil Kandalgaonkar (“Brevity”), 2005. Flickr....
Salavon: Every Playboy Centerfold: The Decades<br />
Material principles (axioms)1. Numeric coding2. Modular organizationMore far-reaching (but dependent on the first two):3. ...
5. Transcoding<br />
There is a “conceptual transfer” from the computer world to culture at large. (page 47)<br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Lang...
Programmable media<br />
From media studies, we move to something that can be called software theory.<br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture

1,660 views

Published on

I don't usually do powerpoints for teaching, but somehow I started doing one for the first lecture in DIKULT103, and so I ended up piling it down with examples to talk about. This may not be very useful without reading the first 60 or so pages of Manovich's Language of New Media.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture

  1. 1. DIKULT103: DIGITAL GENRES<br />General theories and introduction<br />Jan 20, 2011<br />Jill Walker Rettberg, Førsteamanuensisi digital kultur<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Readings:<br />Egenfeldt-Nielson, Simon, Jonas Heide Smith and Susana Pajares Tosca. Understanding Video Games: The Essential Introduction. Routledge, 2008. 294 pages.<br />Tribe, Mark andReena Jana. New Media Art. Taschen, 2007/2009.<br />Wardrip-Fruin, Noah, and Nick Montfort. The New Media Reader. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003. (You will only need a few texts from this anthology, so if you don’t need it in other DIKULT courses you may manage by borrowing a copy.)<br />A collection of articles (kompendium) to be bought at Studia (315 kr).<br />
  4. 4. Also: a reading list of electronic literature, games, and digital art that you will be expected to be familiar with. These will be presented at the start of each section.<br />
  5. 5. Pre-digital.<br />Len Lye: Swinging the Lambeth Walk. Video animation, 1937.<br />http://video.google.com/<br />videoplay?docid=4059841348493635424#<br />
  6. 6. Digital.<br />Chris Milk: The Johnny Cash Project. (2010) <br />http://www.thejohnnycashproject.com<br />
  7. 7. Is there an essential difference between digital art and non-digital art?<br />
  8. 8. Manovich, 2001.<br />
  9. 9. Media and computing have developed in parallel for 200 years, almost converging again and again. <br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.<br />Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/<br />
  10. 10. The Jacquard Loom (1801)<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Daguerrotypes as new media infatuation<br />
  13. 13. Difference Engine (Babbage 1823)<br />
  14. 14. Analytical Engine (1837)<br />The first general purpose computer. <br />
  15. 15. (what if they had succeeded in building computers back then?)<br />
  16. 16. Fabrikkene fortsatte<br />
  17. 17. The Universal Turing Machine<br />(Alan Turing)<br />
  18. 18. “Zuse strip” – KonradZuse used discarded 35mm movie film to make the first punched tape computer programs.<br />(Image from http://www.casualoptimist.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/zuse-film.jpg)<br />
  19. 19.
  20. 20. There are five key differences between old and new media. <br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.<br />Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/<br />
  21. 21. 1. Numerical Representation<br />
  22. 22. Media is programmable.<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. This generates that.<br />Ted Warnell: “Poem Binary”<br />http://codepo.blogspot.com/2008/12/poem-binary.html<br />
  25. 25. 2. Modularity<br />
  26. 26. “elements are assembled into larger objects but maintain their separate identities”<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30.
  31. 31. 3. Automation<br />
  32. 32. Numerically encoded modules pulled together on the fly (low-level automation)<br />
  33. 33. High-level automation<br />Kismet, the MIT robot that responds to your tone of voice (late 1990s)<br />
  34. 34. Easy access to data, search, re-use, remix<br />“War President” by Joe of American Leftist<br />
  35. 35. 4. Variability<br />
  36. 36. content / interface<br />
  37. 37. Customise the work for each individual<br />Reason magazine’s customised covers, 2004.<br />http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1908113<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/lenejohansen/3276126816<br />
  38. 38. Customisation using Facebook Connect is popular these days<br />http://cnnbc.moveon.org/?rc=fbauto.txt5.pic3<br />
  39. 39. Or using Google’s immense databases<br />http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/<br />
  40. 40. Manovich talks about“branching interactivity”andhypermedia<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ba1BqJ4S2M<br />
  41. 41. Pressreturn or Y<br />sometimes pressing returnworks<br />Certainwords in thetext ”yield” and takeyou to a newpagewhenyouclickthem–but in thispiece, links aren’t marked<br />Youcanalsonavigateusingthecontrol strip.<br />
  42. 42. yes<br />
  43. 43. Or ifyoupressedno:<br />
  44. 44. Sold as a book<br />afternoon, a story<br />av Michael Joyce<br />ISBN 1-884511-01-5<br />Macintosh eller Windows <br />US$ 25.00<br />
  45. 45. Ted Nelson:<br />”Well, by ”hypertext” I meannon-sequentialwriting – textthatbranches and allowschoices to thereader, best read at an interactive screen.”<br />
  46. 46. Tor Åge Bringsværd<br />”Faen. Nå har de senket takhøyden igjen. Må huske å kjøpe nye knebeskyttere.”<br />Med Jon Bing, Sesam ’71<br />WebutgaveavnettkunstnerenMariusWatz: <br />http://www.evolutionzone.com/faen)<br />
  47. 47. (you’ll hear more about hypertext)<br />
  48. 48. Is variability a useful term for thinking about a game?<br />
  49. 49. Variability seems to fit this well?<br />
  50. 50. (is this an example of variability?)<br />50 People See Their Own Shadow, by Neil Kandalgaonkar (“Brevity”), 2005. Flickr.com.<br />
  51. 51. Salavon: Every Playboy Centerfold: The Decades<br />
  52. 52.
  53. 53. Material principles (axioms)1. Numeric coding2. Modular organizationMore far-reaching (but dependent on the first two):3. Automation4. VariabilityThe most substantial consquence of the computerization of media:5. Transcoding.<br />
  54. 54. 5. Transcoding<br />
  55. 55. There is a “conceptual transfer” from the computer world to culture at large. (page 47)<br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.<br />Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/<br />
  56. 56. Programmable media<br />
  57. 57. From media studies, we move to something that can be called software theory.<br />Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.<br />Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/<br />

×