History - #3<br />COM 135 Introduction to Journalism<br />
“A reporter is always concerned with tomorrow.  There’s nothing tangible of yesterday.  All I can say I’ve done is agitate...
Today’s Concepts<br />Yellow Journalism<br />Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Magazine Journalism – The Muckrakers<br />Radio News<...
A time in the late 1800s where two of New York’s newspapers engaged in fierce competition. <br />Pulitzer’s World and Hear...
Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Battle led to higher circulation.<br />William Randolph Hearst<br />     New York Journal<br />Jos...
Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Both legacies continue today.<br />William Randolph Hearst<br />     New York Journal<br />Joseph ...
Muckraking: reporters who used a style of early 1900s investigative journalism that emphasized a willingness to crawl arou...
<ul><li>Muckraking led to SOCIAL REFORM movements like Congress passing the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection...
Teddy Roosevelt named these  type of reporters “muckrakers”</li></li></ul><li>
Began in 1920s<br />Became first medium to provide 24 hour news coverage<br />Characterized by dramatic delivery and short...
Radio News<br />Notable Radio News Events:<br /><ul><li>Edward R. Murrow’s World War II reports
Charles Lindbergh’s flight
Hindenburg Disaster
War of the Worlds – Orson Welles
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COM 13500 Introduction to Journalism

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History #3 - slideshare

  1. 1. History - #3<br />COM 135 Introduction to Journalism<br />
  2. 2. “A reporter is always concerned with tomorrow. There’s nothing tangible of yesterday. All I can say I’ve done is agitate the air ten or fifteen minutes and then boom – it’s gone.”<br />Edward R. Murrow<br />
  3. 3. Today’s Concepts<br />Yellow Journalism<br />Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Magazine Journalism – The Muckrakers<br />Radio News<br />Television News<br />What now - ????<br />
  4. 4. A time in the late 1800s where two of New York’s newspapers engaged in fierce competition. <br />Pulitzer’s World and Hearst’s Journal<br />Highlights included sensationalized headlines, lavish photographs, stories of sin and sex, comics, and features.<br />Named “yellow” because of the first color comic, The Yellow Kid by Richard Outcault.<br />Yellow Journalism<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Battle led to higher circulation.<br />William Randolph Hearst<br /> New York Journal<br />Joseph Pulitzer<br /> The World<br />The two newspaper men battled for readers in late 1800s News York.<br />Their legendary battle climaxed with the Spanish-American War in Cuba.<br />
  7. 7. Hearst v. Pulitzer<br />Both legacies continue today.<br />William Randolph Hearst<br /> New York Journal<br />Joseph Pulitzer<br /> The World<br />Hearst’s legacy is that of the first media “mogul” – owning magazines, movie studios, and several newspapers across the country.<br />Pulitzer left yellow journalism behind and founded the first school of journalism, at Columbia University. He established the Pulitzer Prize, to encourage journalistic excellence.<br />
  8. 8. Muckraking: reporters who used a style of early 1900s investigative journalism that emphasized a willingness to crawl around in society’s muck to uncover a story<br />Characterized by journalists seeking social justice on important issues of the day such as education, shady business practices, and health.<br />McClure’s and Collier’s were two magazines that thrived off muckraking reports. Examples: 1902, Ida Tarbell’s “The History of Standard Oil”, and Lincoln Steffens’ “Shame of the Cities” <br />Magazine Journalism & The “Muckrakers”<br />
  9. 9. <ul><li>Muckraking led to SOCIAL REFORM movements like Congress passing the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act
  10. 10. Teddy Roosevelt named these type of reporters “muckrakers”</li></li></ul><li>
  11. 11. Began in 1920s<br />Became first medium to provide 24 hour news coverage<br />Characterized by dramatic delivery and short, concise writing<br />Public flocked to radio’s use of dramatic theatrics and music<br />Radio became mass medium during Great Depression. <br />It was “free entertainment” once you purchased the radio.<br />We see rise of networks – NBC and CBS<br />Newspaper publishers were concerned readers would stop buying newspapers<br />Radio News<br />
  12. 12. Radio News<br />Notable Radio News Events:<br /><ul><li>Edward R. Murrow’s World War II reports
  13. 13. Charles Lindbergh’s flight
  14. 14. Hindenburg Disaster
  15. 15. War of the Worlds – Orson Welles
  16. 16. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “fireside chats”</li></li></ul><li>Television News <br />Added pictures to dramatic writing<br />Came after “newsreels”<br />Those were film-style video news pieces shown in movie theaters<br />Networks NBC and CBS move to television – 1939 begin commercial television broadcasts<br />Television journalism didn’t really take off until the 1960s<br />Newsman Edward R. Murrow moves from radio to television<br />
  17. 17. Television News <br />Notable Television News Events<br /><ul><li>President Kennedy’s Assassination – 1963
  18. 18. Vietnam War – 1960s-70s
  19. 19. Moon Landing – 1969
  20. 20. Walter Cronkite Anchors CBS News – 1968-1981
  21. 21. President Nixon Resigns - 1974
  22. 22. Ted Turner Founds CNN - 1980</li></li></ul><li>How are these news mediums functioning today?<br />Newspapers<br />Magazines<br />Radio<br />Television<br />

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