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Concep tual meaning change

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conceptual meaning change of English words

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Concep tual meaning change

  1. 1. CONCEPTual meaning changeOF ENGLISH WORDS<br />2007130711 강지헌, 2007130716 신은주<br />
  2. 2. CONTENTS<br />1. Conceptualism and Semantics<br />1) Conceptualism<br />2) Semantics<br />2. Change of Meaning<br />Types of Meaning Change<br />3. Conceptual Change of Meaning<br />1) Generalization<br />2) Specialization<br />4. Conclusion<br />
  3. 3. 1. Conceptualism and Semantics<br />Conceptualism<br /> - The philosophical theory that application of general words to a variety of objects reflects the existence of some mental entity<br />
  4. 4. 1. Conceptualism and Semantics<br />Semantics<br />- The branch of linguistics that deals with the meanings of words and sentences.<br />
  5. 5. 2. Change of Meaning<br />Darmesteter(1886:30)<br />Psychological Association<br />Variety of words signs<br />Characteristic of humanbeing<br />
  6. 6. 2. Change of Meaning <br />Types of Meaning Change<br />1) Young-soon Park<br />Generalization<br />Specialization<br />Transfer<br />
  7. 7. 2. Change of Meaning <br />Types of Meaning Change<br />2) Stern (1931:192)<br />
  8. 8. 3. Conceptual Change of Meaning<br />1. Generalization<br />Pen<br />Feather  Writing brush  writer<br />Horn<br />Butt, trumpet, car horn, morning glory<br />A. Goats have horns.<br />B. the knife has a horn handle.<br />C. the hunting horn blows at noon.<br />D. He sounded his horn as he approached the bend in the road.<br />E. The French horn has a beautiful sound.<br />
  9. 9. 3. Conceptual Change of Meaning <br />
  10. 10. 3. Conceptual Change of Meaning<br />2. Specialization<br />Family tree, Tree diagram<br />
  11. 11. 3. Conceptual Change of Meaning<br />2. Specialization<br />Wear<br />Old English<br />Verb. Put on the clothes<br />Middle English<br />Noun. Action of putting on the clothes<br />+ Verb. Fray<br />Modern English<br />Verb. Put on the clothes, shoes, socks, rings, gloves, hats, glasses, belt……<br /> + Verb. Make the road<br /> + Verb. Dim<br /> + Verb. Exhaust<br /> + Verb. Lose the impact<br /> + Verb. Lose the color or shining<br />
  12. 12. 3. Conceptual Change of Meaning <br />Wear<br />a. He's wearing a new coat.<br />b. I like this shirt, but the collar has worn.<br />c. You've worn a hole in your sock.<br />d. Heels of shoes wear down.<br />e. Does your brother wear glasses?<br />f. She's wearing a pearl necklace.<br />g. It's compulsory to wear seat belts when you are driving in England.<br />h. She wore her hair tied in a ribbon.<br />I. This coat will wear well if you look after it properly.<br />j. My father wore a smile when we arrived.<br />k. The villagers had worn a path through the fields.<br />l. He wore out his family with his complaining.<br />m. After hearing him tell the same joke five times, hearing it again wears thin.<br />n. The pain medication wore off after surgery.<br />o. Her lipstick wore off by noon.<br />
  13. 13. 4. Conclusion<br />Coexistence<br />Continual Process<br />Generalization<br />Pen, Horn ……<br />Specialization<br />Tree diagram, Wear ……<br />
  14. 14. Reference<br />Hong, Seungwook and Lee, Joohee. “A conceptological Change of Word Meaning in English.” Studies in Language 16-2, 185-207.<br />
  15. 15. 감사합니다.<br />

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