SURREALISM, MYTH, AND  PSYCHOANALYSIS
Introduction: Surrealism and difference Ideas of diversity and difference are  its most interesting features. Surrealist...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Sexual aspect of modernity  was a key concern for  Surrealists. From the ...
Joan Miro‟s Peinture (Painting), 1927                    A tenuous line is trailed                     across the vivid b...
Salvador Dali‟s Les Accommodations desdesirs (Accommodations of Desires), 1929                        Dream landscape    ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The desired effect was to reveal  the unconscious in  representation, and ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) First Surrealist Manifesto of 1924  Author : Breton, a writer and a poet....
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                    Andre Masson –                      produced numerous  ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                    Meret Oppenheim‟s Fur                     Breakfast – c...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Women, for the Surrealists, were closer  to that „place of madness‟, to th...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                  Surrealism valued                  here and drew         ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                    Pictures of                     Surrealists            ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                    I do Not See the                     (Woman) Hidden in ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The dreams that escape in Surrealism may  involve the dreams and fantasies...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The mythology that Surrealism  constructed for itself both focused on  „wo...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)                    Surrealists used many                     Freudian moti...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Freud argued that in the dream, there is both  „manifest‟ – what appears, ...
Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) For Freud, the unconscious was the first and  most important assertion of ...
Breton‟s Nadja Focus of Walter Benjamin‟s discussion in an  essay called “Surrealism: the last snapshot of the  European ...
Breton‟s Nadja (cont.) Desire, the main subject of  the book, is tied up with  looking, observing. Control, either socia...
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SURREALISM, MYTH, AND PSYCHOANALYSIS (part1)

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SURREALISM, MYTH, AND PSYCHOANALYSIS (part1)

  1. 1. SURREALISM, MYTH, AND PSYCHOANALYSIS
  2. 2. Introduction: Surrealism and difference Ideas of diversity and difference are its most interesting features. Surrealist work – shifting terrain of representation that constantly uses difference to generate meaning. Difference was expressed through metaphor of the „feminine‟ (central organizing metaphor of difference)
  3. 3. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Sexual aspect of modernity was a key concern for Surrealists. From the beginning, Surrealism was a heterogeneous movement. There was never stylistic unity.
  4. 4. Joan Miro‟s Peinture (Painting), 1927  A tenuous line is trailed across the vivid blue surface of the painting, leaving suggestions of forms, such as that of the breast on the right- hand side of the picture.  Never allows the imagery to become resolved or fixed.
  5. 5. Salvador Dali‟s Les Accommodations desdesirs (Accommodations of Desires), 1929  Dream landscape with the forms placed in an illusionistic space.  Relations between the forms are mysterious, as in a dream.
  6. 6. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The desired effect was to reveal the unconscious in representation, and to undo dominant conceptions of order and reality. Not only a matter of questioning „reality‟, but also of how „reality‟ was normally presented.
  7. 7. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) First Surrealist Manifesto of 1924  Author : Breton, a writer and a poet.  Surrealism: “psychic automatism in its pure state that should be expressed through the word or in any other manner”  Refusal to be prescriptive was part of the Surrealist commitment to invention, to the unexpected, and to allowing as little intervention as possible by the conscious mind.
  8. 8. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  Andre Masson – produced numerous „automatic‟drawings. - work on many levels of suggestiveness. - ink line scrawled over the page, returning frequently to erotic points of the body. - Surrealism:“complete state of distraction”
  9. 9. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  Meret Oppenheim‟s Fur Breakfast – cup, saucer, and spoon from Uniprix (department store), and covered these with fur of Chinese gazelle.  The familiarity of the form of the cup and saucer is shattered by the unexpected material, the fur, and the sexual connotations.  Became an icon of Surrealism
  10. 10. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Women, for the Surrealists, were closer to that „place of madness‟, to the unconscious, than men were. „Woman‟ was made the object of desire, who also stood as a sign for desire. Surrealism placed „woman‟ at its centre, as the focus of its dreams.
  11. 11. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  Surrealism valued here and drew attention to all that the „call to order‟ had repressed – the underside of modernity, the erotic, the bizarre, the unconscious material of mental life.
  12. 12. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  Pictures of Surrealists  Words at the bottom page read: “It is woman who casts the biggest shadow or projects the greatest light in out dreams.”
  13. 13. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  I do Not See the (Woman) Hidden in the Forest by Rene Magritte  Female body: common fantas  Woman – poet‟s muse and as „other‟ are stock motifs in Surrealist thinking.
  14. 14. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The dreams that escape in Surrealism may involve the dreams and fantasies of the male unconscious, but the way in which they are revealed is always a matter of representation. Surrealism placed sexuality and desire at the centre of its concerns. Associative and suggestiveness were positively courted in Surrealist imagery. Surrealism for Aragon, “mythology of the modern”
  15. 15. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) The mythology that Surrealism constructed for itself both focused on „woman‟ as „other‟, as closer to the unconscious than men. Surrealists saw the ideas of Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud as a means to criticize the existing social order and the dominant culture that they saw as repressive.
  16. 16. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.)  Surrealists used many Freudian motifs. They also had a poetic sense of the mechanisms involved in the dreaming process.  Max Ernst‟s Oedipus – collage
  17. 17. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) Freud argued that in the dream, there is both „manifest‟ – what appears, and „latent‟ – unconscious speaking Condensation - process by which the latent content is condensed or compressed into the manifest content. Displacement – process by which the focus is shifted in the dream from an important element to a seemingly insignificant one, through censorship.
  18. 18. Introduction: Surrealism anddifference (cont.) For Freud, the unconscious was the first and most important assertion of psychoanalysis. Surrealists explored the language of dreams and the processes of dream work. They looked inside themselves for what was infantile, but they also sought to explore memory lapses, the repressions, of a whole culture. Psychoanalytic theory addresses the differences between men and women. It has been used by feminist writers as a way of exploring the relations between the sexes.
  19. 19. Breton‟s Nadja Focus of Walter Benjamin‟s discussion in an essay called “Surrealism: the last snapshot of the European intelligentsia” Account of a chance encounter with a woman, Nadja, and with Paris itself. Breton meets Nadja as he wanders aimlessly through Paris.(flaner – stroll or dawdle; flaneur – someone who loafs about or loiters) Aimlessness – submission to whatever may happen, to risk
  20. 20. Breton‟s Nadja (cont.) Desire, the main subject of the book, is tied up with looking, observing. Control, either social or psychic, was seen by the Surrealists as a form of oppression.

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