The Healthy Panda Project          Vicki Harber, PhD          V k H b    Faculty of Physical Education &               Rec...
The student‐athleteWhat do we know about What do we know about  the student‐athlete?What do they bring to the   University...
Components of PerformanceNutrition            Physical   Technical            Tactical   Mental                           ...
Athletic Performance                       Smith DJ
“Injury” model                 Elliot et al
Create programs that:Create programs that:         p g1.Prevent injury,1. Prevent injury,2.Provide effective intervention ...
Surveillance/MonitoringWhat needs to be tracked? What needs to be tracked?• Injury? • Nutrition?       ii ?• Training (vol...
The Healthy Panda project: the                beginning• 1993 Joan Matthews‐White initiated the  1993 Joan Matthews White ...
Sport Science Association of Alberta  Sport Science Association of Alberta“Creating and maintaining optimal sport performa...
Data •   6 years (starting in 2004 2005)     6 years (starting in 2004‐2005) •   Approx 200 athletes/year •   Does not inc...
Age of menarche (%)            Age of menarche (%)Year            10‐15 yr                16‐18 yr2004‐2005       93      ...
Diets to reduce weight (%)Diets to reduce weight (%) Year        YES                NO 2004‐2005 2004 2005   17           ...
Satisfied with body (%)             Satisfied with body (%)Year                      YES              NO2004‐2005         ...
Eating disorder (%)                  Eating disorder (%)Year                      YES             NO2004‐2005             ...
What s next?              What’s next?• Continued data collection  Continued data collection• Data analysis• Provide infor...
Avoid the avoidable!!Avoid the avoidable!!
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy
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Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy

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Dr. Vicki Harber of the University of Alberta discusses how the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation uses research to better understand the physical needs of the female athlete, understand the risk factors female student-athletes face and take appropriate action to ensure their well-being.

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Healthy Panda Project: keeping University of Alberta's high performance female athletes healthy

  1. 1. The Healthy Panda Project Vicki Harber, PhD V k H b Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation University of Alberta
  2. 2. The student‐athleteWhat do we know about What do we know about the student‐athlete?What do they bring to the  University of Alberta? U i i f Alb ?What do they bring to your  sport?Are they capable of making  the best choices to  ensure strong academic  and athletic  performance?
  3. 3. Components of PerformanceNutrition Physical Technical Tactical Mental Sleep/Rest/Recovery
  4. 4. Athletic Performance Smith DJ
  5. 5. “Injury” model Elliot et al
  6. 6. Create programs that:Create programs that: p g1.Prevent injury,1. Prevent injury,2.Provide effective intervention when needed,2. Provide effective intervention when needed,2 Provide effective intervention when needed3.Educate and support athletes and coaches 3. Educate and support athletes and coaches  about sustained habits needed to ensure best  b i d h bi d d b training practices, performance and recovery.
  7. 7. Surveillance/MonitoringWhat needs to be tracked? What needs to be tracked?• Injury? • Nutrition? ii ?• Training (volume, load, intensity, etc)?• Sleep?• Recovery?• Others?
  8. 8. The Healthy Panda project: the  beginning• 1993 Joan Matthews‐White initiated the 1993 Joan Matthews White initiated the  change in medical questionnaire• female and male athletes completed the female and male athletes completed the  SAME medical questionnaires• Questionnaires were separated into FEMALE Questionnaires were separated into FEMALE  and MALE athlete• Additional questions added to FEMALE form Additional questions added to FEMALE form  to address nutrition, reproductive profile and  bone health
  9. 9. Sport Science Association of Alberta Sport Science Association of Alberta“Creating and maintaining optimal sport performance: Monitoring  injuries and medical issues within the female varsity athlete” i j i d di l i ithi th f l it thl t ”Background:Female athletes experience specific injuries and medical problems that  result from or impact their athletic activity.  The University of  result from or impact their athletic activity The University of Alberta does not keep a database or ongoing reporting system that  is dedicated to sports injury analysis or medical issues.   Our female  athletes rely on the sports medical staff for guidance to enable safe  participation in sport at the elite (varsity) level yet this type of  information is not monitored over time.  Interruptions to an  athlete’s training can best be avoided with effective prevention  programs.  In the event of such a disruption, rapid return to sport  programs In the event of such a disruption rapid return to sport can be supported by successful rehabilitation treatments.  Creating  and maintaining optimal sport performance for our athletes  requires an ongoing reporting system.
  10. 10. Data • 6 years (starting in 2004 2005) 6 years (starting in 2004‐2005) • Approx 200 athletes/year • Does not include curling and golf i l d li d lf • Questions ask about known risk factors  (menstrual profile, eating attitudes/habits,  bone health)Harber and Matthews‐White (unpublished)
  11. 11. Age of menarche (%) Age of menarche (%)Year 10‐15 yr 16‐18 yr2004‐2005 93 42005‐2006 86 62006‐2007 92 72007‐2008 89 92008‐2009 92 72009‐2010 89 8 Harber and Matthews‐White (unpublished)
  12. 12. Diets to reduce weight (%)Diets to reduce weight (%) Year YES NO 2004‐2005 2004 2005 17 82 2005‐2006 15 78 2006‐2007 11 87 2007‐2008 17 80 2008‐2009 18 79 2009 2010 2009‐2010 15 82 Harber and Matthews‐White (unpublished)
  13. 13. Satisfied with body (%) Satisfied with body (%)Year YES NO2004‐2005 80 192005‐2006 73 192006 20072006‐2007 78 212007‐2008 72 252008‐2009 76 222009‐2010 72 25 Harber and Matthews‐White (unpublished)
  14. 14. Eating disorder (%) Eating disorder (%)Year YES NO2004‐2005 0 992005‐2006 1 922006 20072006‐2007 0 972007‐2008 2 962008‐2009 3 962009‐2010 2 95Harber and Matthews‐White (unpublished)
  15. 15. What s next? What’s next?• Continued data collection Continued data collection• Data analysis• Provide information to coaches/athletes id i f i h / hl• Explore potential for improved  monitoring/surveillance• Other possibilities? p
  16. 16. Avoid the avoidable!!Avoid the avoidable!!

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