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software project management Cocomo model

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Software project management ->Cocomo model

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software project management Cocomo model

  1. 1. Software Project ManagementPresentation Topic: COCOMO I Presented by: Syed Mutahir Pirzada
  2. 2.  COCOMO stands for Constructive Cost Model "constructive" implies that the complexity First published by Dr. Barry Boehm in 1981 Two models being used. . . A. COCOMO I B. COCOMO II
  3. 3.  Also called COCOMO81 Underlying S/W life cycle is waterfall life cycle Boehm proposed three levels of the model: 1. Basic 2. Intermediate 3. Detailed
  4. 4.  A single-valued, static model Computes software development effort (and- cost) as a function of program size Expressed in estimated thousand delivered - source instructions (KDSI)
  5. 5.  It computes software development effort as a function of program Size and a set of fifteen "cost drivers" that include subjective assessments of product, hardware, Personnel, and project attributes.
  6. 6.  It incorporates all characteristics of the intermediate version With an assessment of the cost driver’s impact on each step (analysis, design, etc.) of the software engineering process
  7. 7. ADVANTAGES OF COCOMO81
  8. 8.  COCOMO is transparent One can see how it works unlike other models such as SLIM(Software lifecycle management) Drivers are particularly helpful to the estimator to understand the impact of different factors that affect project costs
  9. 9. DISADVANTAGES OF COCOMO81
  10. 10.  It is hard to accurately estimate KDSI early on in the project, when most effort estimates are required KDSI,(number of thousand delivered source instructions) actually, is not a size measure it is a length measure Extremely vulnerable to misclassification of the development mode Success depends largely on tuning the model to the needs of the organization, using historical data which is not always available

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