Brain exercise (2)

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Brain exercise (2)

  1. 1. A RESEARCH ANALYSIS OF PRACTICE IN THE CLASSROOM AFFECTING LEARNERS’ BRAINS AND THEIR KNOWLEDGE RETENTION<br />Jessica Hollon<br />12/7/09<br />BRAIN EXERCISE <br />
  2. 2. Presentation Outline<br />Overview of Research<br />Research Methods<br />Research Results<br />Conclusions<br />Recommendations<br />The Future<br />References<br />
  3. 3. Overview of Research<br />In recent years, what has come to be called brain based learning has been a major topic of discussion in education. <br />Much research on the effects of different techniques on students’ brains has lead to a lot of discussion on implementing different types of guided practice within classrooms. <br />Research has already shown that, “Practice builds neurological connections and thickens the insulating myelin sheath necessary for fluency, chunking of information, brain efficiency, and deep learning” (Hill, 2006). <br />However, teachers at Douglas Intermediate School, as well as other schools, find it hard to justify giving time for students to practice skills when there is pressure to cover so many topics in a short amount of time. <br />
  4. 4. Overview of Research<br />This research shows:<br /> How practice within a classroom can affect a student’s brain. <br />How teachers at Douglas Intermediate School are already using practice.<br />What curriculums are available for the teachers to facilitate this practice within their own classrooms.<br />
  5. 5. Overview of Research<br />All research was done in the area of reading where, “In all grades, 1-12, research shows independent reading practice is important to build vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, writing, and higher-order thinking skills” (Anderson, 1988) and in the area of math because, “Research shows that to be effective in building a math skill, practice must be coupled with instruction to assure students are successful at a high level” (Topping, 2000).<br />
  6. 6. Overview of Research<br /> This research is significant to the teachers at Douglas Intermediate School, because it answers these questions:<br />How can practice of concepts affect a person’s brain?<br />How much time do teachers, on average, at Douglas Intermediate School currently given for ungraded student practice of reading and math concepts?<br />What available curriculums and/or programs are there for use in guided practice?<br />How might teachers restructure their days to allow for guided practice within their classrooms?<br />
  7. 7. Methods<br />Primary Research <br /> Survey given to teachers at Douglas Intermediate School showed how they currently use practice of reading and math and what practice curriculum were available.<br /> Secondary Research<br /> Consulting past and recent research on the topic of brain based teaching, the formation of the human brain, and best teaching practices within a classroom setting and researching curriculums produced by educational material production companies. <br />
  8. 8. results<br />Objective 1<br /> How can practice of concepts affect a person’s brain?<br />The human brain is a complex organ. It has many functions in each person’s everyday life. Research shows that by exercising the brain, the functionality of the brain can be increased. The myelin sheath in the brain can be thickened and much like a weight lifter can bulk up by lifting more weight, students can also bulk up their brain power by practicing concepts. Specific concepts practiced in a no pressure time in the classroom can result in better retention of these concepts. <br />
  9. 9. results<br />Objective 2<br /> How much average daily time do teachers at Douglas Intermediate School currently given for ungraded student practice of reading and math concepts?<br />After analyzing the survey given to teachers at Douglas Intermediate School, it was found that teachers give differing amounts of this daily practice time. Interestingly, for each teacher, math practice time was always less then reading practice time. (See graph on following slide) <br />
  10. 10. results<br />
  11. 11. results<br />Objective 3 <br /> What available curriculums and/or programs are there for use in guided practice?<br /> According to staff at Douglas Intermediate School the follow programs are available for their use:<br /> Accelerated Reader Mountain Language<br /> Read Naturally Accelerated Math<br /> Reading Plus Fast Math<br /> Tune in to Reading Mountain Math<br /> SSR time<br />
  12. 12. results<br />Objective 4<br />How might teachers restructure their days to allow for guided practice within their classrooms?<br />Teachers who utilize this practice time reported that they use student groupings, and rotate through groups one group doing some type of practice. Other teachers report using a center like time within their classroom that rotated once each day, so everyone is at each center of practice once a week and the teachers floats between the centers. Also reported was that some teachers use before and after school time for student to use the computerized practice programs, because students can independently use these programs.<br />
  13. 13. Conclusions<br />Only a handful of teachers at Douglas Intermediate School use concept practice time to its full advantage. <br />The amount of programs already available at Douglas Intermediate School that have previously been purchased for student use, are not being used by many teachers and students. <br />Some teachers are thinking outside of the box in order to find time for students to use these programs. <br />Since research shows that this time is important to students and student learning, the use of these programs or lack of use of these programs is concerning.<br />
  14. 14. Recommendations<br />Recognize the positive aspect ungraded practice of concepts can bring to the classroom<br />Utilize the curriculums and programs that the school already has in order to facilitate student practice of concepts<br />Involve teachers in workshops and training for the use of these curriculums<br />Follow up on teachers’ daily use of such programs <br />
  15. 15. The future<br /> Once these steps are followed, hopefully the use of available programs will increase students’ retention of facts and students’ success at Douglas Intermediate School.<br />
  16. 16. references<br />Anderson, R. C. “Growth in Reading and How Children Spend Their Time Outside of School.” Reading Research Quarterly, 23.3 (1988): 285- 303.<br />Hill, N. M. Brain Changes in the Development of Expertise. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006.<br />Hollon, J. L. Survey of How Guided Practice is Currently Used in The Areas of Reading and Math. 26 October 2009.<br />Topping, K. J. “Teacher Effectiveness and Computer Assessment of Reading and Math: Relating Value-Added Learning Information Systems Data.” School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 11.3 (2000): 305-337<br />

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