1
Objectives
 Identify the importance of identifying a potential

corrosive risk
 Describe the common methods of identifyi...
Corrosive Detection
 Because corrosive materials usually cause harm to

humans and electronic device, corrosive materials...
Corrosive Detection
 pH paper is one of the most dependable tools a

responder can use
 It is recommended that pH paper ...
pH Measurement
 Corrosives can be both acids or bases
 pH is the measure of the hydrogen ions in the solution

 The ter...
pH Scale
 Most commonly 0-14
 Acids are materials with

pH of less than 7
 Bases are materials with
pH greater than 7
...
pH Measurement
 Common Materials
 Orange Juice pH 3
 Ammonia pH 13
 Vinger(acetic acid) pH 3
 Sodium hydroxide pH 13
...
pH Scale
 pH is based on a logarithmic scale
 When pH drops from 2 to 1 it is a factor of 10 stronger
 Material with a ...
Concentration
 Corrosives come in a variety of concentrations
 Most corrosives have some percentage of water in them
 S...
Concentration
 120-160 percent sulfuric acid is known as Oleum and is

infused with sulfur trioxide
 Also called fuming ...
Corrosive Risk
 All corrosives present some form of risk
 pH of less than 2 and greater than 11 present significant
pote...
pH Detection
 pH paper is most common method of pH detection
 Commonly come on a roll with a pH range of 1-12 or 0-13
 ...
pH Detection
 Some liquids cause

misleading readings with
pH paper

pH 4-8 most
likely neutral

 Use leading edge to

d...
Summary
 Detection of pH is important to your health and
safety
 Detection will protect electronic instruments
 Corrosi...
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Module 2 identifying corrosives, american fork fire rescue

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Module 2 identifying corrosives, american fork fire rescue

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. Objectives  Identify the importance of identifying a potential corrosive risk  Describe the common methods of identifying the corrosive risk  Describe the working definition of a corrosive material 2
  3. 3. Corrosive Detection  Because corrosive materials usually cause harm to humans and electronic device, corrosive materials:  burn or irritate humans  Render any electronic instrument useless fairly quick  Most monitors will work for a limited time than stop working and you may not know this happened 3
  4. 4. Corrosive Detection  pH paper is one of the most dependable tools a responder can use  It is recommended that pH paper be one of the first items down range at a chemical release  Easiest way is to attach a strip to an object or another instrument. 4
  5. 5. pH Measurement  Corrosives can be both acids or bases  pH is the measure of the hydrogen ions in the solution  The term pH can mean:  Potential of hydrogen  Power of hydrogen  Percent of hydrogen ions 5
  6. 6. pH Scale  Most commonly 0-14  Acids are materials with pH of less than 7  Bases are materials with pH greater than 7  A neutral material is one that has a pH of 7  Most states use a pH between 5 and 9 for legal neutral 6
  7. 7. pH Measurement  Common Materials  Orange Juice pH 3  Ammonia pH 13  Vinger(acetic acid) pH 3  Sodium hydroxide pH 13  Acetone pH 7  Hydrofluoric Acid pH 1  Sulfuric Acid pH0  Pepsi pH 2-3  Hydrochloric Acid pH 0  Oleum pH 1  Gasoline pH 7 7
  8. 8. pH Scale  pH is based on a logarithmic scale  When pH drops from 2 to 1 it is a factor of 10 stronger  Material with a pH of 1 is 10 times more acidic than something that has a pH of 2  Material with a pH of 3 is 100 times more acidic than one with a pH of 5  Many responders forget about this logarithmic scale when diluting a corrosive spill  It takes a lot less dilution volume when going from 6 to 7 than from 1 to 7 8
  9. 9. Concentration  Corrosives come in a variety of concentrations  Most corrosives have some percentage of water in them  Some are diluted to low percentages  Sulfuric acid comes in a range of concentrations  2 percent sulfuric is known as spent pickle liquor  30-37 percent is used in car batteries  98 percent is used in laboratories or industrial settings 9
  10. 10. Concentration  120-160 percent sulfuric acid is known as Oleum and is infused with sulfur trioxide  Also called fuming sulfuric acid  Highly concentrated acid fumes with high vapor pressure (Sulfur Trioxide VP=0.57 atm)  Corrosives without water are reactive  Oleum fumes released into the air interact with the water vapor to create a vapor cloud 10
  11. 11. Corrosive Risk  All corrosives present some form of risk  pH of less than 2 and greater than 11 present significant potential for skin contact injuries  Low pH materials like oleum will cause immediate burns $499  High pH materials like sodium hydroxide dissolve fats and break down cellular membranes  Corrosive in the eyes can cause immediate and permanent damage $595  Eye contact should be avoided 11
  12. 12. pH Detection  pH paper is most common method of pH detection  Commonly come on a roll with a pH range of 1-12 or 0-13  More expensive test strips can provide more detailed pH information  pH paper can determine presence of corrosive vapors in air  Not necessary to wet pH to detect vapors  pH paper can detect as low as 1 ppm anhydrous ammonia 12
  13. 13. pH Detection  Some liquids cause misleading readings with pH paper pH 4-8 most likely neutral  Use leading edge to determine accurate pH  Hydrocarbons typically pH 4-8 most likely Corrosive will provide a false positive 4 or 5 on pH paper 13
  14. 14. Summary  Detection of pH is important to your health and safety  Detection will protect electronic instruments  Corrosives are the second leading material released during chemical accident 14

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