LEMON - On Drupal diseases and cures

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LEMON studies the worst Drupal disasters and advocates for the need for quality throughout a development cycle.

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  • Good afternoon. Welcome to LEMON- Drupal diseases and cures. \n
  • My name is Jody Hamilton. Making lemonade since drupal 4.7\n\nZivtech Lead Developer, business owner, engineer, teacher, manager, quality freak\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • What is a Drupal lemon?\nA site that makes experienced drupal developers laugh and cry at the same time. Measure in WTFs per minute.\n\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • How many lemons are there?\nWhy are there so many?\nThe rise of the ‘site rescue’ job\nThis is bad for Drupal’s reputation\n\n - Lack of experts\n - new field\n - learning curve\n - Difficulty of field is underappreciated (ie you wouldn’t treat something ‘difficult’ like surgery the same way) The easiness of using drupal or basic site building also stands in confusing contrast to the difficulty of custom application development in drupal or excellent and advanced site building.\n - Rush jobs\n - Cheap jobs\n- Hard to assess Credentials\n - lack of certification\n - too complex for decision makers\n - Drupal has a completely transparent and inscrutable system for measuring dev quality\n- Drupal makes it easy to mess up (by being complex and flexible). With great power comes great need for training. Beware those who ‘know just enough to be dangerous’\n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • Let’s study this up close.\nWhat can we learn from Drupal lemons?\nI’ve been blessed with great opportunities throughout my life to learn from the worst\nPerhaps life has given me lemons\nBy studying worst practices we can desire and form best practices\nA lemon is always rushed and/or foolishly designed. On the cellular level it is starved for quality. The deeper you look the more you see problems.\nQuality means meeting professional standards throughout the process, not meeting specs by the end. Quality is holistic, is a mindset.\nBefore coming to the web I worked mainly in quality control, as a chemist. In pharmaceutical development quality control is taken extremely seriously, obviously its regulated by the FDA. They work to standards of quality at every stage in the process and the QC people are highly trained scientists. In software development quality control is often just testing the end result, sometimes outsourced. If time or budget gets short it can get skipped entirely. \n
  • the ''slingshotter,'' the ''adventurer,'' the ''marshmallow,'' the ''nomad'' and the ''weaver''\nUsability Lemon (developers who do not develop for usability are not web developers, much as designers who do not work in HTML/CSS are not web designers)\nInfested Lemon (bug-laden)\nFanboy Lemon (lots of junky contrib modules)\nDesperado Lemon (PHP dev wrote lots of custom code instead of using key modules)\n\n
  • the ''slingshotter,'' the ''adventurer,'' the ''marshmallow,'' the ''nomad'' and the ''weaver''\nUsability Lemon (developers who do not develop for usability are not web developers, much as designers who do not work in HTML/CSS are not web designers)\nInfested Lemon (bug-laden)\nFanboy Lemon (lots of junky contrib modules)\nDesperado Lemon (PHP dev wrote lots of custom code instead of using key modules)\n\n
  • the ''slingshotter,'' the ''adventurer,'' the ''marshmallow,'' the ''nomad'' and the ''weaver''\nUsability Lemon (developers who do not develop for usability are not web developers, much as designers who do not work in HTML/CSS are not web designers)\nInfested Lemon (bug-laden)\nFanboy Lemon (lots of junky contrib modules)\nDesperado Lemon (PHP dev wrote lots of custom code instead of using key modules)\n\n
  • the ''slingshotter,'' the ''adventurer,'' the ''marshmallow,'' the ''nomad'' and the ''weaver''\nUsability Lemon (developers who do not develop for usability are not web developers, much as designers who do not work in HTML/CSS are not web designers)\nInfested Lemon (bug-laden)\nFanboy Lemon (lots of junky contrib modules)\nDesperado Lemon (PHP dev wrote lots of custom code instead of using key modules)\n\n
  • the ''slingshotter,'' the ''adventurer,'' the ''marshmallow,'' the ''nomad'' and the ''weaver''\nUsability Lemon (developers who do not develop for usability are not web developers, much as designers who do not work in HTML/CSS are not web designers)\nInfested Lemon (bug-laden)\nFanboy Lemon (lots of junky contrib modules)\nDesperado Lemon (PHP dev wrote lots of custom code instead of using key modules)\n\n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Symptoms can be misleading. They could come from any or multiple layers of the stack\n \n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Warning signs...\n\nIgnoring the chain of command:\n inappropriate use of JS or CSS to deal with markup or logic-level problems (this indicates short-sighted or critically under-experienced web developers)\n the last two indicate developers who either don’t know Drupal well or don’t respect the integrity of the CMS or do not care about the future of the site (fixed budget/fixed specs much?)\n \n\n
  • Not every problem site is a lemon\n\nStaff usability (need a manual?!) problems are a bigger indication than public usability (closer to the structural)\n\nProblems that are mainly coming from CSS, JS, or server-side can cause bad symptoms but are easier to isolate and fix\n\nProblems may be coming from mostly just one place: a bad module for example\n\nA true lemon will have deep structural problems that have infected the code, configuration and content\n
  • Not every problem site is a lemon\n\nStaff usability (need a manual?!) problems are a bigger indication than public usability (closer to the structural)\n\nProblems that are mainly coming from CSS, JS, or server-side can cause bad symptoms but are easier to isolate and fix\n\nProblems may be coming from mostly just one place: a bad module for example\n\nA true lemon will have deep structural problems that have infected the code, configuration and content\n
  • Not every problem site is a lemon\n\nStaff usability (need a manual?!) problems are a bigger indication than public usability (closer to the structural)\n\nProblems that are mainly coming from CSS, JS, or server-side can cause bad symptoms but are easier to isolate and fix\n\nProblems may be coming from mostly just one place: a bad module for example\n\nA true lemon will have deep structural problems that have infected the code, configuration and content\n
  • Not every problem site is a lemon\n\nStaff usability (need a manual?!) problems are a bigger indication than public usability (closer to the structural)\n\nProblems that are mainly coming from CSS, JS, or server-side can cause bad symptoms but are easier to isolate and fix\n\nProblems may be coming from mostly just one place: a bad module for example\n\nA true lemon will have deep structural problems that have infected the code, configuration and content\n
  • Not every problem site is a lemon\n\nStaff usability (need a manual?!) problems are a bigger indication than public usability (closer to the structural)\n\nProblems that are mainly coming from CSS, JS, or server-side can cause bad symptoms but are easier to isolate and fix\n\nProblems may be coming from mostly just one place: a bad module for example\n\nA true lemon will have deep structural problems that have infected the code, configuration and content\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • Indicators and contraindicators are easy, but coming to a conclusion can be more difficult.\nDiagnosis is not easy and cannot usually be done ‘at a glance’ (or without a contract) except in the most extreme cases\n\nLack of adherence to semantic sense\nAsk for an honest opinion about your site and the level of your devs, ie in person (i’ve often had potentially useful observations that i would not feel comfortable sharing via email, conference call, or in situations that could politically threaten my status as a consultant)\n
  • A site can meet spec and have no serious bugs and still be a lemon.\nStaff may feel that all sites or all drupal sites have the kinds of frustrations they have, and devs may persist that feeling of ‘normal’ problems and even villify the software.\nThe lack of ability to easily expand and change the site, enormous difficulty upgrading the site, bug regressions, the need for a staff handbook, the need for excessive end-user help text, and site slowness are warning signs of a lemon in disguise.\nOften the seriousness of the problem is never known or is not acknowledged as true if diagnosed. These organizations may take it as a matter of course that you throw out crappy sites after a few years and then build a new crappy site and not see this as a problem. Experiencing the alternative will shed light on the problem.\n
  • A site can meet spec and have no serious bugs and still be a lemon.\nStaff may feel that all sites or all drupal sites have the kinds of frustrations they have, and devs may persist that feeling of ‘normal’ problems and even villify the software.\nThe lack of ability to easily expand and change the site, enormous difficulty upgrading the site, bug regressions, the need for a staff handbook, the need for excessive end-user help text, and site slowness are warning signs of a lemon in disguise.\nOften the seriousness of the problem is never known or is not acknowledged as true if diagnosed. These organizations may take it as a matter of course that you throw out crappy sites after a few years and then build a new crappy site and not see this as a problem. Experiencing the alternative will shed light on the problem.\n
  • A site can meet spec and have no serious bugs and still be a lemon.\nStaff may feel that all sites or all drupal sites have the kinds of frustrations they have, and devs may persist that feeling of ‘normal’ problems and even villify the software.\nThe lack of ability to easily expand and change the site, enormous difficulty upgrading the site, bug regressions, the need for a staff handbook, the need for excessive end-user help text, and site slowness are warning signs of a lemon in disguise.\nOften the seriousness of the problem is never known or is not acknowledged as true if diagnosed. These organizations may take it as a matter of course that you throw out crappy sites after a few years and then build a new crappy site and not see this as a problem. Experiencing the alternative will shed light on the problem.\n
  • A site can meet spec and have no serious bugs and still be a lemon.\nStaff may feel that all sites or all drupal sites have the kinds of frustrations they have, and devs may persist that feeling of ‘normal’ problems and even villify the software.\nThe lack of ability to easily expand and change the site, enormous difficulty upgrading the site, bug regressions, the need for a staff handbook, the need for excessive end-user help text, and site slowness are warning signs of a lemon in disguise.\nOften the seriousness of the problem is never known or is not acknowledged as true if diagnosed. These organizations may take it as a matter of course that you throw out crappy sites after a few years and then build a new crappy site and not see this as a problem. Experiencing the alternative will shed light on the problem.\n
  • A site can meet spec and have no serious bugs and still be a lemon.\nStaff may feel that all sites or all drupal sites have the kinds of frustrations they have, and devs may persist that feeling of ‘normal’ problems and even villify the software.\nThe lack of ability to easily expand and change the site, enormous difficulty upgrading the site, bug regressions, the need for a staff handbook, the need for excessive end-user help text, and site slowness are warning signs of a lemon in disguise.\nOften the seriousness of the problem is never known or is not acknowledged as true if diagnosed. These organizations may take it as a matter of course that you throw out crappy sites after a few years and then build a new crappy site and not see this as a problem. Experiencing the alternative will shed light on the problem.\n
  • some lemons are unusual. these are the grotesque distorted results of organizational politics rather than technical failures.\nintegrating with other software in strange and difficult ways based on vendor relationships without regard for technical concerns\nan unnecessary convoluted mediawiki integration to justify previous expenses\ncomplex unnecessary video conversion/hosting system\na separate cms creates the blocks?\nyou can’t do basic drupal tasks?\nit’s drupal static?!\n
  • some lemons are unusual. these are the grotesque distorted results of organizational politics rather than technical failures.\nintegrating with other software in strange and difficult ways based on vendor relationships without regard for technical concerns\nan unnecessary convoluted mediawiki integration to justify previous expenses\ncomplex unnecessary video conversion/hosting system\na separate cms creates the blocks?\nyou can’t do basic drupal tasks?\nit’s drupal static?!\n
  • some lemons are unusual. these are the grotesque distorted results of organizational politics rather than technical failures.\nintegrating with other software in strange and difficult ways based on vendor relationships without regard for technical concerns\nan unnecessary convoluted mediawiki integration to justify previous expenses\ncomplex unnecessary video conversion/hosting system\na separate cms creates the blocks?\nyou can’t do basic drupal tasks?\nit’s drupal static?!\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • AKA birth of a lemon / how to make sure you get a lemon\nRisk Factors...\nSubcontracting\n Designers as developers\nInternal staff with little Drupal background\nNot doing your homework\nOrganic site architecting\nToo many cooks, too little chefs\nUnderpaying (if you think experts are expensive, wait until you hire an amateur)\n you get what you pay for (compare to other fields, some things you don’t want to cheap out on)\nMistaking an amateur for an expert = understandable \nTreating an expert like an amateur (ie not taking good advice you paid for) = foolish\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • An ounce of prevention...\n\nPrevention is the main point of this talk. I want you to understand what a lemon is, how hard it is to fix, and think about how to adjust your process and get the help you need (whether you’re a dev or a decision maker) to ensure you don’t create them. You may need training, a longer timeline, a consultant, less features, a change in philosophy, etc.\n\nGet good advice as early as possible. Before you write the RFP if possible! The later in the process the problems are dealt with the more expensive it will be. ‘You can hire me now... or you can hire me to fix it later...’\n\nA sterile growing environment (adequate time, staff, sleep, planning, thoughtfulness). Do you take time to think or are you rushed to put out fires? A series of crises does not make for good results, and is not an inevitable way we have to work.\n\nHiring\nAn expert lead gardener who is heeded\nVetting drupal developers (open source)\n\nContinual pest control (not wait for an infestation and then bomb the greenhouse)\n\nPeer review\n\nAn effective ticketing, development, version control systems and surrounding process\n\nThinking long term (a Drupal site should be always ready to adapt and grow with your organization and not treated as a one-time project that will probably be thrown out like the site it’s replacing)\n\n\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • Incurable / Systemic\nThe definition of a lemon (car) is that you need a replacement not another trip to the mechanic.\nWith a website you often need to at the minimum salvage parts (content, users, design), which means that you may be in a position in which the replacement may be harder (more expensive) than having done it right originally.\n\nMany lemon owners opt to throw good money after bad, perhaps to save face or for political reasons\nThe bigger lemon (is your boss the lemon??): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lodigs/89161130/\nSometimes the organizations that have the lemon sites are lemons themselves - the website project may not be the only thing that was mismanaged. Working with these clients you may find that the problem is not technical, and that any project will be doomed. This takes the fun out of the lemonade challenge (when hiring for a site rescue you’ll want to convince a potential vendor that the organization has learned from the past mistake - many good devs will avoid these projects) We have seen this kind of lemon eventually made moot when either higher ups scrap the entire project, or the organization is sold or goes under.\nThe worst offending sites rarely are granted proper treatment. Most sites that ask for a site audit are actually in pretty good shape. We’ve been brought in for training staff to use their lemon when a good site would require minimal training. Because most lemons are never cured, the most important takeaway is prevention.\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • The ‘Works’ = version upgrade plus structural overhaul, possibly including redesign or design cleanup. If this does not include a redesign or new features, it requires minimal management, client attention, or paperwork (minimizing these things will lower cost and this project can be done by folks who do not thrive on conference calls and email chains. This person needs to concentrate). It may require a hero. It is unglamorous work that will likely be underappreciated.\nSome common techniques:\nContent type simplification\nPHP format extraction\nTemplate extermination\nDatabase decrudifying\nThe cure is to delete mercilessly on all levels, not to add another layer of bandages\nThe need to save content, users, and to minimize or avoid any downtime makes the treatment difficult\n
  • Seeking expert advice\nWho can benefit from a site audit?\nLow budget lemons: simplify, remove features, go lean\n
  • Seeking expert advice\nWho can benefit from a site audit?\nLow budget lemons: simplify, remove features, go lean\n
  • Seeking expert advice\nWho can benefit from a site audit?\nLow budget lemons: simplify, remove features, go lean\n
  • Seeking expert advice\nWho can benefit from a site audit?\nLow budget lemons: simplify, remove features, go lean\n
  • LEMON - On Drupal diseases and cures

    1. 1. LEMON... Drupal diseases and cures ... Abhijit Tembhekar via flickr
    2. 2. LEMON... Drupal diseases and cures ... Abhijit Tembhekar via flickr
    3. 3. Jody Hamilton alexslemonade.org via Message Agency ... and hundredsredlemona.de via Zivtech / of non-lemon- ThinkCursor themed Drupal sites
    4. 4. Definition
    5. 5. • A small change is always a big project Definition
    6. 6. • A small change is always a big project• Consistently frustrating Definition
    7. 7. • A small change is always a big project• Consistently frustrating• Cheaper to rebuild from scratch than to fully fix Definition
    8. 8. • A small change is always a big project• Consistently frustrating• Cheaper to rebuild from scratch than to fully fix• Does not have the benefits of a Drupal site Definition
    9. 9. • A small change is always a big project• Consistently frustrating• Cheaper to rebuild from scratch than to fully fix• Does not have the benefits of a Drupal site• No future Definition
    10. 10. honeycut07 via flickrPrevalence
    11. 11. • Immaturity of field honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    12. 12. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    13. 13. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts • Difficulty is under-appreciated honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    14. 14. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts • Difficulty is under-appreciated • Hard to assess credentials honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    15. 15. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts • Difficulty is under-appreciated • Hard to assess credentials• Drupal makes it easy honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    16. 16. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts • Difficulty is under-appreciated • Hard to assess credentials• Drupal makes it easy • to totally mess up your site honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    17. 17. • Immaturity of field • Lack of experts • Difficulty is under-appreciated • Hard to assess credentials• Drupal makes it easy • to totally mess up your site • in so many different ways honeycut07 via flickr Prevalence
    18. 18. Pathology
    19. 19. • Quality is Pathology
    20. 20. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process Pathology
    21. 21. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach Pathology
    22. 22. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach• Quality is not Pathology
    23. 23. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach• Quality is not • A single line item or a single project phase Pathology
    24. 24. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach• Quality is not • A single line item or a single project phase • Something to outsource or have interns deal with Pathology
    25. 25. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach• Quality is not • A single line item or a single project phase • Something to outsource or have interns deal with • An time or budget to skip if running short on optional feature Pathology
    26. 26. • Quality is • Meeting standards throughout the process • A holistic approach• Quality is not • A single line item or a single project phase • Something to outsource or have interns deal with • An time or budget to skip if running short on optional feature • A natural result of a fixed-price/fixed-scope contract Pathology
    27. 27. elkit via flickrForms
    28. 28. elkit via flickrForms
    29. 29. elkit via flickr• Usability Lemon Forms
    30. 30. elkit via flickr• Usability Lemon• Infested Lemon Forms
    31. 31. • Fanboy Lemon elkit via flickr• Usability Lemon• Infested Lemon Forms
    32. 32. • Fanboy Lemon elkit via flickr• Usability Lemon• Infested Lemon • Desperado Lemon Forms
    33. 33. chotda via flickrSymptoms
    34. 34. • Staff usability problems chotda via flickr Symptoms
    35. 35. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems chotda via flickr Symptoms
    36. 36. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance chotda via flickr Symptoms
    37. 37. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance• Security chotda via flickr Symptoms
    38. 38. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance• Security• Bugs chotda via flickr Symptoms
    39. 39. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance• Security• Bugs• Missing features chotda via flickr Symptoms
    40. 40. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance• Security• Bugs• Missing features• Lack of robustness / difficulty expanding chotda via flickr Symptoms
    41. 41. • Staff usability problems• Public usability problems• Performance• Security• Bugs• Missing features• Lack of robustness / difficulty expanding• Inability to upgrade chotda via flickr Symptoms
    42. 42. wiccked via flickrIndicators
    43. 43. • Too-many syndromes: wiccked via flickr Indicators
    44. 44. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome wiccked via flickr Indicators
    45. 45. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation wiccked via flickr Indicators
    46. 46. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis wiccked via flickr Indicators
    47. 47. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania wiccked via flickr Indicators
    48. 48. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium wiccked via flickr Indicators
    49. 49. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense wiccked via flickr Indicators
    50. 50. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core) wiccked via flickr Indicators
    51. 51. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core)• Going around the chain of command wiccked via flickr Indicators
    52. 52. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core)• Going around the chain of command• Drupal violations: wiccked via flickr Indicators
    53. 53. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core)• Going around the chain of command• Drupal violations: • breaking configurations wiccked via flickr Indicators
    54. 54. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core)• Going around the chain of command• Drupal violations: • breaking configurations • hacked files wiccked via flickr Indicators
    55. 55. • Too-many syndromes: • Just-another-module syndrome • Over-templation • Content-typitis • Role-mania • Block-a-modium• Lack of semantic sense• PHP format (red flag of core)• Going around the chain of command• Drupal violations: • breaking configurations • hacked files• Missing Drupal security wiccked via flickr conventions Indicators
    56. 56. terriem via flickrContraindicators
    57. 57. • Isolatable Problems: terriem via flickr Contraindicators
    58. 58. • Isolatable Problems: • CSS/JS bugs terriem via flickr Contraindicators
    59. 59. • Isolatable Problems: • CSS/JS bugs • Server performance terriem via flickr Contraindicators
    60. 60. • Isolatable Problems: • CSS/JS bugs • Server performance • Problems from specific modules terriem via flickr Contraindicators
    61. 61. Carl Black via flickrDiagnosis
    62. 62. • Site audit Carl Black via flickr Diagnosis
    63. 63. • Site audit• Emergency fixes plus mini-evaluation Carl Black via flickr Diagnosis
    64. 64. • Site audit• Emergency fixes plus mini-evaluation• Hacked! module Carl Black via flickr Diagnosis
    65. 65. • Site audit• Emergency fixes plus mini-evaluation• Hacked! module• > 100 modules test Carl Black via flickr Diagnosis
    66. 66. • Site audit• Emergency fixes plus mini-evaluation• Hacked! module• > 100 modules test• Ask for an honest opinion Carl Black via flickr Diagnosis
    67. 67. alui0000 via flickrMisdiagnosis
    68. 68. • Frustrations are deemed ‘normal’ alui0000 via flickr Misdiagnosis
    69. 69. • Frustrations are deemed ‘normal’• Software is vilified alui0000 via flickr Misdiagnosis
    70. 70. • Frustrations are deemed ‘normal’• Software is vilified• Sites are treated as disposable alui0000 via flickr Misdiagnosis
    71. 71. • Frustrations are deemed ‘normal’• Software is vilified• Sites are treated as disposable• Experience of the alternative sheds light on the problem alui0000 via flickr Misdiagnosis
    72. 72. stevelewalready via flickrUnusual Mutations
    73. 73. • Distorted results of organizational politics stevelewalready via flickrUnusual Mutations
    74. 74. • Distorted results of organizational politics• Unnecessary & convoluted integrations stevelewalready via flickrUnusual Mutations
    75. 75. Martin LaBar via flickrEarly Stages
    76. 76. • Subcontracting Martin LaBar via flickr Early Stages
    77. 77. • Subcontracting• Use internal staff with little Drupal background Martin LaBar via flickr Early Stages
    78. 78. • Subcontracting• Use internal staff with little Drupal background• Too many cooks, too little chefs Martin LaBar via flickr Early Stages
    79. 79. • Subcontracting• Use internal staff with little Drupal background• Too many cooks, too little chefs• Underpaying Martin LaBar via flickr Early Stages
    80. 80. • Subcontracting• Use internal staff with little Drupal background• Too many cooks, too little chefs• Underpaying• Not taking expert advice Martin LaBar via flickr Early Stages
    81. 81. Chiot’s Run via flickrPrevention
    82. 82. • Hiring / Contracting Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    83. 83. • Hiring / Contracting• Quality Assurance Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    84. 84. • Hiring / Contracting• Quality Assurance • Continuous pest control Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    85. 85. • Hiring / Contracting• Quality Assurance • Continuous pest control • Peer review Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    86. 86. • Hiring / Contracting• Quality Assurance • Continuous pest control • Peer review • Processes for ticketing, development, VCS etc Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    87. 87. • Hiring / Contracting• Quality Assurance • Continuous pest control • Peer review • Processes for ticketing, development, VCS etc• Advocate for a future-ready site Chiot’s Run via flickr Prevention
    88. 88. Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickrTerminal Cases
    89. 89. Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickrTerminal Cases
    90. 90. • A rebuild can cost less than a complete fix Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickr Terminal Cases
    91. 91. • A rebuild can cost less than a complete fix• A rebuild can cost more then the original build Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickr Terminal Cases
    92. 92. • A rebuild can cost less than a complete fix• A rebuild can cost more then the original build• Most bad after organizations opt to throw good money Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickr Terminal Cases
    93. 93. • A rebuild can cost less than a complete fix• A rebuild can cost more then the original build• Most bad after organizations opt to throw good money• Often the website is not the only lemon in an organization Manuel Barroso Parejo via flickr Terminal Cases
    94. 94. Treatment
    95. 95. • Site audit followed by cleanup Treatment
    96. 96. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul Treatment
    97. 97. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul • Content type simplification Treatment
    98. 98. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul • Content type simplification • PHP format extraction Treatment
    99. 99. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul • Content type simplification • PHP format extraction • Template extermination Treatment
    100. 100. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul • Content type simplification • PHP format extraction • Template extermination • Database decrudifying Treatment
    101. 101. • Site audit followed by cleanup• ‘The Works’ - version upgrade with structural overhaul • Content type simplification • PHP format extraction • Template extermination • Database decrudifying • Delete, delete, delete Treatment
    102. 102. onkel_wart via flickrSupport
    103. 103. • You are not alone onkel_wart via flickr Support
    104. 104. • You are not alone• Seek advice from experts and community onkel_wart via flickr Support
    105. 105. • You are not alone• Seek advice from experts and community• Simplify onkel_wart via flickr Support

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