Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
A Survival Survey of Tree and Shrub 
 Plantings under the CREP Riparian 
     Forest Buffer BMP in the 
    NYC Watersheds...
We all want to know how are we 
doing and how we can improve our 
             efforts.




  Plot 27‐8, planted in 2001, ...
Purpose of the Study
• Review survival and performance to consider 
  whether modifications are needed to improve 
  succe...
Background on CREP Riparian Forest 
            Buffer BMP
• 764.9 acres planted  on 159 farms between 1999‐2006
• Plantin...
Sampling Design
• Random sample of 10 percent of the planted 
  areas on 10 percent of the farms planted 
  between 2000 a...
Sampling Process
• Used random systematic sampling techniques 
  to select 16 farms from a list of all contracts 
  organi...
Survey Practices
• Measured height and the widest diameter of the 
  canopy for trees and shrubs under 12 ft.
• Identified...
Data Compilation and Analysis
• Created a Access database with separate tables 
  for the farm, plots and plants
• Compare...
Survival and Stocking
• Average Survival was based on estimate 440 
  plants per acre
• Overall average survival was 18.9 ...
Some sites you have great success…
Then again others …. not so much.
Table 1. Estimated Per Acre Plant Density and Approximate Survival Percentage by CREP Contract 

   Contract         Area ...
Canopy Cover
• Percent cover calculated for planted species 
  and natural regeneration trees and shrubs

• Total Cover – ...
Canopy Cover
Survival by Species
• Wide range of trees and shrubs were planted 
  but the survival was greatest for a small group 
  of...
Performance ‐ Vigor
• Surviving trees with the Best Vigor were 
  White Spruce, Tamarack, White Pine, 
  Sycamore, River B...
Effectiveness of Protection
Table 7.  The Effect of Tree and Shrub Protection Measures on Plant Vigor

                   ...
Competition
High herbaceous competition  
  30% of the plots




                                Moderate herbaceous compe...
Site Conditions
Fencing is enabling recovery
But even if fenced, some wet areas may not 
transition to woody vegetation within the current 
                  contract ...
Summary
• Low and highly variable survival
• High competition and tough site conditions
• Natural regeneration is importan...
Options for the future
• Reduce reliance on planting if maintenance is not 
  possible – emphasize natural regeneration 
•...
Acknowledgements
• SUNY Delhi Interns Summers of 2008 and 
  2009
• SCA‐Americorps Member, Hanh Chu
• Ed Blouin, Brandon D...
P.Eskeli - CREP Survival Survey Trees And Shrub Plantings
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

P.Eskeli - CREP Survival Survey Trees And Shrub Plantings

896 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

P.Eskeli - CREP Survival Survey Trees And Shrub Plantings

  1. 1. A Survival Survey of Tree and Shrub  Plantings under the CREP Riparian  Forest Buffer BMP in the  NYC Watersheds 1999‐2006 
  2. 2. We all want to know how are we  doing and how we can improve our  efforts. Plot 27‐8, planted in 2001, low competition, wet soils,  95% survival, 62% poor vigor, heavy browse
  3. 3. Purpose of the Study • Review survival and performance to consider  whether modifications are needed to improve  success • Consider factors influencing survival and  performance of the plantings • Identify possible modifications to the practice  as part of the CREP Evaluation FAD deliverable • Ensure that CREP Riparian Forest Buffers are  protecting water quality 
  4. 4. Background on CREP Riparian Forest  Buffer BMP • 764.9 acres planted  on 159 farms between 1999‐2006 • Planting mainly in spring, but some fall plantings • Mostly planted bare root stock, commonly using brush  mats and a limited number of tree tubes • WAP Planners worked with landowners to define CREP  areas, fencing needs and plant assemblage.  Planting  was contracted at a cost of approx $2K/ac.  Stocking  typically 440 stems/ac. • Spot checking for three years after planting • Replanting possible where survival less than 60%
  5. 5. Sampling Design • Random sample of 10 percent of the planted  areas on 10 percent of the farms planted  between 2000 and 2006. • Establish plots and measure plant heights and  canopy diameter (both planted and natural  regeneration • Describe the vigor, competition and site  conditions • Note damage from flooding, browse and  presence/integrity of fencing, presence of  invasive plants
  6. 6. Sampling Process • Used random systematic sampling techniques  to select 16 farms from a list of all contracts  organized by area planted • Randomly selected plot centers using GIS • Used GPS to navigate to the plots • Confirmed the plot was located in a planted  area and established a 1/10th acre circular plot
  7. 7. Survey Practices • Measured height and the widest diameter of the  canopy for trees and shrubs under 12 ft. • Identified species of tree or shrub • Occularly estimated height and canopy diameter  for larger trees and shrubs (natural regeneration) • Photographed the plot from the four cardinal  directions • Deducted unplanted areas and weighted the  results of the planted area for plots that were  less than 1/10th acre.
  8. 8. Data Compilation and Analysis • Created a Access database with separate tables  for the farm, plots and plants • Compared the number of live “likely” planted  stems with the number of stems planned to have  been planted per acre (planned stocking was  approximately 440 stems per acre) • Calculated estimates of plot canopy coverage for  both planted material, natural regeneration  • Analyzed data at overall program, each farm, plot  and by species
  9. 9. Survival and Stocking • Average Survival was based on estimate 440  plants per acre • Overall average survival was 18.9 percent • Stocking was an average of 107 stems per acre • Variation is high between farms  • Variation is high between plots within a farm • Variation is high within years
  10. 10. Some sites you have great success…
  11. 11. Then again others …. not so much.
  12. 12. Table 1. Estimated Per Acre Plant Density and Approximate Survival Percentage by CREP Contract  Contract  Area Planted  Number of  Area Sampled  Estimated  Survival  Number (ac.) Plots Year Planted Plant Count (ac.) Stems Per Acre Percentage 48 1 1 2000 0 0.10 0 0.00% 57 2 2 2001 27 0.07 383.52 87.16%* 27 1.5 2 2001 20 0.11 190.48 43.29% 65 3.5 4 2002 64 0.31 207.93 47.26% 44 2.5 3 2002 26 0.15 170.94 38.85% 59 12 12 2002 63 0.85 74.29 16.88% 55 10 10 2002 66 0.91 72.69 16.52% 66 8 8 2002 32 0.50 64.16 14.58% 52 8 8 2002 26 0.45 58.36 13.26% 101 1 1 2002 2 0.05 40.00 9.09% 93 3.5 4 2002 9 0.34 26.47 6.02% 109 3 3 2003 41 0.24 168.72 38.35% 147 5 5 2005 47 0.50 94.00 21.36% 145 19 19 2005 125 1.66 75.35 17.12% 142 9 9 2006 34 0.68 49.83 11.33% 156 1.5 2 2006 7 0.15 46.67 10.61% Totals and  90.5 93 589 7.06 107.71 18.96% Avg.
  13. 13. Canopy Cover • Percent cover calculated for planted species  and natural regeneration trees and shrubs • Total Cover – 10.45% • Planted Vegetation – 2.45% • Natural Regeneration – 8.01%
  14. 14. Canopy Cover
  15. 15. Survival by Species • Wide range of trees and shrubs were planted  but the survival was greatest for a small group  of species. Initial finding suggest: • Best Surviving Trees –White Spruce, Swamp  White Oak, Green Ash, Black Walnut* • Best Surviving Shrubs – Red Osier Dogwood,  Ninebark, Highbush Cranberry, Winterberry
  16. 16. Performance ‐ Vigor • Surviving trees with the Best Vigor were  White Spruce, Tamarack, White Pine,  Sycamore, River Birch • Surviving shrubs with the Best Vigor were  Ninebark, Red Osier Dogwood • Worst survival and performance –Highbush  Blueberry, Hazelnut, Nannyberry
  17. 17. Effectiveness of Protection Table 7.  The Effect of Tree and Shrub Protection Measures on Plant Vigor Total Of Protection  Protection Vigor Type High Moderate Poor Dead mat 96 99 118 236 549 mat/tube 3 3 3 10 19 none 120 90 49 2 261 tube 3 2 3 2 10 Total 222 194 173 250 839
  18. 18. Competition High herbaceous competition   30% of the plots Moderate herbaceous competition   50% of the plots
  19. 19. Site Conditions
  20. 20. Fencing is enabling recovery
  21. 21. But even if fenced, some wet areas may not  transition to woody vegetation within the current  contract period
  22. 22. Summary • Low and highly variable survival • High competition and tough site conditions • Natural regeneration is important component of  the buffer • Fencing is key to natural regeneration • Benefits of using mats and tubes uncertain • Difficult to monitor due to limited knowledge of  what was actually planted and existed • Buffers are present and likely functioning, but  may look different than originally anticipated 
  23. 23. Options for the future • Reduce reliance on planting if maintenance is not  possible – emphasize natural regeneration  • Increase stocking and use of containerized stock • Use wider range of species known to grow in this  area and on the wet sites • Re‐enrollment will be necessary to achieve full  buffer protection • Improve site characterization, mapping and  establish continuous monitoring protocol
  24. 24. Acknowledgements • SUNY Delhi Interns Summers of 2008 and  2009 • SCA‐Americorps Member, Hanh Chu • Ed Blouin, Brandon Dennis, Julian Drelich,  Karen Clifford and the CREP committee

×