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Rise using ethnography_jon_freach_final

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This is a presentation that I gave that 2011 RISE University day at the University of Texas - a one day event held on the UT campus for undergraduate and graduate entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs-to-be.

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Rise using ethnography_jon_freach_final

  1. 1. Jon Freach<br />Using Ethnography<br />for Social Innovation<br />RISE University Day<br />© 2011 confidential & proprietary<br />
  2. 2. Trobriand Islands<br />
  3. 3. Language<br />Sex<br />Yams <br />Currency<br />Food<br />Cricket<br />Marriage<br />Spells<br />Mourning<br />
  4. 4.
  5. 5. This means something<br />
  6. 6. “<br />If I had asked my customers what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse.”<br />Henry Ford<br />
  7. 7. Don’t just ask. <br />
  8. 8. Don’t just ask. Learn to see.<br />
  9. 9. Ethnography is a tool for better designbecause it provides context for designers.<br />
  10. 10. It helps us learn about and connect with the people we are designing for.<br />
  11. 11. By collecting data about what they do, what they think, what they expect, and how they relate.<br />
  12. 12. And it provides us a glimpse of what people need (and what they don’t know they need).<br />
  13. 13. It can tell us something about how people interpret things in their life – how they construct meaning through the stories they tell themselves and others.<br />
  14. 14. “<br />Most things are experienced indirectly. When we encounter anything, whether strange or familiar, we experience it though a set of expectations which we use to construct the meaning for ourselves.”<br />Rick Robinson, Consumer Anthropologist<br />
  15. 15. Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Natural events and forces<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />Other people<br />(in all of their complexity)<br />You, <br />in all of your <br />complexity<br />an experience<br />Designed artifacts<br />Your morals<br />Your religious views<br />Your political views<br />Your hairstyle<br />The way people have treated you<br />The things you read and watch<br />Your capacity for love<br />The car you drive<br />The things you’ve done<br />Your ability for empathy<br />Your dreams<br />The places you’ve visited<br />The way you feel today<br />The place you live<br />Your manual dexterity <br />Your prejudices <br />Slide courtesy Jon Kolko, AC4D<br />Designed artifacts<br />Designed artifacts<br />Designed artifacts<br />Designed artifacts<br />Designed artifacts<br />
  16. 16. Today’s Topics:<br />History<br />Examples<br />Doing Fieldwork<br />Sensemaking<br />Design<br />
  17. 17. 1 An Incomplete History of Ethnography<br />
  18. 18. Bronislaw Malinowski<br />
  19. 19. Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson<br />
  20. 20. Jane Goodall<br />
  21. 21. Claude Lévi-Strauss<br />
  22. 22. Xerox PARC<br />
  23. 23. IIT Institute of Design<br />
  24. 24. e-Lab<br />
  25. 25. Doblin Group<br />
  26. 26. IDEO<br />
  27. 27. frog<br />
  28. 28. 2Examples of Applied Ethnography to Social Problems<br />
  29. 29. Access Wayfinding System<br />
  30. 30. Project M<br />
  31. 31. Photocopier Design Language<br />
  32. 32. Hippo Water Roller<br />
  33. 33. Mothers 2 Mothers<br />
  34. 34. Austin Center for Design <br />
  35. 35. 3 Doing Fieldwork<br />
  36. 36. What should we study?<br />
  37. 37. Overview<br />Key Questions <br />Desired Outcomes<br />Methodology<br />Participant Profiles<br />Compensation<br />Schedule<br />Research Plan<br />
  38. 38. Who should we study?<br />
  39. 39. Recruiting criteria<br />Who NOT to recruit<br />Phone script<br />Screening questions<br />Screener<br />
  40. 40. Where should we study them?<br />
  41. 41. Access<br />
  42. 42. Field Research Tools<br />
  43. 43. Digital camera<br />
  44. 44. Flip video camera<br />
  45. 45. Digital audio recorder<br />
  46. 46. Spiral notebook<br />
  47. 47. LiveScribe<br />
  48. 48. Word or Excel<br />
  49. 49. Field research bag<br />
  50. 50. Unpacked<br />
  51. 51. Field Research Methods<br />
  52. 52. Activities <br />Environments<br />Interactions<br />Objects<br />Users<br />AEIOU framework<br />
  53. 53. Immersive research<br />
  54. 54. Shadowing<br />
  55. 55. Interviews<br />
  56. 56. Contextual Inquiries<br />
  57. 57. Participatory Design<br />
  58. 58. Participatory Design<br />
  59. 59. 4 Sensemaking<br />
  60. 60. “<br />Sensemaking involves turning circumstances into a situation that is comprehended explicitly in wordsand that serves as a springboard into action.”<br />Karl Weick, Organizing and The Process of Sensemaking<br />
  61. 61.
  62. 62.
  63. 63.
  64. 64. Observations<br />Insights<br />Needs (or Themes)<br />Opportunity Areas<br />……………………………….................<br />=<br />Put data in buckets<br />Draw insights<br />Abduct needs<br />Form opportunities<br />Observations from contextual inquiries are organized in “buckets”:<br /><ul><li> Motivations
  65. 65. Expectations
  66. 66. Frustrations
  67. 67. Distractions
  68. 68. Enablers </li></ul>Insights are drawn from the observations in each bucket. An insight is a summary of similar data points in a concise statement.<br />Needs are abducted from the collective student insights. Needs provide the primary conditions for design concepts. <br />Opportunities are formed by combining user insights with market evidence or another data source. They are a tangible way to fulfill needs and impact the user experience.<br />Turning research into design<br />
  69. 69. Externalizing the data<br />
  70. 70. Organizing the data<br />
  71. 71. Judging the data<br />
  72. 72. Abduction<br />
  73. 73. Observations<br />
  74. 74. Insights<br />
  75. 75. Themes<br />
  76. 76. “<br />To work with the idea of sensemakingis to appreciate that smallness does not equate with insignificance. Small structures can have large consequences.”<br />Karl Weick, Organizing and The Process of Sensemaking<br />
  77. 77. “<br />In our social-impact work we are not looking for a silver bullet, to invent something new that never existed before and will instantly transform people’s lives. Rather, we are looking to help magnify the scale and impact of many different, small ideas to improve the “design” of these initiatives so that they work better and work better together. In the process, we turn local participants, such as community organizers, into design researchers of a sort, able to see new opportunities differently and adapt their skills to drive a collaborative process.”<br />Robert Fabricant, Vice-President of Creative, frog design<br />
  78. 78. Readings<br />
  79. 79. 5 Design<br />
  80. 80.
  81. 81. ARCH research<br />
  82. 82. Hour School<br />
  83. 83. Hour School<br />
  84. 84. Hour School<br />
  85. 85. Nudge Us<br />
  86. 86. eBay for Benefits<br />
  87. 87. OneUp<br />
  88. 88. Pocket Hotline<br />
  89. 89.
  90. 90. Austin Center for Design <br />www.austincenterfordesign.com<br />jfreach@austincenterfordesign.com<br />frog design<br />www.frogdesign.com<br />jon.freach@frogdesign.com<br />
  91. 91. COMMUNITY SUPPORT<br />Did you enjoy this session? <br />Please support your local entrepreneurs and help us to keep this conference free.<br /> Your contributions help us continue delivering the value of a high-dollar conference along with that unbeatable price tag. <br />Pledge to donate by sending keyword ‘RISE’ and your desired amount to 91011. <br />The mission of RISE is to inspire and empower entrepreneurs of all stages. <br />

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