Edward ii

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Edward ii

  1. 1. Edward IIChristopher Marlowe 1592
  2. 2. 1 wanton poets The term wanton suggests poetry linked to love, passion and lascivious behaviour.
  3. 3. 3 This suggests Gaveston’s manipulation of the king, and thus implies he may prove to be dangerous to Edward.
  4. 4. 5 masques balls or gatherings where guests came in disguise (think R&J). the inclusion of this detail is another hint that deceit or self-interest may form part of Gaveston’s attachment.
  5. 5. 8 sylvan nymphs this classical reference is to beautiful mythical creatures that were believed to live in woods.
  6. 6. 9 satyrs mythical beasts that were half man, half goat and particularly lecherous; another classical image.
  7. 7. 10 antic hay this reference to pagan activities again reinforces the anarchic nature of Gaveston’s relationship with Edward.
  8. 8. 11 Dian’s shape Diana was the goddess of love, but note the reference is to a boy’s shape, again suggesting the king’s penchant for men.
  9. 9. 12 gilds the water as itglides this alliterative phrase suggests sensuality; the pace is slowed by the elongated i sound in glides.
  10. 10. 13 Crownets of pearl the description suggests luxury, while the word naked reinforces the sensual nature of such an encounter.
  11. 11. 14 sportful playful, frolicking
  12. 12. 15 Another hint of Gaveston’s homosexual leanings.
  13. 13. 16 hard by this can be read as a double entendre, meaning ‘close by’ but also having sexual connotations.
  14. 14. 17 Actaeon another classical reference from Ovid’s Metamorphoses; the shepherd Actaeon is changed into a deer (hart, 19) because he saw the goddess Diana bathing.
  15. 15. 17 peeping emphasizes the idea of a voyeur enjoying an unintended view of the scene.
  16. 16. 20 die another sexual image. the French called the moment of sexual climax ‘le petit mort’.
  17. 17. 21 This line reiterates Gaveston’s claim of deep knowledge about the king’s pleasures.

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