L7 NZ Geography and Tourism

1,469 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,469
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
556
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

L7 NZ Geography and Tourism

  1. 1. NZ Famous Features and Tourism <ul><li>Lesson Aims: </li></ul><ul><li>To describe key features of NZ terrain. </li></ul><ul><li>To explain how successful the tourism industry is as a result of NZ Geography. </li></ul><ul><li>Key Words: </li></ul><ul><li>Terrain </li></ul><ul><li>Tourism </li></ul>Do now: Discuss: What places have you been in NZ which has amazing Geography? What places have you been that have a huge amount of tourists?
  2. 2. Do now 2  <ul><li>Can you recognise the following NZ tourist attractions? What and where? </li></ul>Ohakune’s Carrot Christchurch’s Chalice Paeroa’s big bottle Cape Reinga’s Lighthouse 1 2 3 4
  3. 3. Term Outline Enquiry Questions Where did NZ come from? Where did NZers come from? Why is NZ unique? Who are the Kiwis? Role models and national identity What is NZ’s relationship with the world? What is the future of New Zealand? Lesson Key Questions What is significant about NZ flora and fauna? What is significant about NZ geography? The tourism industry. What is biculturalism? Waitangi and beyond Who were the suffragists? How does the New Zealand political system work? Parliament and the Commonwealth. Why is New Zealand nuclear free?
  4. 4. Lesson Objectives <ul><li>To explain what the most significant animal or plant is in NZ. </li></ul><ul><li>To write a structured paragraph. </li></ul><ul><li>To describe a variety of New Zealand flora and fauna </li></ul>All A Few All Create Argument
  5. 5. Mapping and Key locations <ul><li>Using your atlas, find the following locations and label them clearly on your map: </li></ul><ul><li>Auckland </li></ul><ul><li>Christchurch </li></ul><ul><li>Bank’s Peninsula </li></ul><ul><li>Wellington </li></ul><ul><li>Dunedin </li></ul><ul><li>Stewart Island </li></ul>
  6. 6. Instructions for Activity <ul><li>Using the following slides, fill out the mapping worksheet you have been given. </li></ul><ul><li>For each slide you will need to locate it using the clues and your atlas. </li></ul><ul><li>You will then need to </li></ul><ul><li>write down a summary </li></ul><ul><li>of why you think it </li></ul><ul><li>attracts tourists. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Waitomo Caves <ul><li>Located south of Otorohunga </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.waitomo.com/ : </li></ul><ul><li>More than 30 million years ago, the legend of Waitomo began with the creation of limestone at the bottom of the ocean. Now these limestone formations stand as one of New Zealand's most inspiring natural wonders and a must-see destination. </li></ul><ul><li>Discover magical glowworms by boat in the world famous Waitomo Glowworm Caves . </li></ul>Girl rock-climbing in Waitomo Caves
  8. 8. The Beehive <ul><li>Located in Wellington </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.viator.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>New Zealand’s architectural symbol is the beehive-shaped Parliament House in Wellington. </li></ul><ul><li>Hosting the executive wing of parliament, ‘the Beehive’ was built between 1969 and 1981, and features murals and artworks by noted New Zealand artists. </li></ul><ul><li>The building has 10 floors, filled with cabinet rooms, prime ministerial offices, a banqueting hall, function rooms and several restaurants. </li></ul>The Beehive
  9. 9. Franz Josef Glacier <ul><li>Located just south of Whataroa </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.nzescape.com </li></ul><ul><li>Because of it's steepness and location, the Franz Josef Glacier is the most dynamic in the world and responds quickly to variations of precipitation and temperature. Visiting the glaciers is a must - see attraction. You can walk to within metres of the terminal face - or take a guided walk onto the glacier itself. Helicopter flights are also available, with the option of a glacier landing as well. </li></ul>Glacier... ICE
  10. 10. Sky tower <ul><li>Located in Auckland </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.tourism.net.nz </li></ul><ul><li>Take a trip to the world renown Sky Tower. At 328 metres the Sky Tower is the tallest tower in the Southern Hemisphere (taller than the Eiffel Tower in Paris or Sydney's AMP Tower). The Sky Tower is about as tall as 37 buses end on end! </li></ul><ul><li>Offering breath-taking views for more than 80 kilometres in every direction, it's an unmissable attraction in Auckland. On a clear day you can see approximately 82 kilometres (51 miles) from Sky Tower. </li></ul><ul><li>If you are feeling brave, take a jump off the Sky Tower with Sky Jump and fall 192 metres to the pavement below! </li></ul>The Skytower
  11. 11. Rangitoto Island <ul><li>Located in Auckland </li></ul><ul><li>From http://blog.ratestogo.com </li></ul><ul><li>Rangitoto Island is the most youthful of the volcanoes in the area, but it is also the largest. The island used to boast a number of residential settlements, but they were abandoned after the </li></ul>Depression, leaving only a glimpse of what life was like in the early 1900’s. Today the island features plenty of hiking and walking trails, hundreds of unique plant varieties, and an incredible dense phoutukawa forest. Rangitoto Island
  12. 12. Rotorua <ul><li>Located in Rotorua </li></ul><ul><li>From http://blog.ratestogo.com </li></ul><ul><li>Rotorua is another incredible New Zealand destination. One of the most prominent features in this city is The Bath House, which is considered one of the most incredible spas in all of the South Pacific. The natural hot springs draw visitors from all over, as everyone clamors to take advantage of their therapeutic properties. </li></ul>Rotorua mud pools Boiling Mud! Geysers of water!
  13. 13. Moeraki Boulders <ul><li>Located south of Hampden in Otago </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.moerakiboulders.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>The Moeraki Boulders are a number of huge spherical stones, found strewn along a stretch of Koekohe Beach near Moeraki, a small settlement just south of Hampden on New Zealand's </li></ul>Moeraki Boulders Otago coast. They originally formed in ancient sea floor sediments during the early Paleocene some 60 million years ago. The boulders weigh several tonnes and are up to three metres in . diametre. Maori legend tells that the boulders are remains of calabashes, kumaras and eel baskets that washed ashore after the legendary canoe, the Araiteuru was wrecked at nearby Shag Point.
  14. 14. Goat Island <ul><li>Located near Leigh north of Auckland </li></ul><ul><li>From http://www.seafriends.org.nz/ </li></ul><ul><li>Since its creation in 1975, our first marine reserve was founded in Goat Island and has been used extensively for scientific research. It has helped as a training ground for diving and has inspired many people who come to this magical place to enjoy the friendly fishes. Many schools come here each year to introduce students to the marvels and mysteries of our marine environment. </li></ul>Goat Island
  15. 15. <ul><li>Choose one of the following points to debate: </li></ul><ul><li>Tourism is ruining New Zealand </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>When put in perspective, NZ landscape isn’t as special as people say it is. (compare with other places in the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Get into groups of four. 2 of you must argue in agreement of the point. 2 of you must argue against it. </li></ul>Class debate
  16. 16. Homework – Write a report or brochure <ul><li>Why else do people come to NZ for tourism? </li></ul><ul><li>Choose any reason you like as long as it is NOT Geography </li></ul><ul><li>You must state a main point. </li></ul>You must provide a number of examples of your choice from New Zealand. You must provide an explanation for why you think they’re an important part of tourism.

×